Philosophy

All of us have a desire to understand life. But for Philosophy majors, it’s a passion.

Stonehill’s Philosophy Department is committed to nurturing and cultivating passion in students who have a keen interest in developing their own understanding of being human and of existence. It’s a journey that unfolds in small classes where students and professors often develop friendships that continue long after their time in class together.

In addition to providing them with a solid foundation in the history and central principles of philosophy, the major is designed to provide students with the flexibility to delve into the philosophical questions and issues that intrigue them the most. All philosophy course help students better understand their world in one way or another. Examples include:

  • Ethics and the Arts
  • Bio-medical Ethics
  • Philosophy of Architecture
  • Political Philosophy

A Foundation that Enhances Any Career

Students who major in philosophy are able to pursue jobs in a wide variety of fields because they possess a skill that employers covet: the ability to think critically. It’s what philosophers do better than anyone else. The attention given by philosophers to clarity and rigor of thought is unparalleled among the academic disciplines. Our students have gone on to successful careers in:

  • Law
  • Journalism
  • Education
  • Social service
  • Business

According to payscale.com, those with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy have higher starting salaries than all other liberal arts majors. In addition, a study conducted by the National Institute of Education found that philosophy majors consistently scored higher than nearly all other majors on both the GRE and the LSAT. It also found that philosophy majors tend to score 15% higher than business majors on the GMAT.

Value that Cannot be Measured on a Balance Sheet

In a world that increasingly attempts to commoditize higher education, philosophy reminds us of the value of learning as an end unto itself. By giving students the tools to examine themselves and their world, philosophy, perhaps more than any other discipline, offers enrichment in ways that cannot be measured on a balance sheet.

“Philosophy students are more likely to challenge the status quo, and that’s a good thing in all kinds of jobs.
It’s not just about following the rules and being obedient to the prevailing way of doing things, but questioning these norms in a constructive and productive way.”
Richard Capobianco, Professor of Philosophy