Advance Your Professional Development

Are you interested in Stonehill’s graduate teacher education programs but not sure you’re ready for an advanced degree?

Our non-degree option gives you the unique opportunity to take up to two graduate-level courses this summer to get to know Stonehill before formally applying to a degree program. Credits earned count toward your degree if you decide to matriculate in the program. Educators can also earn 67.5 PDPs for completing a single graduate course. 

Whether you're seeking a teaching license or master's degree, or you wish to advance your professional development with a single course, Stonehill can help you reach your goals. 

Fall 2024 Online Course Offerings

This course introduces students to the reality of schools as diverse spaces encompassing a range of student needs and examine efforts to ensure equity in education. Issues of race, class, culture, language, gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, and ability will be discussed and examined, especially how they intersect to reproduce inequality. Students will reflect on individual beliefs in relation to social justice education and democratic education and examine unintended consequences of policy/practice that create or perpetuate inequitable environments and opportunities in schools. Strategies for promoting educational equity and inclusivity will be discussed.

This course will meet online on Thursdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from October 21 through December 15. 

This course examines and unpacks contemporary issues in the field of education and provides prospective teachers with a beginning foundation for understanding the teaching profession and the U.S. education system, including policy and governance. The historical, legal, ethical, and pedagogical foundations for social justice education and democratic education will be explored, as well as the education reform context and emerging policies. The course will include an examination of professional ethics and standards. 

This course will meet online on Thursdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from August 21 through October 13. 

This course provides class participants with an introduction to autism and neurodiversity, a grounding in the neurodiversity paradigm, and exposure to autistic self-advocates and perspectives. The course will include an examination of the sociopolitical context and the resulting ideals, conceptions, assumptionst and biases in education, media, and community. Course participants will unpack educational discourse, diagnosis, labels, and the ethics of different educational approaches and ideals. The course will explore tenets of collaboration and the complexity of different organizational approaches.

This course will meet online on Tuesdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from August 27 through October 13. 

This course will explore communication and competence, from the highly to the minimally or non-verbal autistic student, and the theoretical foundations of speech, language and communication. The core skills of communication, communication reciprocity, core skills necessary for social communication and literacy development will be a focus. The course will examine frameworks for effective communication strategies and approaches, as well as the role of communication in social understanding/interaction and behavior. The impact of cultural values and beliefs on communication will be examined. Collaborative and interdisciplinary models of support and service delivery will be guided by self-advocate accounts.

This course will meet online on Mondays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from October 21 through December 15. 

Fall 2024 On-Campus Course Offerings

This graduate course focuses on the Individual Education Program (IEP) and the role of the special educator in the process, from pre-referral to eligibility determination and placement, as well as implementation. Federal and state laws related to special education will be explored. Collaboration, communication, building trust, and relationships with families and school/community colleagues will be an emphasis of the course.

This course will meet on campus on 9/7, 9/8, 10/5 and 10/6 from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. It runs from August 27 through October 13. 

This course explores literacy for young learners and provides participants with information on how to effectively teach literacy to all students. Course participants will learn how to design literacy lessons, utilizing universal design for learning and assessment practices, to create thriving readers and writers. Through this course, participants will learn about how to design and implement lessons focused on phonemic awareness, comprehension, oral reading fluency, and vocabulary. Additionally, course participants will learn pedagogical strategies for supporting young writers. Strategies to assess students’ literacy growth will also be addressed. 

This course will meet on campus on Tuesdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from August 27 through October 13. 

This course examines methods of teaching mathematics to diverse learners and contemporary methods of math assessment to ensure all students succeed mathematically. Course participants will develop instructional routines and apply standards in the design of curricula to improve how math can be humanized in classrooms. The course explores issues related to technology, math pedagogy, and math equity.

This course will meet on campus on Wednesdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from October 21 through December 15. 

This course explores language and literacy instruction for middle/high school students with disabilities. The course will emphasize how to design literacy lessons for diverse adolescent learners, including how to assess students’ literacy progress. Course participants will learn about the specific aspects of reading and explore how to support students’ needs in all areas. The course will provide participants with assessment strategies in literacy. Participants will also learn specific strategies to support students writing skills throughout all content areas.

This course will meet on campus on Tuesdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from August 27 through October 13. 

This course examines the pedagogy of math instruction for middle and high school aged diverse students. The course will explore instructional strategies and routines to support all learners to develop mathematical thinking. Participants will develop instructional routines and apply standards in the design of curricula to improve how math can be humanized in classrooms. The course explores issues related to technology, math pedagogy, and math equity. 

This course will meet on campus on Wednesdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from October 21 through December 15. 

This course will disability through the lens of democratic education. The concepts of equity, ableism, and “othering” will be examined through philosophical educational theories to unpack pervasive disagreement about the best methods for improving outcomes for students with disabilities. The course will explore repositioning schools as democratic spaces where diversity and individuality can be enhanced and better understood. Theories of democracy and democratic education will be explored as a means of a more socially just orientation of disability. 

This course will meet on campus on Mondays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from August 27 through October 13. 

This course focuses on race, religion, culture, and language through the lens of social justice education. This course will unpack bias and explore the diverse ways in which power and traditional structures intersect with different cultural, social, and religious practices. We will examine strategies for designing and creating safety in classrooms, schools, educational spaces, and communities which honor students’ cultural backgrounds and lived experiences. The course will explicitly examine privilege, equity, and cultural responsiveness in educational spaces.

This course will meet on campus on Mondays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from October 21 through December 15. 

This three-credit course provides an in depth look at the teaching and learning of science in the middle school (grades 5-8). Students will acquire an understanding of the content (Earth & Space Science, Life Science, Physical Science, Technology & Engineering) and practices of middle school science along with highly effective instructional practices for teaching science to early adolescents. This course is centered around inquiry learning, and authentic assessment for science in the middle school. 

This course will meet on campus on Tuesdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from October 21 through December 15. 

This three-credit course provides an in depth look at the teaching and learning of mathematics in the middle school (grades 5-8). Students will acquire an understanding of the content (ratio and proportionality; expressions and equations; statistics and probability; the number system; geometry; and functions) and practices of middle school mathematics along with highly effective instructional practices for teaching mathematics to early adolescents. This course is centered around high leverage routines, problem-based learning, and authentic assessment for mathematics in the middle school. 

This course will meet on campus on Tuesdays from 4:30–8:00 p.m. It runs from August 27 through October 13. 

This three-credit course provides an opportunity to unpack the perspective of various academic content areas through action/inquiry research. This course will assist teacher candidates in developing professional voice through the inquiry process. Inquiry and action research provides educators, administrators, and community leaders a method to study classroom challenges using an emic, or “insiders” perspective in order to investigate and improve their practice. This course will provide teacher candidates with the knowledge and skills needed to use action/inquiry research as a basis to make curricular and instructional decisions both school-wide and at the classroom level, and develop an action research project to address a school or classroom issue. 

This course will meet on campus on Thursdays from 4:30–7:00 p.m. It runs from August 27 through December 15. 

Fall 2024 Course Offerings in Boston

This graduate course focuses on the Individual Education Program (IEP) and the role of the special educator in the process, from pre-referral to eligibility determination and placement, as well as implementation. Federal and state laws related to special education will be explored. Collaboration, communication, building trust, and relationships with families and school/community colleagues will be an emphasis of the course.

This course will meet in person at our off-campus location in Boston on  11/2, 11/3, 12/7 and 12/8 from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. It runs from October 21 to December 15. 

This three-credit course addresses issues in the assessment of children and youth with disabilities, and reviews norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessments, developmental scales, and formal and informal observation techniques. Students will acquire an understanding of the issues related to selecting and administering a variety of assessment tools, and to interpreting, communicating and utilizing data from assessments to support the education of students with disabilities.

This course will meet in person at our off-campus location in Boston on 8/24, 8/25, 10/5 and 10/6 from 8 a.m.– 5 p.m. It runs from August 27 to October 13. 

Fall 2024 Course Offerings on Cape Cod

This course explores literacy for young learners and provides participants with information on how to effectively teach literacy to all students. Course participants will learn how to design literacy lessons, utilizing universal design for learning and assessment practices, to create thriving readers and writers. Through this course, participants will learn about how to design and implement lessons focused on phonemic awareness, comprehension, oral reading fluency, and vocabulary. Additionally, course participants will learn pedagogical strategies for supporting young writers. Strategies to assess students’ literacy growth will also be addressed. 

This course will meet in person at our off-campus location on Cape Cod on 8/24, 8/25, 10/5, and 10/6 from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. It runs from August 27 through October 13. 

This course examines methods of teaching mathematics to diverse learners and contemporary methods of math assessment to ensure all students succeed mathematically. Course participants will develop instructional routines and apply standards in the design of curricula to improve how math can be humanized in classrooms. The course explores issues related to technology, math pedagogy, and math equity.

This course will meet in person at our off-campus location on Cape Cod on 11/2, 11/3, 12/7 and 12/8 from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. It runs from October 21 to December 15. 

This course explores language and literacy instruction for middle/high school students with disabilities. The course will emphasize how to design literacy lessons for diverse adolescent learners, including how to assess students’ literacy progress. Course participants will learn about the specific aspects of reading and explore how to support students’ needs in all areas. The course will provide participants with assessment strategies in literacy. Participants will also learn specific strategies to support students writing skills throughout all content areas.

This course will meet in person at our off-campus location on Cape Cod on 8/24, 8/25, 10/5 and 10/6 from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. It runs from August 27 to October 13. 

This course examines the pedagogy of math instruction for middle and high school aged diverse students. The course will explore instructional strategies and routines to support all learners to develop mathematical thinking. Participants will develop instructional routines and apply standards in the design of curricula to improve how math can be humanized in classrooms. The course explores issues related to technology, math pedagogy, and math equity.

This course will meet in person at our off-campus location on Cape Cod on 11/2, 11/3, 12/7 and 12/8 from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. It runs from October 21 to December 15. 

Graduate Teacher Education Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the graduate teacher education programs are calculated on a per-credit basis. Additional fees may apply. 

Tuition Rate Per Credit
Cost per credit hour $763
Skyhawk Rate
(Applicable to alumni, employees and approved partners)
$610

Meet the Director

Rebekah Louis

director of graduate teacher education
Rebekah Louis, Ed.D., has taught in higher education for nearly a decade, drawing upon her many years of experience as a teacher in the public schools. Her research focuses on the clinical experience aspect of teacher preparation, including investigating how technology use in clinical preparation impacts teacher candidates’ experiences and the impact of placement factors on teacher candidates’ clinical experiences.

Contact us with any questions.

Graduate & Professional Studies Admission assists students as they explore graduate and professional opportunities offered at Stonehill College.