Psychology, B.A. Requirements

Department Chairperson:Michael E. Tirrell

Office: Shields Science Center 203

Phone: 508-565-1210
mtirrell@stonehill.edu

Students, in consultation with their psychology faculty advisors, will design their own sequence. Examples of sequences students can design include school psychology sequence, clinical psychology sequence, industrial-organizational psychology sequence, graduate school experimental psychology sequence, Masters level counseling psychology sequence, etc. The students' choices should be guided by their present and future goals.

The major in Psychology requires the completion of eleven courses.

Complete Three Required Courses

Code Course Credits

PSY 101

General Psychology     (prerequisite for all other courses except PSY 261)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Principles underlying physiological psychology, learning, perception, altered states of consciousness, human development, human memory and emotion, personality, social behavior, intelligence, and the behavior disorders.

3

PSY 261

Introduction to Statistics

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Examines statistical techniques as used in the behavioral sciences. Topics include: descriptive statistics - measures of central tendency and variability; inferential statistics - principles of hypothesis testing, z test, t test, simple ANOVA, correlation and introduction to regression, and chi square. Statistical analysis software complements use of computational formulae.

3

PSY 271

Research Methods in Psychology (WID)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Examines the research methods used in Psychology including naturalistic observation, field and laboratory experiments, and survey methods. Discusses ethical standards in research, and critiques research articles. Students design, implement, write-up, and present research study at the College's poster session.

4
It is recommended that PSY 261 and PSY 271 be completed in consecutive semesters by the end of the first semester of the Junior year.

Complete Five Additional Courses

Code Course Credits

PSY 201

Developmental Psychology I

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Study of child development from conception through preadolescence. It emphasizes an understanding of developmental research methods and theories and examines the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, personality and moral aspects of development.

3
PSY 203 - Developmental Psychology II

PSY 205

Theories of Personality

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Surveys the Psychoanalytic, the Neo-Analytic, the Biological, the Existential, the Cognitive, and Trait-Factor approaches to the study of personality. Comparative analysis and case study application of the major constructs as presented in the works of various theorists.

3

PSY 207

Abnormal Psychology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Course employs the DSM-V system of classifying and describing emotional dysfunctioning. It explores the etiology, course, and treatment of major disorders. Dynamics and treatment modalities are approached from the psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and existential models. Examination of research and case studies, and a possible practicum experience.

3

PSY 209

Social Psychology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Problems, concepts, and methods in the study of social behavior; including conformity, attitude development and change, interpersonal attraction, group processes, and social cognition.

3

PSY 305

Theories of Learning

Offered: Fall Semester

Surveys the functionalistic, associationistic and cognitive schools of learning - applying constructs such as limits, incentives, practice, insight, transfer, and memory to education, child rearing, and adjustment therapy.

3

PSY 415

Brain and Behavior

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Structure and function of nerve cells and the nervous system. Research methods in biopsychology, effects of brain damage, physiological principles underlying sleep, eating, abnormal behavior, drug effects, and memory.

3

PSY 419

Cognitive Psychology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Examination of the principles of cognition. Among the topics discussed are perception, attention, working memory, long-term memory, imagery, language, problem solving, reasoning, and judgment and decision-making. Includes a laboratory component which gives students hands-on experience with cognitive phenomena discussed in class.

3

Complete Two Elective Psychology Courses

Students can take any two 200, 300 or 400-level Psychology courses including:

Complete a Capstone in Psychology

Code Course Credits

PSY 450

Advanced Psychology Seminar

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Capstone course in which students will review and synthesize major empirical/theoretical areas of psychology, including abnormal, personality, learning, cognition, social, developmental, statistics and physiological.

3
Note: PSY 442 - Advanced Research Externship II will count as a PSY elective.

Internships

Although Internships are not required, many majors choose to complete one. Any Junior and Senior Psychology majors with GPA's of 3.00 or greater desiring to enroll in either PSY 475 - Internship in Applied Psychology I or PSY 476 - Internship in Applied Psychology II must schedule an appointment with Dr. Shani Turner, the Director of Psychology Department Internships, prior to completing any Internship Application paperwork or contacting any placement sites. The meeting should take place during the last month of the semester preceding the semester during which the internship will be completed. In addition to completing 120 hours of field placement for a three credit internship, students will be expected to submit professional journal entries weekly and to meet periodically both individually and in group settings with Dr. Turner. Readings and additional writing assignments will be assigned as necessary in order to enhance performance at the placement.

Only one Internship may be included as part of the courses needed to fulfill the major.