Spring 2010 Teaching Roundtable Series

NAVIGATING THE IRB PROCESS

Bonnie Troupe, Erica Tucker, & Tom Gariepy
Friday, February 26, 1:00 - 2:00

Engaging in research with human participants? Have questions about the IRB review process at Stonehill? Three members of the Institutional Review Board -- Bonnie Troupe (Director of Academic Development), Erica Tucker (Anthropology), & Tom Gariepy (Health Care Administration) -- will give an overview of the proposal process, share tips for successful proposals, and answer your questions at this informal roundtable conversation.

PANEL PRESENTATIONS

Bob Goulet
Tuesday, March 16, 2:30 - 3:30

Interested in exploring alternatives to tests and essays for evaluating student learning? Join Bob Goulet (English) for a discussion of how panel presentations can provide students with opportunities to demonstrate what and how (and possibly why) they have learned in the course of the semester. Bob will share examples of how panel presentations have worked in his classes and answer questions about how they could be adapted to other disciplines.

CREATIVE USES OF THE CREDIT MODEL

Roger Denome, Glen Ilacqua, & Allyson Sheckler
Thursday, March 25, 1:00 - 2:00

Stonehill's new credit model promises to expand our opportunities for curricular and pedagogical innovation. For this roundtable, three faculty involved with the establishment of the credit model -- Roger Denome (Biology), Glen Ilacqua (Business Administration), & Allyson Sheckler (Visual & Performing Arts) -- will share their ideas for taking advantage of the flexibility the new model allows. Come brainstorm with colleagues about your own ideas for creative uses of our new credit model.

DIVERSITY IN THE CLASSROOM

Stacy Grooters
Thursday, April 8, 11:30 - 12:30

A repeat of last semester's workshop, this roundtable will focus on strategies for creating more inclusive classroom environments for students from traditionally underrepresented groups. Come discuss strategies, research, and resources related to inclusive pedagogy.

MASTERING THE RECOMMENDATION LETTER

Craig Almeida, Maria Curtin, & George Piggford
Wednesday, April 14, 12:30 - 1:30

Most of us received little to no guidance about writing recommendation letters as graduate students, and yet it is a responsibility that can take up a significant amount of our time as professors. In this roundtable, three faculty with experience writing and reviewing recommendation letters -- Craig Almeida (Dean of Academic Achievement), Maria Curtin (Chemistry), & George Piggford (English) -- will discuss what they think makes for a strong letter and share strategies for making letter writing more manageable.

CONTEMPLATIVE PEDAGOGY

Todd Gernes, Chris Ives, & Greg Shaw
Tuesday, April 20, 4:00-5:00 (NEW DATE AND TIME)
Duffy 135 Conference Room

What do yoga, tai chi, or mindfulness meditation have to do with liberal arts pedagogy? How can a moment of silence enhance critical thinking and reflection? Is there a place for contemplation in our curriculum? Are contemplative practices an effective antidote for our "culture of distraction?"

Contemplative practices are as old as the world's religions and have become a part of mainstream popular culture. Chris Ives (Relgious Studies), Greg Shaw (Religious Studies), and Todd Gernes (Director of Undergraduate Education and the First Year Experience) will host a discussion about the ways in which higher education has embraced contemplative practices. Learn about the emergent field of Completive Studies and how you might get involved.

ENCOURAGING REFLECTION IN COMMUNITY-BASED LEARNING

Ken Branco & Angela Paradise
Wednesday, April 28, 10:00 - 11:00

One of the foundations of community-based learning (and other experiential learning approaches) is the importance of creating space for student reflection about their experiences. Kate Rafey (Coordinator of Community-Based Learning) will facilitate this roundtable discussion with Ken Branco (Sociology) and Angela Paradise (Communication), who will share their approaches to encouraging student reflection, such as journaling, online discussion boards, and student-made videos. Even if you aren't doing community-based learning, come share your strategies for encouraging and teaching critical reflection.