Neuroscience, B.S. Requirements

Program Director:John McCoy Office: Shields Science Center 215 Phone: 508-565-1347jmccoy1@stonehill.edu

The Neuroscience major at Stonehill provides a strong education in the fundamentals of neuroscience at the same time that it allows students to emphasize either the psychological or the biological aspects of the field. Students who have focused on the psychological aspects are prepared for graduate work in psychology and careers in clinical psychology, counseling, and behavioral research. Students with a focus on the biological side of neuroscience are prepared for a variety of careers in medicine, pharmacology, biomedical research, and the allied health fields.

The major in Neuroscience requires the completion of Seventeen Courses.

Complete Thirteen Core Courses

Code Course Credits

BCH 343

Biochemistry I

Offered: Fall Semester

Structure and dynamics of amino acids, peptides and proteins. Enzyme mechanisms and kinetics. Function and mechanisms of coenzymes, survey of carbohydrates, lipids, biological membranes and nucleic acids. An introduction to the bioenergetics and mechanisms of metabolism.

Corequisite(s): CHM 222.

3

BIO 101

Biological Principles I

Offered: Fall Semester

An introduction to the concepts of molecular biology, the cell, energetics and genetics.

Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

4

BIO 102

Biological Principles II

Offered: Spring Semester

An introduction to the principles of evolution, biodiversity, and ecology.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101.
Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

4

BIO 211

Cell Biology (WID)

Offered: Fall Semester

An overview of eukaryotic cell structure and function. Topics include: mechanisms of protein processing, vesicular transport, intercellular and intracellular communication; cell cycle regulation; cell proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death. (CORE)

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 and BIO 102 (with a grade of C- or above - starting with the Class of 2019).
Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement for Biology and Neuroscience majors.

4

CHM 113

General Chemistry I

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The fundamentals of chemistry are covered including: matter and measurement, atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, and an introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibrium.

Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

4

CHM 221

Organic Chemistry I

Offered: Spring Semester

The basics of organic chemistry are covered including: structure and bonding of alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons and alkynes; functional groups containing heteroatoms; chromatography; spectroscopy; stereochemistry; methods of studying organic reaction; and an introduction to mechanisms of organic reactions.

Prerequisite(s): CHM 113 (with a grade of C- or better - starts with the Class of 2019).

4

CHM 222

Organic Chemistry II

Offered: Fall Semester

The mechanistic and synthetic organic chemistry relating to nucleophilic substitution, elimination, additions to carbon-carbon multiple bonds, aromatic substitution, addition and substitution at carbonyls, substitution alpha to carbonyls, rearrangements, and polymerizations. The organic chemistry of natural compounds (e.g. peptides, carbohydrates, etc.) is introduced.

Prerequisite(s): CHM 221 (with a grade of C- or better - starts with the Class of 2019).

4

MTH 125

Calculus I

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Calculus of a single variable: functions, limits, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, integrals, techniques of integration, applications of integration, infinite sequences and series, first and second order differential equations. May not receive credit for both MTH 125 and MTH 119.

4

NEU 271

Research Methods in Neuroscience

Offered: Spring Semester

How do we design scientific experiments that provide sound and convincing evidence of a relationship or effect? What variables and statistical analyses are most relevant in neuroscience experimentation? We will examine neuroscience research methodologies and use case studies and examples drawing from molecular, physiological and behavioral neuroscience, to broaden our perspective of experimental design, data collection and interpretation.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, CHM 113, PSY 101, and PSY 261.

4

PSY 101

General Psychology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Principles underlying physiological psychology, learning, perception, altered states of consciousness, human development, human memory and emotion, personality, social behavior, intelligence, and the behavior disorders.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite for all other courses in the Department except PSY 261 and PSY 204.
Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

PSY 261

Introduction to Statistics

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Examines statistical techniques as used in the behavioral sciences. Topics include: descriptive statistics - measures of central tendency and variability; inferential statistics - principles of hypothesis testing, z test, t test, simple ANOVA, correlation and introduction to regression, and chi square. Statistical analysis software complements use of computational formulae.

Prerequisite(s): Only open to Psychology, Neuroscience, and Interdisciplinary Health Science majors.
Fulfills the Statistical Reasoning requirement.

3

PSY 415

Brain and Behavior

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Structure and function of nerve cells and the nervous system. Research methods in biopsychology, effects of brain damage, physiological principles underlying sleep, eating, abnormal behavior, drug effects, and memory.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

3

Complete One Course from each Cluster below

Code Course Credits

BIO 312

Vertebrate Physiology

Offered: Spring Semester

Principles governing the function of excitable and contractile tissues, respiration, circulation, kidney function, and osmoregulation in vertebrates with emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 and BIO 102.
This course fulfills the Organismal requirement.

4

BIO 324

Endocrinology

Offered: Spring Semester

The endocrine system plays an integrative and regulatory role in the organism. Therefore, endocrinology can be discussed in relation to complex biology and behavior. The role of hormones in a variety of topics, including reproductive biology, stress, and diabetes will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, BIO 102 and BIO 211.
This course fulfills the Molecular/Cellular requirement.Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

4

BIO 406

Seminar in Behavioral Ecology

Offered: Fall Semester

Behavioral ecology is the study of animal behavior from evolutionary perspectives. Historical, developmental, immediate, and ultimate determinants of animal behavior will all be explored. Topics: foraging, habitat selection, anti-predator behavior, migration, communication, learning, competition, aggression, deception, affiliation, courtship, mating, parental care, domestication and "zombie" behavior. Assignments include an animal behavior grant proposal and a mock grant panel.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 and BIO 102. Recommended: BIO 212 and/or BIO 323.
This course fulfills the Organismal requirement.This course may be approved to fulfill the Biology Capstone with approval of the faculty member supervising the Capstone project and the Department Chair before the first day of classes.

3

BIO 409

Immunology

Offered: Fall Semester

Explores the cellular and dissolved components and complex mechanisms that protect humans and other animals from disease. Four hours of lecture per week includes review and in-depth investigation and discussion of immune-related disease in humans.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, BIO 102 and BIO 211.
This course fulfills the Molecular/Cellular requirement.This course may be approved to fulfill the Biology Capstone with approval of the faculty member supervising the Capstone project and the Department Chair before the first day of classes.

4

BIO 212

Genetics

Offered: Spring Semester

Classical genetics of eukaryotes, the biochemistry of gene function, regulation of gene expression, mutation and repair, and genetics of prokaryotes and viruses. Laboratory work stresses classical and molecular genetics research techniques. (CORE)

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, BIO 102 and BIO 211

4

BIO 310

Developmental Biology

Offered: Fall Semester

This course will provide students with an understanding of the fundamental concepts of animal and plant development. The course will investigate and integrate the genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of development, organismal diversity in development, and the evolution of developmental processes. Topics will include genetics and gene expression, cell communication, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, axis specification, organogenesis, neural development, sex determination, morphogens, patterning, and stem cells.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 and BIO 212
This course fulfills either the Molecular/Cellular or Organismal requirement.

4

BIO 323

Evolution

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Mechanisms of evolutionary change. Classical and molecular approaches to evolutionary analysis will be introduced and primary literature will be used to illustrate current examples. Problem-based learning will be used in the laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, BIO 102, and Junior or Senior standing.

4

NEU 400

Psychopharmacology

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Explores mechanisms of drug action, the ways in which the body metabolizes drugs (pharmacokinetics) and the resulting effect a drug has when ingested (pharmacodynamics). By drawing examples from clinical pharmacology, neurology and narcotic abuse we will gain a broad and balanced perspective of the current topics in psychotropic drug use and abuse.

Prerequisite(s): CHM 113 and CHM 221.

3

PHL 252

Minds, Brains and Technology

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A discussion of questions that lie at the intersection of psychology, neuroscience and philosophy, including: How are psychological states like pain related to brain states? Could a digital computer have beliefs? feel pain? fall in love? What can brain-based psychological disorders teach us about the mind? Will advances in neuroscience show that we are not free? or morally responsible?

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Philosophy course.
Course may be applied to the Neuroscience program.

3

PSY 305

Theories of Learning

Offered: Fall Semester

Surveys the functionalistic, associationistic and cognitive schools of learning - applying constructs such as limits, incentives, practice, insight, transfer, and memory to education, child rearing, and adjustment therapy.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

3

PSY 413

Experimental Psychology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Laboratory course in human and animal learning. Each student is expected to explore operant shaping, extinction rates, multiple scheduling, chaining, discrimination, and temporal factors in learning.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 and permission of Instructor.

3

PSY 419

Cognitive Psychology

Offered: Fall Semester

Examination of the principles of cognition. Among the topics discussed are perception, attention, working memory, long-term memory, imagery, language, problem solving, reasoning, and judgment and decision-making. Includes a laboratory component which gives students hands-on experience with cognitive phenomena discussed in class.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

3

PSY 201

Developmental Psychology I

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Study of child development from conception through preadolescence. It emphasizes an understanding of developmental research methods and theories and examines the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, personality and moral aspects of development.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

3

PSY 203

Developmental Psychology II

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Study of human development from early adulthood to death. It emphasizes an understanding of developmental research methods and theories and examines the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, personality and moral aspects of development. (PSY 201 is not a prerequisite for this course).

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

3

PSY 207

Abnormal Psychology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Course employs the DSM-V system of classifying and describing emotional dysfunctioning. It explores the etiology, course, and treatment of major disorders. Dynamics and treatment modalities are approached from the psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and existential models. Examination of research and case studies, and a possible practicum experience.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

3

PSY 209

Social Psychology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Problems, concepts, and methods in the study of social behavior; including conformity, attitude development and change, interpersonal attraction, group processes, and social cognition.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

3

PSY 351

Child Psychopathology and Its Treatment

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Description of psychological disorders which present themselves in infancy and childhood (birth - 12 year olds). Exploration of specific treatment approaches used to date. Discussion of the impact of childhood psychopathology on the family, school system, neighborhood, and nation.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 and PSY 201.

3

Complete a Capstone in Neuroscience

Code Course Credits

NEU 412

Neuroscience

Offered: Fall Semester

The nervous system is our liaison with the world. Tissues, organs, and molecules of the nervous system are identified. Brain anatomy, the action potential, neurons and neurotransmitters are discussed. Brain mechanisms underlying learning and memory, reproduction and addiction are examined. Conditions including stroke, multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 - BIO 102, BIO 211, BIO 312 or PSY 415.
Fulfills the Functional Organismic requirement for Biology majors.Fulfills the Capstone requirement for Neuroscience and may be approved to fulfill the Biology Capstone with approval of the faculty member supervising the Capstone project and the Department Chair before the first day of classes.

4

Additional Suggested Courses

  1. Students who major in Neuroscience usually enroll in one of the following two Learning Communities in the Sophomore year: a. LC 282 - Learning Community: Neuroscience: Mind, Body, Community (which is taken with PSY 415 and NEU 200), OR b. LC 209 - Learning Community: Organic Chemistry of the Cell (which is taken with BIO 211 and CHM 222).
  2. It is strongly recommended that all Neuroscience majors take two semesters of English.
  3. Students who plan to apply to either medical school or a graduate program with a heavy biology focus should also take the following recommended courses:
Code Course Credits

CHM 232

General Chemistry II

Offered: Spring Semester

The course further develops the introductory physical and analytical chemistry initiated in CHM 113, while introducing new topics in order to complete the coverage of all general chemistry concepts. The topics covered include gases, states of matter, solutions, nuclear chemistry, and an in-depth treatment of kinetics and the equilibria of acid-base, solution, and electrochemical reactions.

Prerequisite(s): CHM 113 (with a grade of C- or better - starts with the Class of 2019) and Sophomore standing or permission of both the Engineering Program Director and the Chemistry Department Chairperson.

4

MTH 126

Calculus II

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Calculus of a single variable: functions, limits, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, integrals, techniques of integration, applications of integration, infinite sequences and series, first and second order differential equations.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite for MTH 126: MTH 125.

4

PHY 121

Physics I

Offered: Fall Semester

Brief introduction to vectors and basic concepts of calculus; kinematics; Newton’s laws, force, work and power; conservative forces, potential energy; momentum, collisions; rotational motion, angular momentum, torque; oscillations, simple harmonic motion; gravitation and planetary motion; fluid dynamics; kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics; heat capacity and transport.

Corequisite(s): MTH 125.

4

PHY 122

Physics II

Offered: Spring Semester

Brief introduction to the basic concepts of vector calculus, such as line and surface integrals, integral version of Gauss’ theorem and Stokes’ theorem; Coulomb’s law, insulators and metals; electrostatic induction, potential energy; capacitance; currents, resistance, basic circuits, batteries; magnetism and currents; Ampere’s law; motion of free charges in magnetic fields, mass spectroscopy; magnetic induction, Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves; geometric and wave optics; light as photons, photoelectric effect.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 125
Corequisite(s): MTH 126.

4