Academic Integrity at Stonehill

The Office of Academic Services & Advising plays an active role in upholding the academic integrity policy and overseeing implementation of academic integrity procedures. 

 

File an academic integrity report

View Academic Integrity procedures

 

Our Goals 

Students and faculty are supported through disputes of academic integrity 

We strive to be a valuable resource for students and faculty as they navigate issues of academic integrity. If a student or faculty member feels the academic integrity policy has been violated, they should address the issue with the student and file an academic integrity report.

Please call our office at 508-565-1306 to speak with Dean Piskadlo or Darcy Lynch for guidance.

Students are aware of resources for proper citation

These can be found in these guides, hosted by the library:

http://libguides.stonehill.edu/WritingCenter
http://libguides.stonehill.edu/citation

Ask your professor, or refer to your course syllabus for more information

All members of the Stonehill community know and adhere to the Academic Honor Code

In the context of a community of scholarship and faith, and anchored in a belief in the inherent dignity of each person, the students, faculty, staff and administration of Stonehill College maintain an uncompromising commitment to academic integrity. We promote a climate of intellectual and ethical integrity and vigorously uphold the fundamental values of honesty, trust, fairness, and responsibility while fostering an atmosphere of mutual respect within and beyond the classroom. Any violation of these basic values threatens the integrity of the educational process, the development of ideas, and the unrestricted exchange of knowledge. Therefore, we will not participate in or tolerate academic dishonesty.

All students know and adhere to the Academic Integrity Policy

Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy include but are not limited to the following actions:

a.  Presenting another's work as it if were one's own; 
b.  
Failing to acknowledge or document a source even if the action is unintended (i.e. plagiarism);
c.  Giving or receiving, or attempting to give or receive, unauthorized assistance or information in an assignment or examination; 
d.  Fabricating data;
e.  Submitting the same assignment in two or more courses without prior permission of the respective instructors;
f.  Having another person write a paper or sit for an examination;
g.  Unauthorized use or electronic devices to complete work; or
h.  Furnishing false information, including lying or fabricating excuses, for incomplete work. 

Food for Thought

Consider the obstacles to academic integrity raised in this very quick, self-guided, Prezi (first, make the presentation full-screen (hit the icon on the bottom, right-hand of the presentation, then navigate through with the arrows at the bottom of the presentation).