Anthropology

Course Description

This course involves an in-depth exploration of Latin American and Caribbean culture, both historically and today. We will be investigating the interdependence between economically developed and lesser developed parts of the Latin America, the Caribbean, and other regions of the world. Students will be presented with an anthropological perspective on a range of issues related to the region, using primary cultural documents and ethnographic works to more deeply understand specific Latin American populations. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Linnea M. Carlson

Business

Course Description

Fundamental principles and theories of financial accounting. Emphasis placed on the preparation and use of financial statements for the corporation. Interpretation and use of financial statement information in business decisions, and a study of the system that produces this information. Open to Business majors and minors, Entrepreneurship minors and Arts Administration majors.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Marie Solange Lopez

Course Description

This course introduces the students to the economic, political, and cultural environments affecting international business. In addition, the influence of government on trade, foreign direct investment, foreign exchange, export and import strategies, and the impact of multinational enterprises will be discussed. Students will also be exposed to the comprehensive set of dynamics that comprise international business decision environments and will learn to evaluate alternative courses of action in a global setting. Particular emphasis will be placed on areas of current importance. Extensive use of cases and readings. Open to Business majors and minors and Political Science & International Studies majors.

Credits: 3 Credit Hours

Instructor: Jennifer A. Swanson

Course Description

This course is designed to allow students to understand how marketing has changed because of new media and technology.  Through business case studies of Beyonce, Major League Baseball, New York Times, Netflix, Metropolitan Opera, Nike, Disney and the like, students will appreciate the opportunities and challenges brought on by new media in various industries, such as sports, consumer packaged goods, news, movies, music, advertising, retail and streaming videos. Students will learn to develop integrated media strategies for a real business client. Because an understanding of new media is essential to company’s overall business strategy, this course will equip students with knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in today’s fast-changing business world.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Xin Wang

Computer Science

Course Description

This course explores the history of information technology and its impact on our society. It provides students with the background to understand these changes and the tools they need to manage them, as well as a strong foundation in research, critical thinking, and oral and written communication skills.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Heather B. Perry

Criminology

Course Description

This course involves the study of crime victims and their experiences with the Criminal Justice System, with some focus on intimate partner violence and its history as a social problem. Additionally, time is spent on victims from marginalized sub-groups (those living in rural areas; ethnic minorities; LGBTQ community, children, elders, the disabled) who have a difficult time seeking justice through the courts. Pre-requisite: CRM 120 or CRM 201.

Credits: 3 Credit Hours

Instructor: Kathleen Currul-Dykeman

Economics

Course Description

Economic analysis of product and resource markets. The consumption behavior of households, the price and output decisions of firms under various forms of market structure, the distribution of income.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Piyush Chandra

English

Course Description

This seminar explores the literature of islands. This will be a semester-long inquiry into how the unique conditions of island living shape literature and culture. We will study texts about castaways, pirates, tourists, islanders, and adventurers in order to discern what makes stories about islands so compelling and enduring. Fulfills the Cornerstone Literature Requirement.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Scott A. Cohen

Healthcare Administration

Course Description

Examines the parts of the healthcare system in the U.S. and stresses the patient and family as the primary focus of the system. Who are the players in health services? What are the structures of the system and the behaviors of the system participants, and how does our present system prevent meaningful reform?

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Larry A. Lencz

History

Course Description

Comprehensive study of American historical development with a focus on the development of U.S. political principles, ideals, founding documents, institutions, and processes. Topics include modes of colonial life, geographical perspectives, the Revolution and Constitution, urban development, westward movement, constructions of race and gender, popular culture, the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Todd S. Gernes

Interdisciplinary Studies

Course Description

This introductory course will explore the concepts of health behavior and general nutrition as it applies to helping individuals adopt healthy lifestyles. Theories of health behavior will be introduced to help explain how and why decisions are made regarding preventative health behaviors. We will discuss topics such as healthy diets, stress management, physical activity, eating disorders, mental health issues and tobacco and learn how to address these behaviors through current theories and research. May not receive credit for both BIO 118 and IND 201. Does not count as a course towards Biology, Biochemistry and Neuroscience majors.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Jessica T. Greene

Mathematics

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the basics of probability theory using the R statistical programming language.  Topics include: probability spaces, conditional probability and independence, random variables, discrete probability distributions, continuous probability distributions, and modern data generating and sampling methods using R and RStudio.

Credits: 2 Credit hours

Instructor: Eugene P. Quinn

Political Science

Course Description

An exploration of the formation of foreign policy, the structure and processes of international systems, patterns of conflict, economic and security issues, and institutions and processes of conflict resolution.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Anwar Mahajna

Psychology

Course Description

Examination of theories related to sport, team behavior and sport cognition, and how psychological and social factors affect performance, behavior, and coaching. Topics include: Motivation, Coaching, Team Dynamics, Mental skills and Performance Enhancement, Confidence, Drug Use and Eating Disorders in Sport, and Youth Sport. Pre-requisite: PSY 101.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: David B. Hurley

Religious Studies & Theology

Course Description

What makes a medieval monastery different from a modern-day brewery or gym? What is religion? What is secularism? This course covers medieval and modern religions through critical reading of texts, films, and artwork drawn primarily from Christianity, but also neighboring traditions (Judaism, indigenous religions) and modern movements (science, nation-building). Prerequisite(s)/Restriction(s): RST 129 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Craig H. Tichelkamp

Course Description

This course explores how religious traditions address moral issues, paying particular attention to assumptions about human nature and the good, the bases on which the traditions being studied generates arguments about specific issues, that system’s modes of moral argumentation, and its applicability to contemporary issues. In particular, we will consider how Christian concepts of morality: 

  • Developed in interaction with preceding and contemporary traditions 
  • Responded to critical social questions in the past 
  • Continue to evolve in response to critical social issues in the present 

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Daniel Charles Ullucci

Visual and Performing Arts

Course Description

Teaches very basic use of watercolor and explores its potential. Each class will focus on skills such as: materials preparation, wet-on-wet and dry brush techniques, lifting color, basic color theory, value, glazing and composition. A visual survey of current artists working in the medium will be presented throughout the course.

Credits: 3 Credit hours

Instructor: Shane Savage-Rumbaugh

Writing

Course Description

This course will focus on enhancing students’ abilities to critically analyze and respond to public messages found in political speaking, public advocacy, popular culture, and visual and new media narratives that appear throughout the digital world. Students will learn and apply effective writing techniques throughout the term and explore both on-line and traditional prose styles. Pre-requisite(s): Completion of the First-Year-Seminar requirement.

Credits: 4 Credit hours

Instructor: Heidi R. Sadler