Middle Eastern Studies Minor Requirements

Program Director:
Shari Lowin
Office: Old Student Union 206
Phone: 508-565-1285
slowin@stonehill.edu

The minor in Middle Eastern Studies requires the completion of six courses.

Middle Eastern Courses

Complete at least Four Middle East Courses at the 200-Level or Above.

Code Course Credits

ARB 131

Elementary Arabic I

Offered: Fall Semester

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence introducing students to Modern Standard Arabic. By completing both semesters, students will reach the "novice high" proficiency level as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competence.

3

ARB 132

Elementary Arabic II

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is a continuation of ARB 131 - Elementary Arabic I.

3

ARB 231

Intermediate Arabic I

Offered: Fall Semester

This is the first course of the two-semester sequence in Modern Standard Arabic at the Intermediate level. By completing both semesters, students will reach the "Intermediate Mid-Level" in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

3

ARB 232

Intermediate Arabic II

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is continuation of ARB 231 - Intermediate Arabic I.

3

ARB 331

Advanced Arabic I

Offered: Fall Semester

In both semesters of Advanced Arabic, students build upon their previous knowledge and develop the ability to: speak simple dialogue of paragraph length; understand more authentic speech; write a series of coherent paragraphs; read authentic text to acquire information. The course integrates history and culture, as well as contemporary events and issues.

3

HIS 278

History of the Islamic World I

Offered: Not Offered 2017-2018

This course explores the historical development of Islamic societies from the pre-Islamic period to roughly 1500 CE. We will develop a nuanced understanding of cultural, intellectual, spiritual, political and economic themes important to the formation of classical Islamic civilization, through studying primary texts in translation, visual arts and contemporary scholarship.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies and Anthropology minors.

3

HIS 290

History of the Islamic World II

Offered: Not Offered 2017-2018

This course explores the historical development of Muslim societies from roughly 1500 CE to the present. We will develop a nuanced understanding of cultural, intellectual, spiritual, political and economic themes important to the contemporary Muslim world in its global context, through studying primary texts in translation, visual arts and contemporary scholarship.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies and Anthropology minors.

3

HIS 362

World History Seminar: Topical     (When Topic is Middle Eastern)

Offered: Fall Semester

Offers an opportunity to study a specific area or problem in World history in greater depth. Seminar format focusing on discussion of primary sources and secondary literature. Alternating topics to be announced prior to registration.

Considered a World History.

3

POL 356

Politics of the Middle East

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course will focus on the Arab-Israeli conflict and relationships among the Arab states; the roll of the major powers in the Middle East's consideration of ideas and political manifestations of nationalism, the impact of imperialism, problems of development, and politics of oil, finally, the impact of ethnicity, tribalism culture and religion in explaining politic in the Middle Eastern states.

Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

REL 206

Islamic Traditions

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017, 2019

Studies the Arabian environment, Muhammed (founder), Qur'an (sacred writings), and mysticism, sects, and legal and social institutions of Islam.

3

REL 209

Religion and Culture of the Jewish People

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2018, 2020

A survey of key texts, beliefs, and practices of Jewish culture and religious practice, including the Bible, classic texts, holidays and holy days, Zionism, modern American Jews, and Israel.

3

REL 275

Hard Rockin' Jews: Judaism and Pop Culture in Israel

Offered: Not Offered 2017-2018

For 2000 years Judaism has been a minority religion in majority "other" cultures. With the establishment of Israel, Judaism became the majority culture of a nation-state. This course examines how the religion of Judaism both influences and is influenced by the secular culture of the modern State of Israel.

3

REL 301

Islam and the Bible: Jewish and Muslim Morality and Ethics

Offered: Not Offered 2017-2018

As brother religions vying for the same sacred history, Islam and Judaism trace the genesis of their spiritual and biological communities back to the very same founding parents. Yet Islam is not Judaism, Muslims are not Jews, and vice versa. Rather, the two traditions are, and understand themselves to be, distinct entities with distinct value systems. By comparing the Jewish and Muslim accounts of the shared Biblical ancestors, as well the often colorful exegesis on these narratives, this course will investigate various matters of moral and ethical concern to these communities and the lessons thereby imparted by each tradition.

3

REL 312

Archaeology and the Bible

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduction to the archaeology of Palestine, with special focus on the interrelationship of excavated and textual data.

3

REL 317

Gods, Kings and Justice in the Ancient World

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2018, 2020

Who speaks for Justice? Where does Justice come from? This course examines these and related questions by analyzing and comparing ancient texts such as the Babylonian law code of Hammurabi, Egyptian hymns, Homer's Odyssey, and the biblical prophets. Ancient works of art treating issues of justice are also examined.

3

REL 336

Women in the Islamic Tradition

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2108, 2020

The treatment of women and women's issues in the Islamic tradition through both primary sources (in translation) and secondary sources: women in Muhammad's life and the role they played in Islamic society; the treatment of women and women-related issues in the Islamic tradition, including both legal and non-legal matters; and the writings of modern Muslim women scholars on Islam as they look at these same issues with a new perspective and present new interpretations.

3

REL 338

Sex and God: Love Songs in Medieval Spain

Offered: Not Offered 2017-2018

An examination of the secular love poetry penned by religious scholars of the 10th-13th centuries in medieval Spain. We will explore the ways in which these pious standard-bearers of religion used sacred images and accounts from the Bible/Qur'an and exegetical traditions in their secular love poems, to both male and female beloveds, and what messages were thus embedded.

3

REL 331

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I

Offered: Fall 2018

A systematic introduction to biblical Hebrew emphasizing grammar and vocabulary with the intention of reading short passages of biblical prose by the end of the semester. Daily preparation and active class participation mandatory.

3

SPA 352

Christians, Jews and Muslims of Spain: Medieval Minds in Modern English

Offered: Fall Semester

This course examines the representation of Christians, Jews, and Muslims; their societal roles; and their interactions as described in English translations of texts produced between the 13th and 16th centuries. Thematically, we will examine the Moorish invasion and the Spanish Reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula; laws governing how Christians, Jews, and Muslims were to interact in the Christian Kingdoms; the Cult of the Virgin; the connection between the waning Moorish presence in Spain and moralizing Christian literature /popular ballads idealizing this religious group; and the Inquisition. Literary genres include epic, narrative, and lyrical poetry (with special attention paid to Spain's Mester de Clerecía (the "cleric's craft"); historiography; jurisprudence; and didactic prose. To understand the complex relationship that existed between members of these three faiths, special attention also will be given to the socio-political, legal, and cultural milieu of the Iberian Peninsula.

Course is taught in English. Does not count towards the Dual Language or Spanish major or minor. Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement. Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

SPA 353

Christians, Jews, and Muslims in Medieval Spanish Texts

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017, 2019

An examination of how Christians, Jews, and Muslims; their roles; and their interaction are represented in medieval Spanish texts. To understand the complex relationship that existed between members of these three dominant faiths, special attention will be given to the socio-political, legal, and cultural climate of the Iberian Peninsula. Genres examined will include, among others, poetry, historiography, and exemplar prose.

Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

General Courses

Code Course Credits

ANT 105

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology and is designed as an exploration into the diversity of ways in which human beings perceive and order the social world. Topics covered include kinship, gender, language, ecology, economy, political organization, globalization, religion and worldview from a diverse array of cultural viewpoints. Course readings and films include both classic and contemporary ethnographies.

This course was formerly offered as SOC 228 Cultural Anthropology.

3

ANT 233

Language and Culture

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is an overview of linguistic anthropology and sociolinguists, focusing on the relationship between language, culture, and society. Students will explore the nature of human language by studying language in a variety of social contexts with the goal of better understanding how language and culture interact to reflect, maintain, alter, and create the social worlds in which we live.

This course formerly offered as SOC 233 Language and Culture.

3

BUS 336

International Business

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course introduces the students to the economic, political, and cultural environments affecting international business. In addition, the influence of government on trade, foreign direct investment, foreign exchange, export and import strategies, and the impact of multinational enterprises will be discussed. Students will also be exposed to the comprehensive set of dynamics that comprise international business decision environments and will learn to evaluate alternative courses of action in a global setting. Particular emphasis will be placed on areas of current importance. Extensive use of cases and readings.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies programs. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

4

COM 315

Intercultural Communication

Offered: Fall Semester

Examines the role of communication in the creation and transmission of cultural knowledge and practice. Discusses the impact of communication differences in cross cultural contexts.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor & Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

ECO 219

History of World Economic Development

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017 and 2019

The world has experienced an extraordinary but unevenly distributed increase in material living standards over the last 250 years. This course examines major developments, issues, and controversies related to long run economic development and change. Themes include the causes of technological leadership, the connection between technological change and business structure, and the spread of industry.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Asian Studies, Anthropology, and Middle Eastern Studies programs. May also be applied to the Latin American Studies programs with permission of the Program Director.

3

ECO 311

International Economics

Offered: Spring Semester

This course covers the major themes of the theory of international trade. The gains from trade, tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade, the theories of international trade such as the theory of absolute and comparative advantage and the Heckscher-Ohlin theory will be studied. The justifications for trade protection, its effects on the economy, historical and contemporary U.S. trade policy and the economics of regional trade agreements will also be discussed.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies programs. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

ECO 343

International Finance

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Different aspects of the international financial markets, international trade, and balance of payments are studied by using analytical models of an open economy. This course examines the structure and the performance of the foreign exchange market through an extensive use of the Bloomberg technology. Using Bloomberg, students learn the interactions between economic news, global financial markets and exchange rates. Particular emphasis is placed on current issues related to the global financial crisis, international monetary system, the European Union and The European Bank. Other topics include money and financial management for international corporations, interest and commodity arbitrage, spot and forward currency markets. Bloomberg Financial Terminals and Bridge Telerate are used in the course in order to give students a more hands-on knowledge of the international financial markets.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor and Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

HIS 353

A World at War

Offered: Not Offered 2017-2018

Organized violence represents one of the most common of human activities. Warfare shapes, and is shaped by, deep seated political, social, economic, religious, and technological values and attitudes. For good or ill, warfare has played, and continues to play, a key role in shaping the world we live in. The course explores warfare and its consequences from a world historical perspective from Paleolithic times to ancient China and the Middle East to modern day forms of state and extra-state violence.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

POL 143

International Politics

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An exploration of the formation of foreign policy, the structure and processes of international systems, patterns of conflict, economic and security issues, and institutions and processes of conflict resolution.

3

POL 234

Comparing States

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The variations in political systems of states will be explored in terms of state-society relations. Types of democratic and authoritarian systems will be investigated, as well as conditions of their consolidation, change or transformation. In addition, the role of such forces as political protest and participation, ideologies and civil society on shaping politics and policy outcomes will be explored through comparative case studies of countries around the world.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

POL 353

International Law and Organizations

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2014, 2016

Explores the extent to which international organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank are able to alter the contours of statehood and state sovereignty and whether such international organizations serve or dominate state actors. Case studies are Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Iraq.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors.

3

SOC 202

Sociology of Globalization

Offered: Fall Semester

Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect political, economic, and cultural realms. Important topics include: globalization and the state, global politics, the global economy and inequality, and globalization's homogenizing and diversifying effects.

Course may be applied to the Anthropology, Asian Studies, and Middle Eastern Studies minors.

3

Language, Literature & Culture Courses

Students may take up to two foreign language courses (even at the 100-Level), either through directed study with faculty, or by taking transfer courses elsewhere.

Appropriate languages include:

  • Arabic
  • Hebrew
  • Kurdish
  • Persian
  • Turkish

Other languages may be approved by the Program Director.

Note:

Students may petition the Program Director for credit approval for relevant courses not included on these lists.