Earth and Planetary Sciences, B.S. Requirements

Program DirectorAlessandro Massarotti

Office: Shields Science Center 309

Phone: 508-565-1430
amassarotti@stonehill.edu

The major in Earth and Planetary Sciences requires the completion of seventeen courses.

Complete Fifteen Required Courses

Code Course Credits
Taken Freshman Year

CHM 113

General Chemistry I

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The fundamentals of chemistry are covered including: matter and measurement, atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, and an introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibrium.

4

CHM 232

General Chemistry II

Offered: Spring Semester

The course further develops the introductory physical and analytical chemistry initiated in CHM 113, while introducing new topics to complete the coverage of all general chemistry concepts. The topics covered include gases, states of matter, solutions, nuclear chemistry, and an in-depth treatment of kinetics and the equilibria of acid-base, solution, and electrochemical reactions.

4

MTH 125

Calculus I

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Calculus of a single variable: functions, limits, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, integrals, techniques of integration, applications of integration, infinite sequences and series, first and second order differential equations. May not receive credit for both MTH 125 and MTH 119.

4

MTH 126

Calculus II

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Calculus of a single variable: functions, limits, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, integrals, techniques of integration, applications of integration, infinite sequences and series, first and second order differential equations.

4

PHY 121

Physics I

Offered: Fall Semester

Brief introduction to vectors and basic concepts of calculus; kinematics; Newton’s laws, force, work and power; conservative forces, potential energy; momentum, collisions; rotational motion, angular momentum, torque; oscillations, simple harmonic motion; gravitation and planetary motion; fluid dynamics; kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics; heat capacity and transport.

Corequisite(s): MTH 125.

4

PHY 122

Physics II

Offered: Spring Semester

Brief introduction to the basic concepts of vector calculus, such as line and surface integrals, integral version of Gauss’ theorem and Stokes’ theorem; Coulomb’s law, insulators and metals; electrostatic induction, potential energy; capacitance; currents, resistance, basic circuits, batteries; magnetism and currents; Ampere’s law; motion of free charges in magnetic fields, mass spectroscopy; magnetic induction, Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves; geometric and wave optics; light as photons, photoelectric effect.

Corequisite(s): MTH 126.

4
Taken Sophomore Year

ENV 200

Principles of Environmental Science

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Fundamentals of the life sciences and physical sciences as they pertain to our environmental problems and solutions, as well as consideration of the pertinent social sciences such as economics. This interdisciplinary science course teaches relevant basic research techniques, and students will conduct research on real environmental problems.

This course includes field trips/work, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.

3

ENV 295

Physical Geology

Offered: Not Offered 2017-2018

A systems approach to geology and landforms, including ecosystems that develop on the abiotic substrate. Scientific study of the earth's modern and ancient lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

This course includes substantial field work both on and off campus, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.

4

MTH 261

Multivariable Calculus

Offered: Fall Semester

Continuation of the sequence begun in Calculus I and II. Functions of several variables, analytic geometry, vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integration.

4

PHY 221

Physics III

Offered: Fall Semester

Mechanical and electrical examples of damped, forced and resonant oscillations; the mechanical wave equation via Newton’s mechanics; the electromagnetic wave equation via Maxwell’s equations; traveling sound and electromagnetic waves; diffraction and interference, geometrical limit of wave optics.

4
Typically taken Junior or Senior Year

CHM 333

Physical Chemistry I

Offered: Fall Semester

This course provides in-depth exploration of key chemistry topics in thermodynamics and kinetics. Topics include: gas laws, energy transfer, phase equilibrium, chemical potential, properties of solutions, and kinetic theory and mechanism. Specific applications of physical chemistry are given in terms of material science, nanoscience, biochemistry, environmental chemistry, and technology.

4

CHM 250

Global Biogeochemistry: Building a Habitable World

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017, 2019

A study of the earth as a dynamic system governed by the interplay between biological, geological and chemical processes. These processes are what make the planet hospitable for life. This understanding is needed to address the environments issues we face today. Furthermore, these processes have shaped the co-evolution of life and the planet.

Course may be applied to the Environmental Science and Studies Programs.

3

ENV 350

Climate Science

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2018, 2020

An overview of the Earth's climate system, including major physical and chemical components and interactions. Students will acquire the scientific perspective necessary to competently assess issues related to current climate change concerns.

3

ENV 360

Introduction to Oceanography

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017, 2019

This course is designed to be a fundamental introduction to ocean sciences. Students will explore the physical and biological processes that govern the ocean's circulation and marine life. Topics include waves and currents, marine life and ecosystems, tides, beach erosion and the way the ocean is being affected by global climate change.

This course includes substantial field work off campus, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.

3

PHY 326

Geophysics

Offered: Offered Periodically

Students will study creeping flow mantle; physical chemical evidence of plate tectonics; planetary tomography; ridges subduction zones; formation continental crust; plumes hot spot volcanism; seafloor depth versus age, lithosphere in time; model of heat diffusion; pressure, gravity, sound speed composition of lithosphere, mantle and core; viscous flow, stress, strain, strain rate; equations governing fluid flow; viscosity of the mantle; plate tectonics heat flow, Earth heat engine; convection plate motion; and past Earth origins of plate tectonics.

3

Complete Two of the Following Upper-Level Courses

Code Course Credits

CHM 221

Organic Chemistry I

Offered: Spring Semester

The basics of organic chemistry are covered including: structure and bonding of alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons and alkynes; functional groups containing heteroatoms; chromatography; spectroscopy; stereochemistry; methods of studying organic reaction; and an introduction to mechanisms of organic reactions.

4

CHM 334

Physical Chemistry II

Offered: Spring Semester

This course explores quantum chemistry and spectroscopy. The Schrödinger equation is solved for a one-dimensional particle-in-a-box, the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotator, and the hydrogen atom. Approximation methods for many-electron atoms, chemical bonding, group theory, molecular spectroscopy, and lasers are studied as well.

3

ENV 325

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduction to geographical information systems technology, focusing on spatial data acquisition, development and analysis in the science and management of natural resources. Topics covered include basic data structures, data sources, data collection, data quality, geodesy and map projections, spatial and tabular data analysis, digital elevation data and terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, and cartographic layout. Laboratory exercises provide practical experiences that complement the theory covered in lecture.

Course may be applied to the Data Science program.

4

PHY 223

Introduction to Physics Computing

Offered: Offered Periodically

This course teaches how to use software (MATLAB, Mathematica, other) to solve Physics problems. Students learn LaTex, the software used writing research articles. Topics range from the use of derivatives and integrals to complex variables, differential equations, systems of differential equations, partial differential equations and systems, with applications to mechanics, statistical mechanics, wave motion in one and two dimensions and others. We will explore solutions to the wave equations, diffusion equation and Schroedinger's equation.

3

PHY 322

Astrophysics and Cosmology

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduction to the structure of stars and hydrostatic equilibrium; stellar nuclear fusion; stellar evolution, the ultimate fate of stars, stellar super-winds and supernovae; stellar remnants: white dwarfs, neutron stars and degeneracy pressure; x-ray sources; black holes and accretion disks; how relativity predicts the expansion of the universe; quasars and gamma ray bursts; modern cosmology: microwave background radiation; dark matter; vacuum energy; the formation of galaxies from gravitational instability; primordial synthesis of the elements; the Big Bang as a test of our high energy physics theories.

3

PHY 327

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

Offered: Offered Periodically

Fluid dynamics is important in describing stellar, planetary dynamics (mantle, oceans and atmosphere), and multiple engineering applications. The course covers the following: Dissipationless fluids: conservation of mass, Euler's equation, equation of continuity, conservation of energy, entropy, Bernoulli's equation, adiabatic, isothermal fluids, thermal and mechanical equilibrium, vorticity, Helmholtz theorems, irrotational flow; Viscous fluids: viscosity, strain rate, stress, Navier-Stokes equation; waves, instability in fluids, turbulent flow, boundary layer flow, convection; compressible flow, sound waves; aerofoils, Kutta-Joukowski theorem.

3

PHY 328

Planetary Astrophysics

Offered: Offered Periodically

Rocky planets, icy planets, giants; solar nebula and planets' formation by core accretion and planets' migration; present data frequency of planets around stars; dust to planetesimals to planets; comparative analysis of rocky planets in solar system; plate tectonics, stagnant lid describing Mars, Venus and Earth; whole planet heat structure models of planets in solar system; modeling of super-Earths other solar systems; outer moons tides; search for life on planets and moons; habitable zone around stars.

3