Workshop Session

Campus Farms are Living Classrooms

Workshop Focus: Learn how to bring more classes to your campus farms to give students hands on opportunities to engage and develop solutions to issues of social and environmental justice. Hear from farm managers about their successes developing living classrooms at their institutions.

Yale University: Farm Credit: Bringing More Courses to the University Farm

Learn about the opportunities and rewards of working with faculty members to bring classes onto your farm. Integrating campus farms with the academic mission of an institution can cultivate alliances and support in surprising places. Bringing a more diverse array of student interests to a campus farm can add energy and valuable new perspectives to the operation.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

Experiencing agriculture as part of a course of study can result in better, more nuanced, ideas. And building support among faculty and administrators (which can be one result of campus farmers engaging with faculty) can help secure the future of a campus farm, which keeps the important work alive.

Thompkins Cortland Community College: The Farm as a Living Classroom

Whether students are pursuing a degree in Sustainable Farming and Food Systems, Environmental Science or another program at Tompkins Cortland Community College, the TC3 Farm serves as an effective living laboratory. The objective of this session is to discuss the ways that the farm is used for besides just production. Students, either taking a class on

the farm or visiting, are exposed to ways a farm impacts the environment and community.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

The students enrolled in our Sustainable Farming and Food Systems degree program are exposed to the environmental impacts that organic farming has on our land and the role that a small farm can have in strengthening a communities local food system, as well as tackling issues of food insecurity.


Course Instructors

Jeremy Oldfield

Jeremy Oldfield

Yale University

Todd McLane

Todd McLane

Thompkins Cortland Community College


Farms as Catalysts for Campus Change: How Can We B-EAT This?

Workshop Focus: Learn how campus farms offer unique places for students to get involved with and change the campus food system. Hear from students, farm managers, and dining staff on how farms can be a catalyst for campus change.

Bard College: Farms as Catalysts for Campus Change

The farm has impacted academics, has pushed the college to form the Bard EATS council, to sign the Real Food Challenge and to source more seasonally and buy imperfect produce from other vendors. The farm has also led to a food systems practicum and to the creation of a new food/agricultural position. This one farm truly has been a catalyst for campus change. Attendees of this session will hear faculty, staff and dining services perspectives on Bard farm’s impact on the larger campus food system.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

Dining service buys ALL food produced by the farm and thanks to the change in culture can now buy imperfect produce from other vendors (cutting down on food waste). The farm helps to promotes seasonality and carbon emission reduction.

Stonehill College’s Title: How Can We B-EAT This?

We will explore student led initiatives to change food sourcing. Stonehill’s Food Truth club members will discuss the Real Food Challenge and how having access to a working farm has aided in the movement towards ecologically sound, humane, organic, local and fair food for students. While trying to get a major college food provider to change from mass producing companies to sustainable choices isn’t the easiest, this workshop will explain the process and road bumps encountered while on the journey to conscious food consumption.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

We hope that through our discussion students, educators and farmers are encouraged to think about food production and consumption in their daily lives. It is often easy to ignore where food comes from, as it is conveniently packaged and placed on store shelves. We hope students make a bigger push to know where their food providers get their sourcing from, as well as make the switch to more sustainable products. We hope that food justice becomes a topic for all discuss with their friends, family and coworkers, and that we spark a conversation that needed to be had.


Course Instructors

Katrina Light

Katrina Light

Bard College

John-Paul Silva

John-Paul Silva

Bard College

Chas Cerulli

Chas Cerulli

Bard College

Anna Pinckney

Anna Pinckney

Stonehill College

Claire Farnan

Claire Farnan

Stonehill College


Leveraging Your Campus Farmer or Farmer Training Experience

Workshop Focus: Learn how to acquire farm skills and put them to work in careers that impact the food system – on or off farm. Hear from professionals who completed The Farm School’s Training program and who worked at The Farm at Stonehill as college students.

The Farm School: Adult Farmer Training: Production, Curriculum… and Practice!

For 15 years the Farm School’s Learn to Farm Program has offered year-long, vocational training in diversified, sustainable and organic farming that straddles the dynamic tension between production scale and curriculum.  In this workshop Learn to Farm graduates Caitlin Sargent and Nick Martinelli will share insights about the program's unique structure

and approach as well as their perspectives on program outcomes, including in their own careers. Caitlin is an administrator at the Farm School, and Nick is the founder of Marty’s Local, a food hub in the Berkshires.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

The workshop will discuss our conviction that our alumni carry with them the seeds of kindness, hard work, and community that they are exposed to at the Farm School, and that these qualities then inform their future farming, work and projects.

Stonehill College Farm Alumni: Leveraging The Campus Farmer Experience: Post Grad Food Systems Career Engagement

How do you keep your campus farming experience relevant and use it to benefit your future career? Attendees should walk away with an understanding of different pathways available to students post-graduation where they can utilize the skills learned on the campus farm. Students will also leave with concrete job seeking tools and platforms for those interested in a

career in the food system. Presenters will break the group out for a brainstorming discussion to generate ideas for potential career paths related to the specific areas of interest of those in the room.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

This session will discuss how students can keep utilizing the knowledge and skills learned as a campus farmer in their future career. We will encourage students to pursue what they learned as students to keep acting for change in the 'real world'.


Course Instructors

Caitlin Sargent

Caitlin Sargent

 Nick Martinelli

Nick Martinelli

Christine Moodie

Christine Moodie

Devin Ingersoll

Devin Ingersoll

Stonehill College


 A Sustainable and Community Focused Future for Institutional Dining

Workshop Focus: Learn how campus farms have helped the school’s community learn about the complexity of agricultural systems and witnesses the power of how institutions have the potential to positively impact local businesses. Hear from campus farmers, a Bon Appetit Management Company Fellow, a Dining Services GM about how rethinking purchasing relationships between campus farms and dining service providers can undergird and facilitate the broader educational and community oriented goals of campus farms.

Bon Appetit Management Company: Working With Your Dining Service Provider: A Foundation for Farm Efficiency, Financial Sustainability, and Community Involvement

Share how campus farms can be even more effective in their educational as well as social and environmental justice focused missions by establishing or improving relationships with dining service providers, and by selling produce directly to them for revenue generation. Campus farms can generate awareness and increase involvement in their efforts by partnering with dining service providers, who can help fund initiatives, plan events, co-market, and generally offer the campus farm a larger platform to attract attention from the campus community. Relevant best practices and practical strategies for dining service and campus farm partnerships, as evidenced by examples gleaned through work as a Fellow with Bon Appetit, will be shared.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

The session will provide relevant and practical strategies for campus farmers to develop meaningful connections with dining service providers, which in turn, can have multiple benefits that increase a campus farm’s capacity to engage in activist and educational endeavors.

Hotchkiss School: A Sustainable Future for Insitutional Dining

Fairfield Farm has facilitated a shift in the culture of sustainability at Hotchkiss School. Hotchkiss now supports an impressive sustainable dining program in the country, while maintaining a flat operating budget. In this session, we hope to share our farming model and discuss not only effective ways of maintaining high production goals as an educational farm, but also ways to foster community “buy-in”. We hope to inspire others to rethink the significant potential that their school farms and dining programs have to improve both their school and local communities. 

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

Rather than preaching a specific mentality, we expose our community to how mentally, physically, and economically challenging farming and “sustainability” is. Because they have personally worked to feed the community, students on the farm become advocates against the flippant attitude towards cafeteria food most teens have. This heightened awareness has allowed the dining hall to build relationships with other farmers and demonstrate for our community and others how institutional dollars can positively influence their local economies. We hope to encourage others to rethink how much their own dining departments can accomplish by partnering with local producers and using farms and food as a way of educating their communities on what a “sustainable” future could be.


Course Instructors

Peter Todaro

Peter Todaro

Bon Appétit Management Company

 

Innovation, Learning, Teaching and Entrepreneurship at the Campus Farm

Workshop Focus: Learn how to take the exciting but potentially overwhelming job of engaging faculty, staff, students, and community partners with campus farms in meaningful ways.  Hear from farm mangers, a director of service learning, and plant care specialists about exciting existing and future about how they are managing their engaging campus farms.

Universtiy of Connecticut: Farm as the Center of Student Engagement, Grant Funding, Innovation, Teaching and Entrepreneurship

A group of SL faculty fellows in collaboration with the organic student farm received a $300,000 provost award for our proposal to make the farm a 'living and learning laboratory' for sustainable food systems in rural and urban areas and to enable us to be a model for the region, nationally, and perhaps globally. In this session you will learn how UConn Spring Valley Student Farm has leveraged this grant funding and other University resources to be the ultimate living and learning laboratory for our region while teaching students about food security, food equity, and food justice.  Participants will also gain an understanding and appreciation for the intersectionality of disciplines, offices, and operations and how mutual benefit is created through these relationships.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

There will be a focus the importance of teaching students about food inequality and social justice issues within food access and affordability in our communities.

Chatham University: Teaching and Learning on The Farm

The session will be facilitated by Tony Miga, farm manager at Chatham University’s Eden Hall Campus. He will share one farmer’s experiences running a certified organic vegetable farm, while collaborating with faculty to support graduate and undergraduate coursework, student projects, grants, workshops and more. The brief presentation will be followed by a roundtable discussion and Q&A. Others with ideas, success stories, or challenges to share are encouraged to attend.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

Part of the presentation will focus on the work we’ve done on our farm to support university initiatives around, e.g. climate change, K-12 education focused on sustainability, undergraduate and graduate coursework collaborations in both Food Studies and Sustainability, as well as the informal learning opportunities we seek to provide in the way we manage our farm.


Course Instructors

Tony Miga

Tony Miga

Chatham University

Julia M. Yakovich

Julia M. Yakovich

UCONN’s Spring Valley Student Farm


College Student Food Insecurity & Campus Farms

Workshop Focus: Learn about on campus food insecurity issues for students and how campus farms can either directly or indirectly help to alleviate the stigma of food insecurity and support these students.  Hear from Campus Compact for Southern New England about research and solutions they are supporting on campuses. 

Campus Compact of Souther New England: College Student Food Insecurity & Campus Farms

-To examine the issue of college student food insecurity, its effects on educational success and student health and wellbeing, and how food insecurity disproportionately affects low-income, first-generation, underrepresented minority, and non-traditional students.

-To identify common interventions that support food insecure college students and examples of campus farms supporting food insecure college students.

-To thoroughly explore ways that campus farms can support food insecure students by providing access to fresh foods, easing the ability to access food supports, and helping to develop a campus culture of support

- To explore the potential for and responsibility of campus farms to support college students experiencing food insecurity

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

College student food insecurity disproportionately affects low-income, first-generation, underrepresented minority, and non-traditional students. By supporting food insecure college students, campus farms have the potential to address these social justice issues and support educational success for these student populations on their own campuses. Through this workshop, I hope that attendees will see that supporting students on their campus through a campus farm is an effective and important use of campus farm resources because it addresses these social justice issues, hunger relief, and supports retention and success for at-risk students.

“sustainable” future could be.


Course Instructors

Marie Dillivan

Marie Dillivan

Campus Compact of Southern New England

 

The Hampshire College Farm: Sustainable Food, Produced Right Here

Workshop Focus: Learn about a campus farm that has been producing food for the college community for over 40 years on 70 acres of land.  Hear from the Hampshire College Farm’s Team about crop and product mix and menu planning, their evolving relationship their food service provider: Bon Appetit, pricing structures, ordering and delivery systems, and student involvement, as well as communication to our campus community about their efforts.

Hampshire College: The Hampshire College Farm: Sustainable Food, Produced Right Here

The Hampshire College Farm supplies vegetables and pasture-raised meats to our dining services and to over 400 college community members through a fall Community Supported Agriculture Program, as well as freshly produced greens, stored root crops, honey and maple syrup throughout the winter. This past semester, our farm provided over 1500 pounds of lamb, pork and beef and nearly 100% of the vegetables consumed in our dining hall. In this workshop, we will share information on how our farm operates, interfaces with our dining services and involves students in daily operations. They will share details of their successes (and failures) of our evolving relationship with our dining services and how they involve students in everything that we do.

Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

We believe that the production and consumption of food produced locally and with environmentally sound practices is directly related to social justice. Environmental Justice is Social Justice. The Hampshire Farm provides a forum in which students from all backgrounds can be directly connected to, and involved in, the production of their own food. Students with a firm understanding of the flat out hard

work of farming can only be more respectful of those who do it every day.

Serving our Neighbors and our Students: The Role of McKay Farm and Research Station in Thorndike, Maine

Workshop Focus: Learn about how McKay Farm and Research Station at Unity College engages the local community through a variety of methods intended to strengthen its position as a resource to the area and to support other local businesses and farms.  Hear from the farm manager about how to reach out to the local farms and community around your farm to forge ties and grow community.

Unity College: Serving our Neighbors and our Students: The Role of McKay Farm and Research Station in Thorndike, Maine

In many communities, local residents feel alienated from campus property unless they have a connection to a student, alum or employee. Attendees will hopefully find an example of how McKay Farm and Research Station interacts with its community and local farms that resonates or inspires them to engage their local community more. It is important to break down these barriers whenever possible so that campus farms can be more than just an extension of campus proper, but be an entity in their own right serving their constituents. If attendees are:

  1. Small businesses or farms, they should see how they may ask more of their local, campus farm.
  2. Employees or staff of the campus farm, they will see ways to engage their community and raise revenue in ways they may not had

considered.

  1. Community members they may come to realize that there are ways to interface with their local, campus farms.

 Social and Environmental Justice Connections:

McKay farm plays a role in community building and supporting small business, which empowers underrepresented individuals and bolsters the local food shed. Attendees should see where they can fit into the conversation and what roles they or their respective organizations may fill to further the causes of social or environmental justice.


Course Instructors

Chris Bond

Chris Bond

Unity College & McKay Farm and Research Station

 


PANELISTS

Bridget Meigs

Bridget Meigs

The Farm at Stonehill

 Gwyneth Harris

Gwyneth Harris

Sterling College

Bay Hammond

Bay Hammond

Green Mountain College



Gentle Flow Yoga

Angela Desrosiers - Yoga Instructor

Angela Desrosiers

Take a break during the Campus Farmer Summit with a gentle vinyasa flow class led by instructor Angela Desrosiers. All levels are welcome during this 30-minute practice designed to awaken and energize you through a guided flow, synchronizing breath and movement. You'll head back to the summit feeling refreshed and ready for the afternoon!