Who are the students of color?

At Stonehill, students of color are individuals who identify as Black, African American, Latinx/a/o, Hispanic, Asian, Pacific Islander, Desi, Native American, Middle Eastern, bi/multiracial, and other non-White racial groups.

Why do we use the term “students of color” as opposed to “minority” student?

Simply put, the word “minority” is pejorative when referring to “students of color.” Using the word “minority” when referring to students of color also has political connotations — i.e. the majority holds the power, while the minority is powerless. We, at Stonehill, are a community that strives to be more equitable and inclusive; moving away from the word “minority” as a race description will help our community be stronger, more attractive, and more inclusive to people of all types of backgrounds.

Race-Based Programming

Each year, National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15th to October 15th by celebrating the histories, cultures, and contributions of individuals whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America. The observation started in 1986 as Hispanic Heritage Week and then was expanded in 1988 to cover a 30-day period. For more information please visit: https://hispanicheritagemonth.gov

Each year, the month of November is observed to help gain recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the United States. For more information please visit: https://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is an American federal holiday marking the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year. King is known for his nonviolent activism in the Civil Rights Movement. A campaign for a federal holiday in King’s honor began soon after his assassination in 1968.

Black History Month is a month dedicated to raise awareness of African American’s contribution to American civilization. Originally started as Negro History Week in 1925 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. By 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life. Celebration expanded to a month in 1976. For more information please visit: https://africanamericanhistorymonth.gov

A celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. The month of May was chosen to honor the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7th 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10th, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants. In 1992, May was officially designated as Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month. For more information please visit: https://asianpacificheritage.gov