Political Science & International Studies Courses

Code Course Credits

POL 101

Model United Nations

Offered: Spring Semester

This one credit course prepares students to participate in the annual four-day National Model United Nations (NMUN) conference in New York City in late March. The course prepares students to participate in Stonehill College's delegation to NMUN to represent effectively and knowledgeably the delegation's country assignment.

This course is letter graded and may be taken a maximum of four times.

1

POL 110

Power, Order, and Justice (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall 2017

This course will explore the dilemmas facing all governments: on what principles should the political order be based? What is the nature of the just state? What determines citizenship, political authority, and power? What is the good life and how is it related to the political order and the satisfaction of justice?

Equivalent to POL 171. May not take both.

4

POL 123

American Government and Politics

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The primary goal of this introductory course is to provide a broad understanding of governmental institutions and political behavior in the United States. This course covers the development of institutions and ideas from the founding era, the interaction among institutions and between the levels of government in the formulation and implementation of public policy, and the impact of citizens and groups on the American political system.

3

POL 143

International Politics

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An exploration of the formation of foreign policy, the structure and processes of international systems, patterns of conflict, economic and security issues, and institutions and processes of conflict resolution.

3

POL 171

Power, Order, and Justice

Offered: Spring Semesters

The dilemmas facing all governments: On what principles should the political order be based? What is the nature of the just state? What determines citizenship, political authority and power? What is the good life, and how is it related to the political order; and the satisfaction of justice?

Equivalent to POL 110. May not take both.

3

POL 201

College Mock Trial

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course prepares you to participate in the American Mock Trial Association collegiate mock trial competition as a member of the team representing Stonehill College. Topics covered include developing a case theory, drafting opening statements and closing arguments, conducting direct and cross examinations, and making and responding to evidentiary objections.

Course may be taken a total of six times.

1

POL 210

Research Methods in Political Science (WID)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course provides an introduction to the methods that political scientists use to answer questions. Students will learn analytical tools to critically evaluate and conduct research. The course will cover research design, hypothesis formulation, and various qualitative and quantitative methods for collecting and analyzing data.

Previously offered as POL 310.

4

POL 221

Education Policy and Politics

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An in depth investigation of the political dynamics and policy challenges in American education. This course explores the history and purpose of education, problems facing U.S. public education within an increasingly globally competitive world, governance structures, education finance, and specific education policy issues, standards and accountability, among others.

3

POL 222

Political Ideologies

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017, 2019

An introduction to Western political ideologies: basic philosophical concepts, the theory of democracy and its critics, and various political ideologies including conservatism, fascism, feminism, liberalism, Marxism, and socialism.

3

POL 233

Law, Politics, and Society

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines law in practice with a focus on how individuals operate within and against the legal system. It explores the nature of law, its impact on the everyday lives of people, the judicial process, the art of legal reasoning, and the role of courts in initiating, directing, and resisting social change.

3

POL 234

Comparing States

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The variations in political systems of states will be explored in terms of state-society relations. Types of democratic and authoritarian systems will be investigated, as well as conditions of their consolidation, change or transformation. In addition, the role of such forces as political protest and participation, ideologies and civil society on shaping politics and policy outcomes will be explored through comparative case studies of countries around the world.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

POL 235

American Political Thought

Offered: Fall 2017

An exploration of the basic structure, values, and theoretical foundations of the American republic and its political development. The creation and definition of American political thinking in the works of Locke, Jefferson, Madison, Tocqueville, Calhoun, Lincoln, and others.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 245

American Foreign Policy

Offered: Spring Semester

The interplay between American interests and the international political system is examined in terms of decision-making, political pressures, ethical considerations, a changing security agenda, patterns of cooperation and conflict, trade and aid, human rights and resource distribution.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 247

Elections in America

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2016, 2018

Elections are the signature events of American democracy and provide a mechanism to ensure democratic accountability. This course examines how elections in America are structured and how political parties shape the electoral system. The course also examines how interest groups, the media, and money impact electoral dynamics.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 255

Environmental Policy and Politics

Offered: Spring Semester

Global climate change, mass extinctions, polluted waterways, hazardous waste dumps, oil spills, and nuclear meltdowns. Concerns about the health and integrity of the environment have garnered much attention since the 1960s. This course examines the nature and extent of public policy-making that addresses these and other environmental issues.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 277

Global Wealth, Power and Poverty

Offered: Fall Semesters

The course examines the global clash and coexistence between states and markets. It explores sources of poverty and inequality in developing world. As a political economy course, it investigates globalization of trade, finance and production. Study of global policy tools to address poverty and promote growth in an increasingly global world concludes the course. An emphasis is placed on the World Bank, the IMF and multinational corporations in world politics and economy.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

POL 280

Introduction to Public Policy

Offered: Fall Semester

The course examines the roles that values play in the making of public policy, considers why some problems reach the public agenda, and why some policies succeed. Using a variety of policy problems, students will hone their ability to analyze complex issues and develop concise reports of their findings and recommendations.

Course formerly offered as POL 351 Public Policy Analysis. Students may not take both POL 280 and POL 351.

3

POL 329

Campaigns: History, Practices, Communication

Offered: Spring Semester

Political communication is as old as civilization. When a group gathers, leaders emerge, and how they got there, and how they maintain their leadership, their power, is a function of political communication. We will focus on American political communication throughout American history with heavy emphasis on communication in the television era and how political speech evolved (or devolved) from formal language, biblical reference and hour plus speeches to television ads, sound bites and twitter bombs.

3

POL 331

Global Security Studies

Offered: Fall Semester

The causes of war, military history with the interplay of strategy, technology and politics as the central focus, the nuclear threat and terrorism in the contemporary period. Prevention and the limitation of war and the moral and legal restraints on the activities of states are explored.

3

POL 332

The American Presidency

Offered: Spring Semester

The origins and growth of the American presidency, the Executive office, and its occupant, the relationship between the office and democratic government, the separation of powers and divided party government, and on the expansion of public administration during the twentieth century.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 333

Contemporary Political Theory

Offered: Spring Semester

This course explores contemporary political theory from the perspective of core political concepts such as liberty, rights, and democracy. What does it mean to be free in a modern society? What does it mean to have rights, and what rights should individuals have? What does democratic theory expect of citizens?

3

POL 334

Man, Woman, War: Gender and Defining (In)Security

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2016, 2018

How does gender impact the study of insecurity, particularly that caused by political conflict? How do the state and the military construct norms of femininity and masculinity? This course will draw on interdisciplinary research from political science and international studies as well as from feminist philosophy and gender studies to explore how gender informs our understanding of experiences of insecurity and what security ought to entail.

Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies programs.

3

POL 336

Constitutional Law and Politics

Offered: Fall Semester

This course focuses on the structural form and institutional powers of American government. The central purpose of the course is to explore the question of constitutional interpretation. Who are the authoritative interpreters of the Constitution, what is the relationship between them, and what interpretive methodology should they employ?

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 337

Public Administration

Offered: Spring Semester

Administration of public affairs; how public policy is put into effect by government bureaucracies; theories of government organizations; the political setting of bureaucracies; problems of budgeting and personnel; efficient and humane conduct of public business.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 339

Latin American Politics

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2018, 2020

This course introduces students to politics and issues in modern Latin America. It develops a comparative framework to understand Latin American democracies and pays particular attention to the so-called "Third Wave of Democracy."

Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program.

3

POL 340

European Politics

Offered: Fall Semester

The history, political structures, and politics of the major nations of Europe, the political ideologies and policies of Great Britain, Germany, France, and Italy. The European Union is central to the course and its expanding membership and deepening responsibilities are explored.

3

POL 341

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2017, 2019

The primary goal of this course is to provide a broad understanding of the civil liberties and civil rights enjoyed by persons in the United States. The course explores the historical evolution of rights and liberties and their application to current controversies. The course covers freedom of religion, freedom of speech, the right to privacy, freedom from cruel and unusual punishments, protections against discrimination, and affirmative action.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 345

Inequality, Poverty, and American Democracy

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Democracy is based on the ideal of political equality. Yet inequality is an undeniable feature of American society. How do inequity and poverty affect the working of American democracy? This seminar examines the nature and extent of poverty in the U.S., its causes and consequences, and the antipoverty effects of existing and proposed government programs and policies.

3

POL 346

Immigration and the American Ideal

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course will consider the topic of immigration from a human rights perspective, particularly following the events of 9/11. After offering students a brief overview of U.S. immigration law and those responsible for implementing it, classes will examine issues of migrants, immigration reform, deportation, and the role of state and federal authorities.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 347

Conflict Analysis and Resolution

Offered: Fall Semester

The course examines sources and types of conflict and conditions of sustainable peace between and within communities or states. It also surveys the research on implementation and efficacy of third party interventions in such conflicts as used by international and regional organizations and great powers. Tools examined include arbitration, mediation, negotiation and dialogue groups. Specific protracted conflicts will be investigated.

Students registered for this course are eligible to apply for the Learning Inside Out (LION) international internship and professional development program.

3

POL 348

Peace and Conflict Studies

Offered: Spring Semester

As an introduction to the field of Peace and Conflict Studies, the course examines sources of war and violence as well as the conditions of sustainale, just or positive peace. Some of the sources of violent conflict covered include the nature of political systems, levels of economic development, ethnic and racial identities. Specific cases of international conflicts will be examined.

3

POL 352

Transitions to Democracy and Building Democracy

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course considers hurdles and obstacles facing countries transitioning to democracy. We study the literature on the topic and explore several cases of democratic transition and consolidation. We focus on constitution engineering and stability in post-conflict situations with weak economic development and inadequate infrastructure, corruption, and ethnic tension.

Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

POL 353

International Law and Organizations

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2014, 2016

Explores the extent to which international organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank are able to alter the contours of statehood and state sovereignty and whether such international organizations serve or dominate state actors. Case studies are Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Iraq.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors.

3

POL 354

Irish Politics

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

The development of Irish nationalism, the creation of the Irish state in 1922, and the building of the Irish state. Economic development, Church-state relations, and education are explored as well as unsolved puzzle of the Irish nation and state, Northern Ireland.

3

POL 355

Politics of East Asia

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course provides an introduction to the methods that political scientists use to answer questions. Students will learn analytical tools to critically evaluate and conduct research. The course will cover research design, hypothesis formulation, and various qualitative and quantitative methods for collecting and analyzing data. Students will also construct a research design for a political science topic of interest to them.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

POL 356

Politics of the Middle East

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course will focus on the Arab-Israeli conflict and relationships among the Arab states; the roll of the major powers in the Middle East's consideration of ideas and political manifestations of nationalism, the impact of imperialism, problems of development, and politics of oil, finally, the impact of ethnicity, tribalism culture and religion in explaining politic in the Middle Eastern states.

Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

POL 357

Topics in Politics

Offered: Spring Semesters

From time to time, faculty members may offer a special course in their field of expertise. The course engages in analysis of selected topics in one of the four area fields of the discipline: Political Theory; American Government; Comparative Politics; and International Relations.

3

POL 358

Massachusetts State Politics

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A study of the organization, powers, processes and politics of state government in Massachusetts. Topics will include Massachusetts history, political institutions, budgeting, political leaders, and contemporary issues in the state.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 360

The United States Congress

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores the politics of the U.S. Congress. Emphasis is placed on representation, the legislative process, and policy making. Congressional organization, namely committee systems and party leadership, are also examined to gain a deeper understanding of Congressional decision-making.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 380

Dirty Hands: Moral Dilemmas

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2014, 2016

The difficult "problem of dirty hands" that is making morally unpalatable choices when confronting mutually exclusive and competing ethical claims. Works of modern political philosophy and classic literature explore some possible responses to such problems.

3

POL 381

Citizens of the World

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2015, 2017

This course introduces students to ongoing debates within contemporary cosmopolitan political theory over what is morally required of us as our world increasingly becomes globally interconnected. Applications of cosmopolitan theory to real world dilemmas such as how to respond to crimes against humanity and how to assess actions of transnational non-governmental associations will be explored.

3

POL 382

Parties and Interest Groups in American Politics

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters (in Washington, DC)

The course will explore internal incentive structures of political organizations, including business, professional, trade union and "public interest" groups. The course also examines the processes by which democratic politics enables groups to influence national political institutions. Taught in Washington D.C., the course includes opportunities for students to visit and meet with numerous interest groups working to influence public policy.

Course taken as part of the Semester in Washington, D.C. program.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 383

Environmental Justice

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2017, 2019

This course explores how the environment relates to social justice. How are environmental challenges in the United States as well as internationally connected to deep structural injustices related to class, race and gender? We will read moral philosophy and political theory as well as social scientific and historical research. Then we will apply the theories to a few cases of environmental injustice: hazardous waste disposal, food justice, climate change, and inter-generational justice.

3

POL 390

Politics in Washington, D.C.

Offered: Spring Semester

A series of seminars during the semester will focus on an in-depth study of power and politics in American government. During a two-week stay in Washington, D.C., students will combine traditional academic work with seminars with prominent individuals in government, journalism and the nonprofit sector.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 401

Political Science Honors Thesis I

Offered: Fall Semester

For accepted rising seniors, the Honors Program of Political Science and International Studies involves the writing of a thesis and a public defense. Each honors student works closely throughout a full academic year with the faculty member(s) best able to offer advice on the topic of the thesis. POL 401 consists of finalizing a literature review, outline, and initial draft of the thesis.

3

POL 402

Political Science Honors Thesis II

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

For accepted seniors, the Honors Program of Political Science and International Studies involves the writing of a thesis and a public defense. Each honors student works closely throughout a full academic year with the faculty member(s) best able to offer advice on the topic of the thesis. POL 402 consists of finishing the thesis and a public defense.

3

POL 410

Global Development and Security Studies

Offered: Spring and Summer

Part of the Learning Inside-Out Network (LION) program on Global Development and Security Studies, the course examines two often competing understandings of security. The traditional approach defines security purely as political-military defense of a state and its territory. Human security as an alternative highlights the economic welfare of individuals and their immediate communities. It departs from traditional formulations of security by stressing the social and economic causes of insecurity, often internal to states. Issues covered in the course range from environmental degradation, crime, armed conflict, poverty and economic disparities.

The program includes:

  • A three-week Summer Institute on Global Development and Security Studies, Armenia in June.
  • Participation in the International Conference on "Local Roots of Global Peace: Junior Voices in Global Security".
  • A one-credit International internship (POL 411) with a LION partner in Armenia or Serbia in July.
  • Study trips to four international NGOs and international organizations in Yerevan.
  • Cultural trips in Armenia to medieval monasteries and churches in the world's oldest Christian nation; Wings of Tatev, the world's longest aerial tram; visits to ancient wineries; and much more.

Course fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement. Program fees include tuition, housing internship placement services, conference in Yerevan, cultural trips, and flight from Yerevan to Belgrade* (Serbia placements only).

3

POL 411

Global Development and Security Studies Practicum

Offered: Spring and Summer

This practicum is linked to POL 410, the Global Development and Security Studies Summer Institute/course held in Armenia every June. Students in this practicum spend four weeks with an international NGO, a think-tank, or a media organization that are part of Stonehill College's Learning Inside-Out Network (LION) program in Armenia or Serbia.

Corequisite(s): Must also register for POL 410 - Global Development and Security Studies.

1

POL 422

Capstone Seminar

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The course examines central themes, problems, and issues in the four fields of the discipline (Political Theory, American Politics, International Relations, and Comparative Government).

3

POL 475

Internship in Political Science

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course centers on your participation in a work experience that relates to the study of politics. This course also calls upon you to critically examine and reflect upon your internship experience in journal entries and an academic essay.

Must complete the "U.S. Internship Request for Approval" process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship.

3

POL 490

Directed Study

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Supervised reading and research on selected topics.

3

POL 496

Independent Research

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Opportunity for a student to conduct research in a specialized area of Political Science and International Studies under the direction of a faculty member.

3