Sociology, B.A. Requirements

Department Chairperson:Department Chairperson:Ann Marie Rocheleau Office: Martin Institute 237 Phone: 508-565-1982arocheleau@stonehill.edu

The Sociology major requires the completion of ten courses.

Complete Five Required Courses

Code Course Credits

SOC 101

Introduction to Sociology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology and an overview of the main theories, basic concepts, and research methods used in the field. Using a social justice lens, the course examines the relationship between individuals and groups and their roles in society, with discussion of topics including culture, social structure and institutions, socialization, social movements and change, social class, race and ethnicity, gender, sexuality, family, crime and criminal justice, and global conflicts.

Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

SOC 210

Survey of Research Methods for Sociology

Offered: Fall Semester

A survey of quantitative and qualitative research methods employed in sociology. Topics include problem selection and definition, the relationship between theory and practice, literature review, research design, ethical issues, sampling, data collection, analysis, interpretation and representation. Research methods considered include surveys, content analysis, interviewing, ethnography, and multi-method research.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

3

SOC 311

Statistical Analysis in Sociology

Offered: Spring Semester

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical methods as applied to research in sociology. Topics include measures of central tendency, dispersion, hypothesis testing using parametric and nonparametric tests, contingency table analysis, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation and regression. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) will be used throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and SOC 210.
Fulfills the Statistical Reasoning requirement.

3

SOC 305

Sociological Theories

Offered: Fall and Spring Semester

Study of the theories of society from Comte, Durkeim, Marx, Weber, and other classical theorists, as well as several major contemporary theories, including feminism.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101, plus one additional SOC course.

3

SOC 312

Qualitative Research (WID)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An in-depth exploration of qualitative research practices in sociology. Students will study theoretical and methodological aspects of qualitative research and engage in hands-on projects utilizing the following methods: oral history interview, or in-depth interview, and ethnography.

Prerequisite(s): (SOC 101 or SOC 110) and SOC 210; OR ANT 105 and one 200 or 300-level Anthropology (ANT) course.
Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement.Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

4

Complete Four Elective Courses

Code Course Credits

CRM 400

Seminar: Writing for Criminology (WID)     (fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course examines central themes and issues in the field of Criminology, with content varying depending on the faculty leading the seminar. All courses will be writing-intensive, considering different genres of disciplinary writing and diverse potential audiences. Students will write in various styles and refine their writing.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional Criminology (CRM) course.
Course may be taken twice as long as the topics differ.Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines and the Seminars in Criminology requirements.

3

CRM 409

Seminar: Deviance and Control

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Examines the concept of deviance in society and its implications for the study of contemporary behavior. The first half of the semester focuses on the competing perspectives on deviant behavior and implications. The second half examines how individual and organizational deviance is defined, reacted to, and managed.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 410

Seminar: Juvenile Justice

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines promising strategies, primarily in the private sector, for handling juvenile offenders. Students directly observe programs and work with program managers to develop plans to expand community-based and private-sector support. Presentation, advocacy, and networking skills are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 224 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 411

Seminar: Police and Society

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Police discretion and values. Affirmative action, hiring, training, police organization, police and the community. Research and evaluation in criminology.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 412

Seminar: Punishment and Public Policy

Offered: Spring Semester

Seminar will focus on the development of punishment policy, judicial discretion, and the sanctioning process. It will trace the history of punishment in the US; compare our policies with those of other countries; and examine the impact of punitive society. Students will study death penalty policy, considering its morality, implementation, and impact.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 430

Seminar: Race, Class and Gender in the Criminal Justice System

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A comparative examination of women and minorities in the criminal justice system. Topics include: women and minority offenders; women and minority victims; women and minorities at different stages of the criminal justice process (police, courts, and corrections); women and minorities employed within the system; and societal attitudes toward women and minorities involved in the system.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

CRM 432

Seminar: At-Risk Families and Youths

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines characteristics of the growing numbers of families and youths on the "fault line" of present-day society in the United States. Causes and solutions that have been proposed to understand, control, and redress problems of at-risk families and youths are discussed. Topics include social stratification, victimization, crime prevention, innovative school programs, and other social intervention programs.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 224 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 440

Seminar: White Collar Crime

Offered: Fall Semester

The course focuses on crimes committed by persons of respectability and high social status as opposed to traditional “street crimes” normally spotlighted in criminal justice courses. Such crimes include: restraint of trade, misrepresentation in advertising, infringement of patents and copyrights, unfair labor practices, financial fraud, and violations of trust. The extent, societal costs, and enforcement practices of such crimes are evaluated. Implications for prevention and for the punishment of offenders are presented for class discussion. The case method is used as the basis of class structure.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 455

Seminar: Terrorism

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2016, 2018

This course examines the context for terrorism, with the aim of understanding what terrorism is, its manifestations, and root causes. Starting with the historical origins of the concept of 'terror', the course covers state terror, domestic terrorism, the internationalization of terrorism, discussing various terrorist groups in the United States and around the world. The class culminates in an analysis of counter-terrorism and due process in the United States.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

SOC 405

Seminar on Public Sociologies

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Public sociology-sociological research that emerges from dialogues with publics-is both one of the oldest and newest topics within the discipline. This course will examine how sociologists can connect with publics, explore methodologies and concepts, study global public sociologies, and identify ways to promote public sociology.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional Sociology course.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 407

Seminar: Social Movements

Offered: Fall Semester

Social movements allow the voice of the powerless to be heard. This course will analyze the evolution of social movements. It will examine barriers to success and conditions that support movements. By looking at historical and contemporary movements, students will be able to understand important concepts in the study of social revolution.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional SOC course.

3

SOC 413

Seminar: Sociology of Education

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines the contributions of sociological theories and research to our understanding go the structure and function of educational systems in contemporary society. Current educational policies, programs and reforms will be reviewed and critically analyzed. Research will include neighborhood and community level data as well as state, national and international comparisons.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

3

SOC 415

Seminar: American Inequality

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This seminar is designed to build on knowledge gained from previous courses and learning opportunities. The focus is to read critically and understand how race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, nationality and other forms of difference are reflected in our social relationships and institutions. Exploring this topic from multiple perspectives we will study the victims, the perpetrators and the activists seeking to challenge both individual and institutional inequality and social injustice.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional SOC course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

SOC 416

Seminar: Love, Intimacy and Human Sexuality

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Students will apply a socio-historical approach to examine how sexual meanings are derived and sexual activity/desire is organized. Treating homosexuality and heterosexuality as social categories, the course will look at how categories are structured, and will 'denaturalize' these categories and analyze the different institutional settings in which sexuality is constructed.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and at least one additional course.
Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

SOC 421

Seminar: Oppression

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This seminar takes a critical look at the rights of the individual within the family, community, state and nation. Beginning with The Universal Declaration of Human Rights we investigate the violation of human rights globally and in America. Texts include examples of the denial of human rights...to victims of sex trafficking, to those who suffer from mental illness, to children and youth at risk, to immigrants seeking shelter, safety and opportunities in America.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional SOC course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies, Anthropology and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

SOC 425

Seminar: Critical Issues in Contemporary Society

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Systematic analysis of major contemporary social problems with focus on their sources, patterns, consequences, and current efforts at intervention and amelioration.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional Sociology course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ANT 105

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology and is designed as an exploration into the diversity of ways in which human beings perceive and order the social world. Topics covered include kinship, gender, language, ecology, economy, political organization, globalization, religion and worldview from a diverse array of cultural viewpoints. Course readings and films include both classic and contemporary ethnographies.

This course was formerly offered as SOC 228 Cultural Anthropology.Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

ANT 110

Families in Cross-Cultural Perspective (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall Semester

This course examines concepts of marriage and family as social institutions from a cross-cultural perspective. Drawing on both classic and contemporary essays as well as in-depth ethnographic studies of families, we will examine the ways in which intimate relationships are created, understood, and enacted around the globe.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
This course was formerly numbered SOC 230 and is the equivalent to ANT 230 - Families in Cross-Cultural Perspective Fulfills the First-Year Seminar Requirement and may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

4

ANT 200

Foundations of Archeology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Archaeology is the study of the human past through the remains of their material culture. Archaeologists study artifacts, sites, settlements, and landscapes to gain an understanding of how humans lived in the distant and recent past. Students will gain an understanding of the principles, methods, and theories of archaeological research, while exploring the history of the field and case studies.

This course was formerly offered as SOC 115 Introduction to Archeology.Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

ANT 230

Families in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course examines concepts of marriage and family as social institutions from a cross-cultural perspective. Drawing on both classic and contemporary essays as well as in-depth ethnographic studies of families, we will examine the ways in which intimate relationships are created, understood, and enacted around the globe.

This course was formerly SOC 230 Families in Cross-Cultural Perspectives.Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

ANT 233

Language and Culture

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is an overview of linguistic anthropology and sociolinguists, focusing on the relationship between language, culture, and society. Students will explore the nature of human language by studying language in a variety of social contexts with the goal of better understanding how language and culture interact to reflect, maintain, alter, and create the social worlds in which we live.

This course formerly offered as SOC 233 Language and Culture. Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

ANT 304

Museum Studies

Offered: Fall Semester

A survey of museology, this course introduces students to the history of museums and debates about their role in society. Students will visit and read case studies of ethnographic, history, and art museums among others to explore the relationships between exhibits, museum missions, those they represent, and the communities in which they reside.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 or ANT 105.
This course was formerly offered as SOC 304 Introduction to Museum Studies.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ANT 316

People & Cultures of Russia & East Europe

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Students will explore the culture of contemporary Russia and East Europe from an anthropological perspective using ethnographic research to explore how the socialist past continues to shape contemporary society in the region.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 105 or SOC 101.
This course was formerly offered as SOC 316 People & Cultures of Russia & East Europe.

3

ANT 329

Anthropology of Violence

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

War, political and economic oppression, sectarian strife, poverty and disease are pervasive in the world today, ravaging the lives of ever-growing numbers of people. Using a cross-cultural approach, we will explore the impact of violence on society, its cultural legacies, and examples of building peace.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 or ANT 105.
This course was formerly offered as SOC 329 Anthropology of Violence.

3

ANT 334

Anthropology of the Holocaust

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

In recent decades social scientists have increasingly turned their attention to the Holocaust. The goal of this class is to examine these studies in order to better understand the events, their causes, and their legacies from a range of perspectives: victims, perpetrators, witnesses, and rescuers.

3

CRM 204

Sociology of the Prison

Offered: Spring Semester

Particular stress is placed on basic structure of American prisons - their purposes and their effects. Focal questions include: Who goes to prison? What happens to those imprisoned? What happens to those released from prison? Prison policy development and implementation with regards to current criminological theory and research and current public opinion are discussed as a central concluding theme.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 224

Juvenile Delinquency

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An examination of juvenile delinquency in American society. Topics included are the historical background and "invention" of delinquency, cross-cultural definitions of delinquency, theories of delinquency, social class differences, and the juvenile court system. The course critically examines the social, health, and mental health services which have been utilized by this society in attempts to prevent or "treat" delinquent behavior.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

CRM 273

Crime and Mental Illness

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

The course examines crime and mental illness, including social-psychological theories of crime; co-occurring psychological disorders; problem-solving courts (drug treatment, mental health, and re-entry) comprising the emerging field of "therapeutic jurisprudence"; and mentally ill offenders in prison and community settings. Sociological issues of gender, class and race will be discussed wherever relevant.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201.

3

CRM 295

Topics in Criminology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semester

Examines topics of current interest in criminology, including the etiology and characteristics of specific categories of crime. The specific content focuses on timely, cutting edge research and case studies that are of academic importance. Content varies as topics evolve.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ.

3

CRM 353

Ethics, Values, and Diversity in Criminal Justice

Offered: Fall and Spring Semester

It has been said that criminal justice is an infant discipline compared to most. Perhaps, according to the author of ethics in criminal justice, Sam Souryal, this explains why we tend to be more concerned about crime rather than justice, and process rather than philosophy. This course will examine the roles of ethics, value and diversity in all areas of our criminal justice system today. We will explore the major issues involved in establishing, implementing, and maintaining the highest standards of excellence, values and ethical behavior for professionals in our field. We will identify the major challenges the system is facing as it deals with an increasingly diverse society, exploring such issues as profiling, hate crimes, women in criminal justice, etc. We will identify the elements involved in making ethical decisions as provided by some of the earlier philosophers e.g. Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, etc. Leading to the principle of "Summum Bonum." We will utilize this process in reasoning through numerous ethical scenarios we face daily in our criminal justice system. Finally, we will discuss the importance of leadership during these critical times, building the ideal environment, understanding diversity and temperament, and managing the various power bases that left unchecked may negatively impact our goals relative to ethic, values and diversity.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Course fulfills the Moral Inquiry Requirement.

3

CRM 355

Global Crime

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2016, 2018

This course provides a foundation for understanding causation, victimization, and control problems of various forms of transnational and international crimes. To understand the context for these crimes the course begins with an introduction to globalization and its effects on society, people, and crime. The second part of the course examines the nature and manifestations of various forms of global crimes ranging from genocide to human trafficking, organized crime, and corporate deviance.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Asian Studies minors.Students registered for this course are eligible to apply for the Learning Inside Out (LION) international internship and professional development program. Please contact Professor Anamika Twyman-Ghoshal for details.

3

SOC 202

Sociology of Globalization

Offered: Fall Semester

Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect political, economic, and cultural realms. Important topics include: globalization and the state, global politics, the global economy and inequality, and globalization's homogenizing and diversifying effects.

Course may be applied to the Anthropology, Asian Studies, and Middle Eastern Studies minors.

3

SOC 205

Sociology of Marriage and Family

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines families today and in the past with a view to understanding the changes that have taken place in gender roles, sexuality and reproduction, courtship, co-habitation and marriage, parenthood and child-rearing. We will look at the institution of the family within a political, social and economic framework. We will also examine some of the challenges facing families today; poverty, teen pregnancy, adoption and foster care, surrogacy, child abuse and neglect and domestic violence.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.
Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

SOC 211

Sociology of Religion

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Discussion of basic theories and methods used by sociologists to understand religious phenomena. Consideration of the special problems of religious groups in various cultural settings.

3

SOC 212

A Great Society?

Offered: Spring Semester

This class explores society's social and political debate over what role society should have in social welfare, examines the principles of President Johnson's Great Society, and seeks an understanding of those forces that create and perpetuate social class problems. Issues include: poverty, child abuse, and mental illness.

Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

SOC 216

Native Americans in the 21st Century

Offered: Spring Semester

This course analyzes the interactions between Native Americans and non-Natives. It looks critically at meanings of tribal sovereignty and the changing dynamics of international relations. Federal and state policies related to land, constitutional governments, crime and law enforcement, tribal recognition, sacred cultural artifacts, and economic development are assessed.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program and Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 218

Images and Power: Popular Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines American popular culture as a site of cultural politics and explores representations of race, gender, sexuality and "success" that permeate our cultural space. Through a critical interrogation of a variety of pop culture forms, students will consider how norms and values are challenged, resisted, transformed and created through pop culture.

Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

SOC 220

Political Sociology

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This class is a sociological review and analysis of political structure and power. The course will critically analyze: state structures, political parties, power, legitimacy, civil society, and the welfare state.

Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 222

Environmental Sociology

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

What does it mean to adopt a constructionist approach to "nature" and the environment? By looking at local, national, and global issues, this course will consider the social structural and cultural sources of environmental degradation, the emergence of environmental movements, and the intersection of justice and environmental issues.

Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

SOC 223

Use and Abuse of Alcohol

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

The use and abuse of alcohol in different cultures and ethnic groups is examined. Analysis of symptoms, causes, new legislation and treatment modalities concerning alcohol abuse. Special emphasis on the disease concept of alcohol and modern drinking habits.

3

SOC 227

Human Services

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduction to human service organization and methods. Methods, such as individual, group, and family counseling, community organization, social planning, and human service research, are considered. Organization of services into programs to address problems of child abuse, the elderly, mental illness, alcoholism, drug abuse, and crime, among others.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

3

SOC 232

Crises, Conflict, and Control

Offered: Fall Semester

Examination of the history of social thought around three themes: (1) crises of the world, (2) conflict between groups within a society and conflict between societies, and (3) social control mechanisms ranging from global military intervention to the subtle manipulation of opinion within a society.

Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

SOC 234

Racial and Ethnic Diversity

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course is an introduction to the study of race and ethnicity in America. Beginning with the social construction of race we explore how the categorization of individuals and groups has changed and continue to create and limit opportunities and rights. Drawing from critical race theory and research from scholars and activists across disciplines this course also looks at the intersectionality of race and ethnicity with other categories of difference.

Course may be applied to the American Studies and Anthropology programs.

3

SOC 236

Sociology of Urban Space

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines sociological theories and approaches to understanding urban, suburban, and exurban spaces. Case studies will consider how social class, culture, politics, industrialization, immigration, economics, and geography contribute to social identities of cities.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

SOC 237

Sociology of Gender

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Course will distinguish between sex and gender and critically examine how social historical meanings about femininity and masculinity are socially constructed, reinforced, and challenged. Considers how gender differences and gender inequality play out in a variety of institutions including education, the economy, the family, politics, religion, the media and medicine. Critical perspectives, including feminist and multi-cultural approaches, will be employed.

Course may be applied to the American Studies, Anthropology and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

SOC 290

Drug Abuse and Addiction

Offered: Fall Semester

The course will start with an examination of the prevalence of drug abuse and the types of drugs used in our society. However, the majority of the course will focus on the current opioid epidemic, including the use of heroin. We will compare the current opioid epidemic with prior heroin epidemics in terms of both use and reaction by criminal justice and health professionals. Special attention will be given to legislation regarding illicit drugs and prevention/intervention strategies. An historical review of Americans' attitudes and practices regarding illicit drugs will be included.

3

SOC 295

Topics in Sociology

Offered: Spring Semester

Examines a topic of current interest in the public sphere, such as urban homelessness, from a sociological perspective. The content and format of the course will be tailored to the topic area. Seminars in Sociology

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ.

3

SOC 328

Community Organizing: People, Power & Change

Offered: Spring Semester

Covers theoretical frameworks and practical skills necessary to identify, recruit, and develop leadership, build community around that leadership, and build power from that community. The reflective practice of the course is structured around work in an organizing project (e.g. youth, community, electoral, union, or issue) designed to achieve a real outcome by semester's end.

Corequisite(s): SOC 101 (may be taken concurrently).
Course may be applied to the American Studies and the Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

Complete a Capstone in Sociology

Code Course Credits

SOC 470

Capstone Internship in Sociology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The Capstone course for the major, the Internship provides an academic experience in which the third- or fourth-year student (only) contributes to the ongoing organizational process while learning to apply sociological theories to observations of structure, function, and process in a particular social service agency or institution.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 210 and SOC 311.
Must complete the "U.S. Internship Request for Approval" process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship. Capstone course may not be taken twice.This course fulfills the Capstone requirement.

3

Notes

1. 100-level courses, beyond SOC 101, do not count toward the major. 2. Students may not double major in Sociology and Criminology.