Fall 2009 Teaching Roundtable Series

THE LIMITS OF CLASSROOM TECHNOLOGY

Peter Rapp, Rob Rodgers, & Estelle Wenson
Thursday, October 8, 1:00 - 2:00
Duffy 135 Conference Room

With the growing availability and variety of classroom technologies available to faculty, it can be challenging to make choices about whether a new technology will further learning in a particular class or distract from it. As individual faculty members, how do we make choices about the kinds of technologies we choose to incorporate into our courses? And how do we assess their effectiveness?

For this roundtable, Peter RappRob Rodgers and Estelle Wenson(our new eLearn Faculty Mentor) will share their thoughts about the limits of technology in their own classes. They'll talk about the different kinds of technologies they've used, the benefits they've observed, as well as the limitations. All faculty are welcome!

DESIGNING AN HONORS SEMINAR

George Piggford, John Golden, Sue Mooney, Greg Shaw, & 
Joe Velazquez

Thursday, October 22, 2:30 - 3:30
Duffy 135 Conference Room

Interested in proposing one of your courses as an honors seminar? Wanting to rethink an existing honors seminar that you're offering? Curious how other Stonehill faculty have designed their honors seminars?

Then join George Piggford (Director of the Honors Program) in a conversation with Sue MooneyJohn Golden, and Greg Shaw(former Director of the Honors Program) about their different approaches to designing honors seminars. They'll share their insight and advice, as well as provide feedback to participants on their own seminar ideas.

DIGITAL STORYTELLING: A WORKSHOP

Guest speaker: Pete Burkholder (Fairleigh Dickinson University)
Monday, November 9, 3:00 - 4:30
MacPháidín Library 116 (computer lab)

Multimedia projects now offer a bewildering array of possibilities for the college classroom. But where to begin?

In this workshop, Professor Pete Burkholder (Fairleigh Dickinson University) introduces a straightforward, easy-to-implement but rigorous digital storytelling project that just about anyone can use.

This technique has now been employed successfully in subjects ranging from history to criminal justice to business. Attendees will learn the rudiments of assembling a simple digital story, and receive a step-by-step instruction manual that they can use when assigning digital story projects to their students.

Thanks to Beth Belanger (History) for her help in organizing this workshop!

SUPPORTING UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

George Branigan, Sarah Gracombe, Bonnie Klentz & Louis Liotta 
Tuesday, November 17, 11:30 - 12:30
Duffy 135 Conference Room

For this roundtable, George BraniganSarah GracombeBonnie Klentz, and Louis Liotta will discuss their experiences supporting undergraduates in completing independent research projects. We'll put a special emphasis on working with students on SURE projects, but we'll also have time to talk about supporting other kinds of undergraduate research projects and independent studies.

Please note: Bonnie Troupe will be organizing a separate session, as usual, to talk about the SURE proposal process and tips for writing a successful proposal.

ASKING BETTER QUESTIONS

Scott Cohen
Wednesday, December 2, 2:30 - 3:30
Duffy 114 Conference Room

A good question is often the foundation for a good class discussion, as well as for a good student paper. So for this roundtable, Scott Cohen (English) will lead us in a conversation about teaching students how to ask good, sound, intellectual questions as a way of advancing class discussion - and as a skill to integrate into paper writing. We'll also talk about how we as faculty can model these skills in the questions we raise in class discussion and in paper assignments.