Stonehill provides distinct advantages to students pursuing speech-language pathology careers

March 28, 2017


Whether it’s collaborating with fellow graduate students or serving in clinical placements, Jessica Davi ’15 is constantly reminded of how well her Stonehill experience prepared her for the speech-language pathology (SLP) master’s program at Northeastern University in Boston.

 “I find myself always referring back to my Stonehill classes and how they helped me become an independent thinker and a great group participant,” says Jessica, a native of Leominster, Massachusetts. “The emphasis on academic rigor and group collaboration I gained from my Stonehill courses has given me an edge in my graduate classes.”

 Stonehill College recently announced the introduction of a minor in SLP, designed to prepare students for graduate school programs in communication science disorders, speech-language pathology, and audiology.

 Even before the creation of its new speech-language pathology minor, Stonehill has long been committed to students interested in careers in the field.

“The support I received at Stonehill helped me gain admission to top graduate school programs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Northeastern University,” says Lorraine Smith ’17, who was instrumental in helping to launch the new minor program and who next year will be attending UNC’s prestigious master’s program in speech-language pathology.

“I find myself always referring back to my Stonehill classes and how they helped me become an independent thinker and a great group participant. The emphasis on academic rigor and group collaboration I gained from my Stonehill courses has given me an edge in my graduate classes.”
Jessica Davi ’15

Courses, Internships and Mentoring Give Students an Edge

With support from faculty advisors and Stonehill’s Career Development Center, Jessica Davi was able to supplement her academic undergraduate experience with three SLP internships — one in an elementary school, one in a clinic and another in a private practice. Conveniently, all were in Easton and minutes from campus.

 “These internships gave me real-life professional experience, and I am constantly referring to them during classes and off-campus clinical work at Northeastern,” Jessica says. “In particular, my work at Parkview Elementary in Easton has put me in a unique position at the elementary school I am currently working in.”

 Jessica, Lorraine and other Stonehill students pursuing a career in speech-language pathology also benefit from a student group they and other SLP students helped create. The Stonehill Speech-Language Pathology Club provides academic, informational and social support to students looking to study SLP. It also has been certified as a NSSHLA (National Student Speech- Language-Hearing Association) chapter.

 In addition, the growing network of Stonehill alumni in the field has been of benefit. In the fall of 2016, for example, Jessica worked at South Shore Hospital in Weymouth, Massachusetts, where Jamie Blanchard ’10 was her supervisor.

Adds Jessica, “When applying to graduate school, I was constantly asked what sets me apart and I consistently referred to my Stonehill experiences and the edge they have given me.”

Students interested in taking advantage of the new SLP minor can contact Professor Peter Ubertaccio, associate dean of interdisciplinary programs, for more information.