Reflections

  • There is no accounting for desire.
  • In contemporary Continental philosophy there is far too much talk about the distance of the 'other.' Do these authors not take to heart Heidegger's analysis of Miteinandersein--our being-with-one-another?
  • To live wisely and well, we need not the certainty of Abraham, nor the willfulness of Zarathustra, but the discernment of Odysseus.
  • Heidegger makes more complex--but does not mock--our understanding of the phenomenon of "truth."
  • The thinking that qualifies as wisdom gathers and does not seize. Consider more carefully what Heidegger means: thinking is thanking.
  • Let all things come to be and cease to be, including ourselves.
  • Care for other beings, but give them leeway, too.
  • Life teaches us that the subject of consciousness is not the self.
  • Is it that the artist dwells more in the imaginary than the thinker? And yet both disclose what is.
  • Why traditionally was there such philosophical resistance to our temporal existence?
  • Simple things give us hope.
  • The Greeks understood that limit is necessary for happiness.
  • Allow for what cannot be changed--but in a creative way.
  • All too often today, philosophy wields the hammer of thought to tear down rather than to build up.
  • Some change is better than no change at all.
  • "It is fitting for a man, even if he is wise, often to learn things . . . . It is also good to learn from those who give good counsel." Sophocles, Antigone
  • A wise man wears knowledge lightly.
  • Education should liberate our individuality, not smother it; it should make us bold to imagine change and progress for ourselves and for others; it should lead us beyond competence to creativity; and it should touch us and stir us in some profound way.
  • Why did so many philosophers miss the decisive importance of our mortality?
  • Eros builds in time.
  • Completion, not perfection, is our goal.
  • Living when the sky is high requires as much wisdom as when the sky hangs heavy with snow.