Matthew C. Borushko


My scholarly interests include the literature of the Romantic Age in Britain (1789-1832); poetry and poetics; the work of Theodor Adorno and Jacques Ranciere; and the intellectual history of nonviolence. In both my teaching and my research, I explore the relationship of the aesthetic to forms of the political and the historical and thereby seek to enable dialogue across disciplines and historical periods.

I am currently working on two books. The first, Shelley's Romantic Nonviolence: Aesthetics and Politics in an Age of Revolution, establishes a relationship between Shelley's imagining of a politics of nonviolence and his theory and practice of art. Selections from this project have appeared in the Keats-Shelley Journal in 2010 and in Studies in Romanticism in 2013. The second project, Romanticism Against History, reads the Romantic movement in Britain as a critique of the emergent forms of history and historical understanding in post-Enlightenment Europe.  An essay drawn from this project appeared in ELH: the essay concerns the Ismail cantos of Byron's Don Juan.


Edited Volumes

The Politics of Shelley: History, Theory, Form. Romantic Circles Praxis Series (October 2015). 


“Aesthetics of Nonviolence: Shelley, Adorno, Rancière.” The Politics of Shelley: History, Theory, Form, ed. Matthew C. Borushko, Romantic Circles Praxis Series (October 2015). Link.

“History, Historicism, and Agency at Byron’s Ismail.” ELH 81:1 (Spring 2014). Link.

 “The Politics of Subreption: Resisting the Sublime in Shelley’s ‘Mont Blanc.’” Studies in Romanticism 52: 2 (Summer 2013): 225-252. pdf.

“Violence and Nonviolence in Shelley’s Mask of Anarchy.Keats-Shelley Journal LIX (2010): 93-113. pdf.

 “‘A nation or a world’: Patriotism in Shelley.” Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empires, Bodies, Rhetoric, ed. Orrin N. C. Wang, Romantic Circles Praxis Series (May 2005). Link.

 “Percy Bysshe Shelley and the Sciences.” Literature Compass 2 (2005): 1-6. Link.

Selected Awards

Annual Essay Prize, Keats-Shelley Association of America, 2013: awarded for "The Politics of Subreption: Resisting the Sublime in Shelley's 'Mont Blanc.'"

Carl H. Pforzheimer, Jr. Research Grant, Keats-Shelley Association of America, 2013.


  • Ph.D., Boston University
  • B.A., University of Michigan