Courses

Code Course Credits

CRM 110

From CSI to Lockup: Myths and Realities (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Offered Periodically

An introduction to the major institutions of criminal justice from a social scientific perspective. Examines the structure and operation of police, courts, and corrections. Theories and concepts of criminology and other disciplines will be used to describe the workings of the criminal justice system and to raise questions for critical analysis.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
Fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Social Scientific Inquiry Requirement.

4

CRM 120

Critical Introduction to Criminal Justice

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An introduction to the major institutions of criminal justice from a social scientific perspective. Examines the structure and operation of police, courts, and corrections. Theories and concepts of sociology and other disciplines will be used to describe the workings of the criminal justice system and raise questions for critical analysis.

Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

CRM 201

Criminology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course provides a broad overview of sociological and interdisciplinary theories of criminal behavior and social control. Students learn how to analyze theories and research on crime for the purpose of advancing theory as well as developing policies for crime prevention and control. Not open to first-year students in their first semester.

3

CRM 204

Sociology of the Prison

Offered: Fall Semester

Particular stress is placed on basic structure of American prisons – their purposes and their effects. Focal questions include: Who goes to prison? What happens to those imprisoned? What happens to those released from prison? Prison policy development and implementation with regards to current criminological theory and research and current public opinion are discussed as a central concluding theme.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 208

Sex Offenders: Patterns and Behaviors

Offered: Fall Semesters

This course examines theories and research on sexual assault and sex offenders, evaluates the effectiveness of assessment and treatment practices, and explores supervision/legal strategies designed to prevent recidivism of sex offenders.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201

3

CRM 224

Juvenile Delinquency

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An examination of juvenile delinquency in American society. Topics included are the historical background and "invention" of delinquency, cross-cultural definitions of delinquency, theories of delinquency, social class differences, and the juvenile court system. The course critically examines the social, health, and mental health services which have been utilized by this society in attempts to prevent or "treat" delinquent behavior.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 and CRM 201.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

CRM 273

Crime and Mental Illness

Offered: Offered Periodically

The course examines crime and mental illness, including social-psychological theories of crime; co-occurring psychological disorders; problem-solving courts (drug treatment, mental health, and re-entry) comprising the emerging field of “therapeutic jurisprudence”; and mentally ill offenders in prison and community settings. Sociological issues of gender, class and race will be discussed wherever relevant.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201.

3

CRM 303

Procedural Criminal Law

Offered: Fall Semester

Due process of law; arrest; search and seizure; electronic surveillance; entrapment, right to counsel; privilege against self-incrimination; plea bargaining; double jeopardy.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
This course is the equivalent of CRM 333 - The Accused.

3

CRM 304

Victims in the Courtroom

Offered: Fall Semester

Involves the study of crime victims and their experiences with the Criminal Justice System. Will focus on the dynamics of intimate partner violence and its history as a social problem. A substantial portion of the course will focus on the mechanics of the courtroom as they relate to crime victims.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 305

Substantive Criminal Law

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Principles of criminal liability, defenses to crime, the insanity defense, crimes against property, crimes against the habituation, crimes against the person, and the justification for punishment.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 307

Mechanics of the Courtroom

Offered: Spring Semester

Preparation of witnesses; examination of legal techniques of discrediting and impeachment of witnesses; scope of direct and cross-examination; rules of evidence; burden of proof and burden of persuasion; ethical responsibilities of prosecution and defense; division of responsibility between judge and jury.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201. (CRM 305 is recommended).

3

CRM 310

Research Methods for Criminology

Offered: Fall Semester

An introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods employed for conducting research in criminology. Topics include: problem selection and definition; relationship between theory and research; measuring crime; sampling; data collection and analysis; understanding the “Action Research” model; developing goals, objectives, and performance measures; creating a research design; and program evaluation methods. Research designs considered include surveys, content and secondary data analysis, interviewing, field observation, and experiments.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 311

Statistical Analysis in Criminology

Offered: Spring Semester

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to the field of criminology. Topics include: measures of distribution, frequency, cross-tabulation, and analysis of variance and correlation. The course will also cover creating variable lists, data coding, creating databases for criminal justice agencies, analyzing the data using a variety of software packages, and presenting the data in narrative and graphic formats. Students will learn how to use Microsoft ACCESS to create databases, the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences to analyze data, and Microsoft PowerPoint for statistical presentations.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Fulfills the Statistical Reasoning requirement.

3

CRM 314

Practicum: Victims in the Courtroom

Offered: Spring Semester

A select group of students will have the opportunity to go to court on a weekly basis. Under the supervision of the instructor, the students will assist victims of crimes through the judicial process. Duties will include: restraining order applications; preparation of victim impact statements; and appearing before the judge.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 304 and permission of instructor.

3

CRM 318

Federal Criminal Process

Offered: Fall Semester

This course examines federal authority and responsibility for criminal acts, including constitutional issues, federal statutes (RICO, money laundering, tax offenses, domestic terrorism, public corruption), federal enforcement agencies, criminal procedure, federal grand jury, and Federal Sentencing Guidelines. Unique tools available to federal law enforcement agencies and prosecutors – asset forfeiture, electronic interception, the Patriot Act – will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 322

Violent Crime and Federal Initiatives

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course examines current patterns of violent crime in the US, such as gang violence and spousal abuse, and the role of federal criminal justice agencies in designing and implementing agency partnership models to reduce crime in local communities.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

CRM 324

Alternative Resolutions in Criminal Justice

Offered: Offered Periodically

Mediation is an effective method of reducing or resolving conflict between disputing parties. Its use is widespread: in government (courts, international diplomacy); as a professional service for businesses and families; in schools; and in community crime prevention where gangs are prevalent. Techniques of mediation are learned through reading, demonstration, and role-play.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 333

The Accused

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course contemplates the criminal justice system (primarily in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts) from the perspective of the defendant and his counsel and from arrest to post-trial in misdemeanor and felony court. Beginning with the attorney-client relationship and continuing throughout criminal proceedings, defendants and defense counsel face challenges distinct from law enforcement and prosecutors. The course examines the unique challenges that the accused, whether guilty or not, encounter in the modern criminal justice system.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
This course is the equivalent of CRM 303 - Procedural Criminal Law.

3

CRM 335

Spatial Crime Analysis

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduces a variety of methods and techniques for the visualization, exploration, and modeling of crime data using geographic mapping. Emphasis on mapping real life crime data and exploring mapping technology as a strategic planning tool for law enforcement agencies. The main objectives are to teach students the basic concepts of geographic mapping and its use by a variety of criminal justice agencies using ArcView Mapping software.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 352

Topics in Criminology

Offered: Fall Semester

Examines topics of current interest in criminology, including the etiology and characteristics of specific categories of crime. The specific content focuses on timely, cutting edge research and case studies that are of academic importance. Content varies as topics evolve.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.

3

CRM 353

Ethics, Values, and Diversity in Criminal Justice

Offered: Fall Semester

It has been said that criminal justice is an infant discipline compared to most. Perhaps, according to the author of ethics in criminal justice, Sam Souryal, this explains why we tend to be more concerned about crime rather than justice, and process rather than philosophy. This course will examine the roles of ethics, value and diversity in all areas of our criminal justice system today. We will explore the major issues involved in establishing, implementing, and maintaining the highest standards of excellence, values and ethical behavior for professionals in our field. We will identify the major challenges the system is facing as it deals with an increasingly diverse society, exploring such issues as profiling, hate crimes, women in criminal justice, etc. We will identify the elements involved in making ethical decisions as provided by some of the earlier philosophers e.g. Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, etc. Leading to the principle of "Summum Bonum." We will utilize this process in reasoning through numerous ethical scenarios we face daily in our criminal justice system. Finally, we will discuss the importance of leadership during these critical times, building the ideal environment, understanding diversity and temperament, and managing the various power bases that left unchecked may negatively impact our goals relative to ethic, values and diversity.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Course fulfills the Moral Inquiry Requirement.

3

CRM 355

Globalization and Transnational Crime

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2014, 2016

The course begins with an introduction to the dimensions of globalization and its effects on society, people, and crime. Thereafter, the nature and manifestations of transnational crimes will be examined, including money laundering, corruption, corporate deviance, trafficking, smuggling, and piracy. The course looks at understanding causation, victimization, and control problems faced in the global age, as nations become increasingly interdependent.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

CRM 400

Seminar: Writing for Criminology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course examines central themes and issues in the field of Criminology, with content varying depending on the faculty leading the seminar. All courses will be writing-intensive, considering different genres of disciplinary writing and diverse potential audiences. Students will write in various styles and refine their writing.

Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines and the Seminars in Criminology requirements.

3

CRM 409

Seminar: Deviance and Control

Offered: Offered Periodically

Examines the concept of deviance in society and its implications for the study of contemporary behavior. The first half of the semester focuses on the competing perspectives on deviant behavior and implications. The second half examines how individual and organizational deviance is defined, reacted to, and managed.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 410

Seminar: Juvenile Justice

Offered: Offered Periodically

This course examines promising strategies, primarily in the private sector, for handling juvenile offenders. Students directly observe programs and work with program managers to develop plans to expand community-based and private-sector support. Presentation, advocacy, and networking skills are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 224 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 411

Seminar: Police and Society

Offered: Spring Semester

Police discretion and values. Affirmative action, hiring, training, police organization, police and the community. Research and evaluation in criminology.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 412

Seminar: Punishment and Public Policy

Offered: Fall Semester

Seminar will focus on the development of punishment policy, judicial discretion, and the sanctioning process. It will trace the history of punishment in the US; compare our policies with those of other countries; and examine the impact of punitive society. Students will study death penalty policy, considering its morality, implementation, and impact.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 430

Seminar: Race, Class and Gender in the Criminal Justice System

Offered: Offered Periodically

A comparative examination of women and minorities in the criminal justice system. Topics include: women and minority offenders; women and minority victims; women and minorities at different stages of the criminal justice process (police, courts, and corrections); women and minorities employed within the system; and societal attitudes toward women and minorities involved in the system.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

CRM 432

Seminar: At-Risk Families and Youths

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course examines characteristics of the growing numbers of families and youths on the "fault line" of present-day society in the United States. Causes and solutions that have been proposed to understand, control, and redress problems of at-risk families and youths are discussed. Topics include social stratification, victimization, crime prevention, innovative school programs, and other social intervention programs.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 224 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 440

Seminar: White Collar Crime

Offered: Fall Semester

The course focuses on crimes committed by persons of respectability and high social status as opposed to traditional “street crimes” normally spotlighted in criminal justice courses. Such crimes include: restraint of trade, misrepresentation in advertising, infringement of patents and copyrights, unfair labor practices, financial fraud, and violations of trust. The extent, societal costs, and enforcement practices of such crimes are evaluated. Implications for prevention and for the punishment of offenders are presented for class discussion. The case method is used as the basis of class structure.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.

3

CRM 470

Capstone Internship in Criminology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The Capstone course for the major, the Internship provides an academic experience in which the third- or fourth-year student (only) contribute to the ongoing organizational process while learning to apply criminology theories to observations of structure, function, and process in a particular correctional, court, or law enforcement agency.

Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior Criminology majors who have completed CRM 201 and at least one other Criminology course.
Must complete the "U.S. Internship Request for Approval" process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship. May not take the Capstone twice.

3

CRM 475

Internship in Criminology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Gain experience and/or research skills in local, state, or federal criminal justice agencies.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 470.
Must complete the "U.S. Internship Request for Approval" process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship.

3

CRM 490

Directed Study

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Supervised reading and research directed by Department member. Permission of the faculty member directing the project and the Department Chairperson.

3

CRM 497

Senior Thesis

Offered: Offered Periodically

Fourth-year students will polish their communication skills and build on prior coursework. The goal is preparation of a paper suitable for presentation at an annual meeting of a professional association during the spring semester. Taught in seminar/workshop format, the course includes presentations from departmental faculty about conducting research in sociology, criminology and anthropology.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chairperson.

3