Environmental Science, B.S./Environmental Engineering, B.S. Dual Degree Requirements

Program Director:Susan Mooney Office: Shields Science Center 104 Phone: 508-565-1171smooney@stonehill.edu

Stonehill College offers an Engineering Program in collaboration with The University of Notre Dame. Students in this 3+2 Engineering Program with the University of Notre Dame receive a B.S. in Environmental Science from Stonehill College and a B.S. in Environmental Engineering from the University of Notre Dame.

Students in this program typically complete the following courses:

Complete Twenty-two Required Natural Science & Mathematics Courses

Code Course Credits

BIO 101

Biological Principles I

Offered: Fall Semester

An introduction to the concepts of molecular biology, the cell, energetics and genetics.

Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

4

BIO 102

Biological Principles II

Offered: Spring Semester

An introduction to the principles of evolution, biodiversity, and ecology.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101.
Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

4

BIO 307

Ecology

Offered: Spring Semester

Structure and dynamics of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Mathematical models.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 102, (BIO 101 or ENV 200) Junior or Senior standing.
This course fulfills the Environmental/Ecological requirement.

4

BIO 309

Microbiology

Offered: Spring Semester

A survey of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria. Topics include: microbial cell biology, growth, metabolism, and genetics; control of microbial growth; host-microbe interactions; and environmental microbiology.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 211 and Junior and Senior standing.
This course fulfills either the Molecular/Cellular or Organismal requirement.

4

BIO 419

Wetlands: Ecology, Hydrology, Restoration

Offered: Fall Semester

Role of wetlands in hydrology and landscape ecology. Functions of marshes, swamps and bogs in water and nutrient cycles and in biodiversity. Links between wetlands and human activities (agriculture, coastal development, fisheries). Legal framework for protection/restoration of wetlands.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites: One year introductory science (biology, chemistry or physics); two semesters of upper-level science.
Marine Studies Consortium course. Students should apply through Prof. Burkholder.

3

CHM 113

General Chemistry I

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The fundamentals of chemistry are covered including: matter and measurement, atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, and an introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibrium.

Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

4

CHM 221

Organic Chemistry I

Offered: Spring Semester

The basics of organic chemistry are covered including: structure and bonding of alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons and alkynes; functional groups containing heteroatoms; chromatography; spectroscopy; stereochemistry; methods of studying organic reaction; and an introduction to mechanisms of organic reactions.

Prerequisite(s): CHM 113 (with a grade of C- or better - starts with the Class of 2019).

4

CSC 103

Computer Science I

Offered: Fall Semester

An introduction to programming and problem solving using Java. Topics include: Input and Output; Selection; Repetition; Methods; Recursion; Arrays; Classes and Objects.

Course may be applied to the Data Science program.

4

CSC 104

Computer Science II

Offered: Spring Semester

Inheritance; Polymorphism; Exceptions; Stream IO; Elementary Data Structures; Graphics; Event Driven Programming.

Prerequisite(s): CSC 103.
Course may be applied to the Data Science program.

4

ENV 200

Principles of Environmental Science

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Fundamentals of the life sciences and physical sciences as they pertain to our environmental problems and solutions, as well as consideration of the pertinent social sciences such as economics. This interdisciplinary science course teaches relevant basic research techniques, and students will conduct research on real environmental problems.

This course includes field trips/work, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

ENV 201

Research Methods in Environmental Science (WID)

Offered: Fall Semester

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop and practice the research skills required of today's environmental scientists. Working in the lab and field, students will learn to safely identify, collect, analyze and report on key variables from a variety of environmental systems including rivers, forests and wetlands.

Prerequisite(s): ENV 200 (may be taken concurrently)
This course includes field trips/work, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement.

1

ENV 295

Physical Geology

Offered: Fall Semester

A systems approach to geology and landforms, including ecosystems that develop on the abiotic substrate. Scientific study of the earth's modern and ancient lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: ENV 200
This course includes substantial field work both on and off campus, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.

4

ENV 325

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduction to geographical information systems technology, focusing on spatial data acquisition, development and analysis in the science and management of natural resources. Topics covered include basic data structures, data sources, data collection, data quality, geodesy and map projections, spatial and tabular data analysis, digital elevation data and terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, and cartographic layout. Laboratory exercises provide practical experiences that complement the theory covered in lecture.

Prerequisite(s): ENV 200.
Course may be applied to the Data Science program.

4

ENV 350

Climate Science

Offered: Spring Semester

An overview of the Earth's climate system, including major physical and chemical components and interactions. Students will acquire the scientific perspective necessary to competently assess issues related to current climate change concerns.

Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing and one course in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics.

3

MTH 125

Calculus I

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Calculus of a single variable: functions, limits, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, integrals, techniques of integration, applications of integration, infinite sequences and series, first and second order differential equations. May not receive credit for both MTH 125 and MTH 119.

4

MTH 126

Calculus II

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Calculus of a single variable: functions, limits, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, integrals, techniques of integration, applications of integration, infinite sequences and series, first and second order differential equations.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite for MTH 126: MTH 125.

4

MTH 225

Statistics for Science

Offered: Spring Semester

Probability; descriptive statistics; normal distribution, inference; hypothesis testing; analysis of variance; sampling theory; correlation and regression. Examples from the sciences.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 125.
Fulfills the Statistical Reasoning requirement. Course may be applied to the Data Science program.

3

MTH 251

Linear Algebra

Offered: Spring Semester

The development of the methods and underlying ideas for solving systems of linear equations. Topics include: vectors, matrices, linear transformations, determinants and eigenvectors. Use of mathematical software MAPLE, in applications.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 261.

4

MTH 261

Multivariable Calculus

Offered: Fall Semester

Continuation of the sequence begun in Calculus I and II. Functions of several variables, analytic geometry, vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integration.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 126.

4

PHY 121

Physics I

Offered: Fall Semester

Brief introduction to vectors and basic concepts of calculus; kinematics; Newton’s laws, force, work and power; conservative forces, potential energy; momentum, collisions; rotational motion, angular momentum, torque; oscillations, simple harmonic motion; gravitation and planetary motion; fluid dynamics; kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics; heat capacity and transport.

Corequisite(s): MTH 125.

4

PHY 122

Physics II

Offered: Spring Semester

Brief introduction to the basic concepts of vector calculus, such as line and surface integrals, integral version of Gauss’ theorem and Stokes’ theorem; Coulomb’s law, insulators and metals; electrostatic induction, potential energy; capacitance; currents, resistance, basic circuits, batteries; magnetism and currents; Ampere’s law; motion of free charges in magnetic fields, mass spectroscopy; magnetic induction, Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves; geometric and wave optics; light as photons, photoelectric effect.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 125
Corequisite(s): MTH 126.

4

PHY 420

Engineering Statics

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Introduces students to the basic principles of engineering statics. The course deals with forces acting on rigid bodies under static equilibrium. Topics include forces, force systems, moments, couples, first and second moments of areas and volumes, inertia, centroids, frames and trusses.

Prerequisite(s): PHY 121

3

Complete One Humanities Course

Code Course Credits

PHL 230

Environmental Ethics

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

For description see ENV 270 .

Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.

3

Complete One Social Science Course

Code Course Credits

ECO 327

Environmental Economics

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Topics in natural resource and energy economics and environmental regulation, include the allocation, development, conservation, and scarcity of natural resources. We study pollution control through taxes, quotas and standards using cost-benefit models as a policy guide. Types of energy resources, substitutability, conversion and the relevance of energy to economic growth is discussed.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 or the First-Year Seminar equivalent.

3

ENV 275

Environmental Law

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores rationales for environmental protection; the choice of policy instruments to address environmental problems; and the roles played by governmental and non-governmental actors. Practical experience with issues of environmental law will be gained through a partnership with the Natural Resources Trust of Easton.

Prerequisite(s): ENV 200 or POL 123.

3

ENV 301

Water Resource Management

Offered: Fall Semester

Offered through the Massachusetts Bay Marine Studies Consortium. Interdisciplinary examination of water, our most precious natural resource. A look at water from scientific, historical, and cultural viewpoints. Survey of contemporary water problems in all dimensions: political, economic, and technological.

Students may not take both ENV 301 and ENV 302 - Coastal Zone Management.

3

POL 255

Environmental Policy and Politics

Offered: Spring Semester

Global climate change, mass extinctions, polluted waterways, hazardous waste dumps, oil spills, and nuclear meltdowns. Concerns about the health and integrity of the environment have garnered much attention since the 1960s. This course examines the nature and extent of public policy-making that addresses these and other environmental issues.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 383

Environmental Justice

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2017, 2019

This course explores how the environment relates to social justice. How are environmental challenges in the United States as well as internationally connected to deep structural injustices related to class, race and gender? We will read moral philosophy and political theory as well as social scientific and historical research. Then we will apply the theories to a few cases of environmental injustice: hazardous waste disposal, food justice, climate change, and inter-generational justice.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Philosophy course, or POL 110 or POL 171.
Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the Environmental Science and Studies programs.

3

SOC 222

Environmental Sociology

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

What does it mean to adopt a constructionist approach to "nature" and the environment? By looking at local, national, and global issues, this course will consider the social structural and cultural sources of environmental degradation, the emergence of environmental movements, and the intersection of justice and environmental issues.

Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

SOC 328

Community Organizing: People, Power & Change

Offered: Spring Semester

Covers theoretical frameworks and practical skills necessary to identify, recruit, and develop leadership, build community around that leadership, and build power from that community. The reflective practice of the course is structured around work in an organizing project (e.g. youth, community, electoral, union, or issue) designed to achieve a real outcome by semester's end.

Corequisite(s): SOC 101 (may be taken concurrently).
Course may be applied to the American Studies and the Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

General Education Requirements

In addition to the courses above, students must also fulfill the Cornerstone requirements of Stonehill College. Natural and Social Scientific Inquiry as well as Statistical Reasoning, Moral Inquiry and the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirements are met within the major. the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement can be satisfied at Notre Dame.

Course work taken in the first year at The University of Notre Dame fulfill the senior capstone requirement of the Stonehill major.

Complete One Environmental Themed Learning Community

Environmental Themed Learning Community offerings vary from year to year. Check yearly course offerings online.

Code Course Credits

LC 318

Learning Community: The Ethics and Science of Climate Change: Global Problems and Local Solutions

Offered: Year-Long Learning Community

In this LC students will think critically about the potential social and environmental impacts of climate change in our region. In the spring LC course, students will work with local community partners to assess risks and opportunities, working to develop climate action plans tailored to that organization.

Corequisite(s): Students must also take ENV 200 and ENV 270 as part of this Learning Community.

3

LC 319

Learning Community: The Story of Stonehill's Water

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Stonehill College uses over 27 million gallons of water per year - and that doesn't include the sprinklers. This learning community will explore where that water comes from and where it goes after being "used" by the college. More broadly, this course will examine the health of the Taunton River watershed.

Corequisite(s): Students must also take ENV 200 and POL 255 as part of this Learning Community.

3

LC 336

Learning Community: The Origin of Resources: From Farm to Studio

Offered: Fall Semester

This seminar combines a dual interest in sustainable food systems, an in depth understanding of the basis, production, and use of historical studio materials, and how they share a symbiotic relationship. There will be a focus on homemade and sustainable ingredients that reflect the local and global Slow Food movement and important issues of fair trade, organic production, and humane methods of consumption will be discussed.

Throughout the semester, students will participate in creating historical artist materials from start to finish, which will include harvesting plant materials from the farm to make pigments and inks, tools, making hand-made paper, utilizing animal by-products, and cooking with the same ingredients. With this in mind, we hope to reflect a "nose to tail" mindset to honor the origins of our resources.

Corequisite(s): Students must also take ENV 326 - Sustainable Agriculture and VPS 207: Making Art Materials as part of this Learning Community.
The week-long travel component will be held at an agriturismo whose mission aligns with our course goals (negotiations underway) in Italy and include visits to Italian Slow Food Presidias, which support the protection of biodiversity, territories and knowledge of traditional productions. Visits to small-scale producers may include farmers, fishers, butchers, shepherds, cheesemakers, bakers and pastry chefs. A studio workshop will be held at the agristurismo featuring indigenous materials and how they relate to the history of art in Italy. Day visits to nearby Siena and Florence will also allow students to see how the studio materials they have worked with all semester are made evident in the masterworks from Art History.Travel will occur during the January winter session period (dependent on scheduling airfare, etc.). An additional fee will be charged to student's tuition bill.

1