History Minor Requirements

Department Chairperson:Kevin Spicer, C.S.C. Office: Duffy Academic Center 252 Phone: 508-565-1090kspicer@stonehill.edu

The minor in history requires the completion of seven courses.

Complete Two European History Courses at the 200-Level or Above

Code Course Credits

HIS 207

The Holocaust

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course will offer an historical analysis of the Holocaust of European Jews under National Socialism. This includes a study of the origins of antisemitism, the rise of National Socialism, German Jews in the Weimar Republic and their exclusion from public life under National Socialism, the euthanasia action, Reichskristallnacht, ghettoization, deportation, and the concentration and death camps.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a European History. Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.

3

HIS 214

Ireland: From Colony to Nation State

Offered: Fall Semester

An introduction to Ireland: its history, people, culture, and mystique. This course explores Irish history from the Norman invasion to the present. Topics include the Cromwellian settlement of Ireland, the Anglo-Irish estate system, revolution and nationalism in Ireland from 1780, the Great Famine, and Irish emigration.

Considered a European History.Course may be applied to the Irish Studies minor.

3

HIS 220

Comparative Empires: Spain and Portugal

Offered: Spring Semester

Investigation of the historical foundations and development of the Iberian Empires of Spain and Portugal, the first global maritime empires of the modern era, and evaluation of their historical significance; Columbus and the age of exploration and conquest; and the maturation and decline of the Iberian Empires.

Considered a European and World History. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program.

3

HIS 221

Ancient Mediterranean Greece and Rome

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A study of the ancient civilizations that coalesced into Hellenistic Culture with a focus on the political, institutional, and intellectual movements, which provided the context for the development of European Civilization.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a European History.

3

HIS 225

History and Film

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

For years, Hollywood has offered an array of films, both epic and provincial, that center upon events in history. Using primary and secondary written accounts, this course will view a comparative selection of these films in the search for "historical" truth.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States and European History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 227

Renaissance and Revolutions: Early Modern Europe

Offered: Spring Semester

This course examines the major developments of a pivotal time in European history known as the Early Modern Era (1400-1800). These developments include the educational reforms of the Renaissance, the religious change and violence of the Reformation, the rise of centralized monarchies, European expansion overseas, the Enlightenment, and democratic revolutions.

Considered a European History.Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.

3

HIS 229

Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This history of women, men and gender in early modern Europe, between the Renaissance and the early nineteenth century. The course will consider philosophical, medical and religious beliefs about women and men, and the real and imagined roles that women played in early modern society: queens, scientists, healers, witches and saints.

Considered a European History.Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

HIS 241

A History of Horror Films

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of the history of horror films. This course is an excursion that will compare and contrast the fictional world of the macabre with the historical realities that form and challenge our social and cultural lives. With the aid of film, this course will analyze the phenomenon of the horror genre down through the ages.

Considered United States and European History.

3

HIS 245

Modern France

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of the rise of modern France from the 1789 Revolution to France's role in the search for European Union. This includes a study of the reign of Napoleon, the Franco- Prussian War, the German Occupation and the Vichy regime, and De Gaulle and the Fifth Republic. The course will place special emphasis on the lives of French men and women.

Considered a European History.

3

HIS 247

Modern Germany

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A history of Modern Germany from the 1871 unification under Chancellor Otto von Bismark through the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification in 1990. The course material will consider such topics as German colonization, the World Wars, National Socialism, and Communism.

Considered a European History.

3

HIS 262

Medieval Europe, 400-1500

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Rise of Medieval Europe through the "barbarization" and Christianization of the Roman Order. Idea of Empire and Christendom, the conflict of Papacy and Kingship. Feudalization of Europe and the rise of cities, popular religious movements. The culmination and crisis of this order in Renaissance cities and its fragmentation in the political and religious conflicts of the Reformation Era.

Considered a European History.

3

HIS 326

The Christian Churches in Nazi Germany

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of the choices that the Catholic and Protestant churches made under the impact of National Socialism. The course will also examine the reaction of the churches to the persecution of the Jews and the Holocaust.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
Considered a European History.Fulfills the Moral Inquiry and Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirements.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 347

Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany

Offered: Spring Semester

An in-depth study of the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi movement from the establishment of the Weimar Republic through the end of World War II.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a European History.Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.

3

HIS 349

The Inquisition: Myth and History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Explores the myths and history of the Inquisition as a social, political and religious institution in Europe, the Americas, and in Goa, India, from its Medieval inception to its final abolition in the nineteenth century. Students will seek to understand why it was created, how it functioned, the impact it had on the societies that sustained it, and why it was finally abolished.

Considered a European and World History.Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

HIS 351

The French Revolution

Offered: Fall Semester

This course focuses on the decade of political upheaval in France (1789-1799) that later became a catalyst for widespread political changes in countries all around the world. In addition to the key events of the Revolution, students explore how ordinary people (including women and people of color) experienced this tumultuous event.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing.
Considered a European History.

3

HIS 360

European History Seminar: Topical

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Offers an opportunity to study a specific area or problem in European history in greater depth. Seminar format focusing on discussion of primary sources and secondary literature. Alternating topics to be announced prior to registration.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a European History.Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor

3

HIS 371

The Age of Absolutism

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines the political, social, and cultural conditions surrounding the development of strong, centralized monarchies of continental Europe and constitutional monarchy of England. Using film, art and primary sources students explore the daily lives of both kings and their subjects during this fascinating era.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a European History.

3

REL 318

Archaeology and Religion in Ancient Greece

Offered: Spring Semester

This course introduces the field of archeology in the Greek world and demonstrate how archaeological remains can enlighten our understanding of Greek religion and society. The course will then examine how material evidence can help us to better understand this complex ancient culture and the world in which it developed.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Religious Studies Cornerstone Course.
Considered a European History course.Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

Complete Two United States History Courses at the 200-Level or Above

Code Course Credits

HIS 205

Irish-American Experience

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Irish background, different waves of Irish immigration, Irish contributions to politics, religion, business and fine arts, as well as the different interpretations of the Irish experience in America.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and the Irish Studies minor.

3

HIS 209

Native American History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An interdisciplinary survey of the aboriginal inhabitants of North America from pre-history to the present. Confronts long-standing stereotypes of Native Americans and seeks a deeper understanding of native beliefs, values, and historical experiences. Course deals extensively with European and Native American encounters and evaluates their continuing impact on indigenous communities.

Considered a United States or World History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and the Anthropology minor.

3

HIS 225

History and Film

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

For years, Hollywood has offered an array of films, both epic and provincial, that center upon events in history. Using primary and secondary written accounts, this course will view a comparative selection of these films in the search for "historical" truth.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States and European History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 228

History of U.S. Foreign Relations

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

In this survey of American foreign relations from the late eighteenth century to the recent past, we will explore significant trends and changes to explain the movement of the United States from a fledgling nation, to regional power, to global empire, and, finally, to declining superpower.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 233

American Catholic Social History

Offered: Fall Semester

An historical presentation of the numerous social issues, conflicts, and varied solutions in American Catholicism from the late 19th century forward with emphasis on how the many issues of society impacted Catholicism. The course demonstrates how the application of faith and various theological and philosophical theories were used in resolution of social conflict.

Considered a United States History. Fulfills the Moral Inquiry and Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 241

A History of Horror Films

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of the history of horror films. This course is an excursion that will compare and contrast the fictional world of the macabre with the historical realities that form and challenge our social and cultural lives. With the aid of film, this course will analyze the phenomenon of the horror genre down through the ages.

Considered United States and European History.

3

HIS 251

United States Economic History

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall Semester 2016, 2018

For description, see ECO 206.

Not open to first semester students. Considered a United States History.

3

HIS 263

Religion in America

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of a variety of religious ideas, institutions, and traditions in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis is placed upon questions of religious pluralism, religion and cultural identity, and religion in public life.

Considered a United States History.Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions Requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 281

American Nation I (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Comprehensive study of American historical development with a focus on the development of U.S. political principles, ideals, founding documents, institutions, and processes. Topics include modes of colonial life, geographical perspectives, the Revolution and Constitution, urban development, westward movement, constructions of race and gender, popular culture, the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Considered a United States History.Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 282

American Nation II (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Spring Semester

An analysis and interpretation of the development of American politics, foreign policy, and domestic society from Reconstruction to the present. Topics include the gilded society, world power, the rise of consumer culture, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, affluence and discontent.

Considered a United States History. Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and the Asian Studies minor.

3

HIS 285

Women in Early America: 1630-1865 (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

The history of women from the colonial era through the end of the nineteenth century. Examines the diversity of experiences among women of different races and classes in America, focusing on issues central to female experience: reproduction and family life, work, religion and reform, and political struggles for civil rights.

Considered a United States History.Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

HIS 286

Asian American History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Survey of Asian migration to and experiences in the United States from mid-nineteenth century to the present. Follows East, Southeast and Asian migrants through gold mines and sugar plantations, on the first transcontinental railroad and on agricultural frontiers, through struggles over citizenship and identity politics. Themes include immigration, race relations and multiculturalism in modern United States history.

Considered a United States and World History.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and American Studies programs.

3

HIS 287

Women in Modern America: 1865-1975

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Survey course of U.S. Women's History from Reconstruction to 1975. Examines a diverse array of women's lives and experiences including women's rights activists, African-Americans, Native Americans and Immigrants. Topics will include civil rights, women in war, education, reform, marriage, family and reproduction, labor, consumer and popular culture.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

HIS 301

Colonial America

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines the social consequences of colonization, migration and war in early America, 1500-1775. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of regional cultures, and the interaction of British colonies with competing European cultures (French, Spanish, Dutch), with Native Americans, and with African-American slaves.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 303

From Depression to Dominance

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course studies the political, social, and economic life of the United States from the Great Depression to 1960. Students will explore the New Deal, World War II, the origins of the Cold War, the growth of new media, and major changes in class, gender, and race relations.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 304

U.S. Popular Culture

Offered: Fall Semester

An investigation of U.S. popular culture focusing on its ability to illuminate important themes in the nation's social, economic, and political development. A special emphasis will be given to twentieth-century popular culture. Important questions and themes will include popular culture's role in perpetuating attitudes regarding race and gender.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

HIS 305

U.S. Popular Music

Offered: Spring Semester

In a seminar format, this course will analyze how American popular music reflected and shaped public notions about class, gender, and race. Topics will include jazz, rap, rock and roll, rhythm and blues, country, and folk music.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

HIS 307

From the New Frontier to a New Century

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course studies the political, social, and economic life of the United States from 1960 to the present. Students will explore the burst of political activism during the 1960s and 1970s, Watergate, the Reagan era, and other historically significant individuals, events, and programs of the last decades of the twentieth century and the early decades of the twenty first century.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 308

The Early Republic

Offered: Spring Semester

Explores the tumultuous years following the American Revolution when Americans fought over the meaning of the war and the future direction of the country. We will examine the major conflicts of the period, including ratification of the Constitution, slavery, reform movements, Indian removal, immigration and capitalist development.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 321

African-American History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores African-American history and culture from the beginnings of slavery in America to the Civil War. Themes include ethnic origins in West Africa, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the emergence of plantations societies in the Americas, slave resistance, the abolition movement, gender, Civil War and emancipation.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 324

From Jackson to Lincoln

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Examination of the major political, social, and economic developments in U.S. Society from the election of Andrew Jackson to the presidency in 1828, to that of Abraham Lincoln in 1860.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 325

Lincoln and His America

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of the life and times of Abraham Lincoln, one of the most important and frequently studied figures in U.S. history. The course is conducted as a seminar, and readings include Lincoln's own speeches and writings as well as scholarly studies of his life and career.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 327

American Civil War and Reconstruction

Offered: Fall Semester

Examines the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction in U.S. history (1860 - 1880), including the war's origins and consequences. The course explores, in addition to the military aspects of the war, the major political, social, and economic development of the period.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 328

Revolutionary America

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course traces the events and conditions that led North American colonists to pursue life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness through political conflict, revolution, and war. We will examine the breakup of empire in North America and consider how ordinary men and women, African-Americans, and Native Americans responded to and shaped revolutionary events.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 329

The Vietnam Era and Its Legacy

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of U.S. policy toward Southeast Asia and the war in Vietnam from the 1940s to the present. The course explores the origins of the U.S. military commitment in Southeast Asia and the ultimate failure of U.S. policy. The effects of the war on veterans and the home front, the peace movement, and the legacy of the war for contemporary U.S. society is also examined.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Asian Studies programs.

3

HIS 330

United States Seminar: Topical

Offered: Offered Periodically

Offers an opportunity to study a specific area or problem in U.S. history in greater depth. Seminar format focusing on discussion of primary sources and secondary literature. Alternating topics to be announced prior to registration.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and may also apply to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program if topic is gender & sexuality related.

3

HIS 332

America in the Nuclear Age

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores the origins and evolution of the nuclear age, both at home and abroad, looking at politics, diplomacy, as well as cultural and social trends. Students will also examine the continuing presence of nuclear weapons as cultural symbols and threats to world peace despite the end of the Cold War.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 333

The American Catholic Experience

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical examination and analysis of the peoples, events, and ideas that shaped American Catholicism from the era of discovery to the 21st century. Catholicism's minority status and the perennial tension being American and Catholic are used as guiding principles in this study.

Considered a United States History.Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.

3

HIS 335

Abolitionist and Proslavery Thought

Offered: Spring Semester

An examination of writing and speeches attacking and defending slavery in the United States between the American Revolution and the Civil War.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 337

The Electric Guitar in American Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores the electric guitar as instrument, symbol, and artifact in modern American culture. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, we will assess the impact of the electric guitar on various kinds of music, from blues to heavy metal, and dig into the lives of the musicians and manufacturers who gave the electric guitar its iconic power.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.Course formerly offered as AMS 333.

3

HIS 380

Public History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This academic and experiential course looks at the practice, methods, and possibilities associated with practicing history in museums, historic sites, and archives. In the classroom, we will explore the nature of public history through curatorial, archival, and preservation issues, as well as examine the roles of education, interpretation, exhibitions, and living history. A substantial field component has students encountering museums, archives, and historic sites to interact with professionals, discover what public historians do, and critically assess their public history offerings. As a final project, students will collaboratively produce a museum exhibition at Stonehill.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 385

Topics in U.S. Women's History

Offered: Fall Semester

This course moves beyond a broad overview of the role of women in eighteenth and nineteenth century U.S. History to examine specific topics such as education, reform, labor, culture, and political organization in depth.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

Complete Two World History Courses at the 200-Level or Above

Code Course Credits

HIS 209

Native American History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An interdisciplinary survey of the aboriginal inhabitants of North America from pre-history to the present. Confronts long-standing stereotypes of Native Americans and seeks a deeper understanding of native beliefs, values, and historical experiences. Course deals extensively with European and Native American encounters and evaluates their continuing impact on indigenous communities.

Considered a United States or World History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and the Anthropology minor.

3

HIS 219

History of World Economic Development

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2016 and 2018

For description, see ECO 219.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Asian Studies, Anthropology, and Middle Eastern Studies programs. May also be applied to the Latin American Studies programs with permission of the Program Director.

3

HIS 220

Comparative Empires: Spain and Portugal

Offered: Spring Semester

Investigation of the historical foundations and development of the Iberian Empires of Spain and Portugal, the first global maritime empires of the modern era, and evaluation of their historical significance; Columbus and the age of exploration and conquest; and the maturation and decline of the Iberian Empires.

Considered a European and World History. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program.

3

HIS 244

Colonial Latin America

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course is a survey of the historical, economic, political, social, and cultural development of colonial Latin America from before the European discovery to the era of independence. It addresses the major themes and substance of the three centuries of colonial government and an appreciation for the complexity and diversity of colonial Latin America.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs.

3

HIS 257

Modern Latin America

Offered: Fall Semester

This course seeks to locate Modern Latin America (c. 1800-present) within a global framework and to understand the origins and development of the political, economic, social, and cultural issues that challenge and define Latin America today, including US foreign policy and changing ethnic, gender, and class relations.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs.

3

HIS 270

Modern China

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An introduction to the dramatic transformations in China's political, economic and socio-cultural life from the seventeenth century to the present. The course will cover transitions from dynastic to republican to communist rule, encounters with the West, socio-economic reforms, and the challenges of modernization in the world's oldest continuous civilization and bureaucratic state.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Asian Studies minors.

3

HIS 271

World History I (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Fall Semester

This course examines the history of humanity from the emergence of our species to the early modern era. Explores how and why humans shifted from nomadic hunting and gathering to settled agriculture societies creating cities, states, and empires. Examines the consequences of this transition for human societies and the environment.

Considered a World History. Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

HIS 272

World History II (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Spring Semester

Examines the history of the human community from the early modern era to the present. Explores how and why industry, nation states, and European style economics have come to define the modern world. It analyzes the interconnections and interdependencies, nowadays called “globalization” that continue to define human historical development.

Considered a World History. Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

HIS 277

History of Brazil

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines the history of Brazil from 1500 to the present and explores its richly diverse culture, politics, economy, and geography that ultimately tie it to the histories of Europe, Africa, Asia, the U.S. Major themes include: race relations, national development, military dictatorships, and popular culture.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs.

3

HIS 278

History of the Islamic World I

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores the historical development of Islamic societies from the pre-Islamic period to roughly 1500 CE. We will develop a nuanced understanding of cultural, intellectual, spiritual, political and economic themes important to the formation of classical Islamic civilization, through studying primary texts in translation, visual arts and contemporary scholarship.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies and Anthropology minors.

3

HIS 286

Asian American History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Survey of Asian migration to and experiences in the United States from mid-nineteenth century to the present. Follows East, Southeast and Asian migrants through gold mines and sugar plantations, on the first transcontinental railroad and on agricultural frontiers, through struggles over citizenship and identity politics. Themes include immigration, race relations and multiculturalism in modern United States history.

Considered a United States and World History.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and American Studies programs.

3

HIS 290

History of the Islamic World II

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores the historical development of Muslim societies from roughly 1500 CE to the present. We will develop a nuanced understanding of cultural, intellectual, spiritual, political and economic themes important to the contemporary Muslim world in its global context, through studying primary texts in translation, visual arts and contemporary scholarship.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies and Anthropology minors.

3

HIS 323

Africa in Stories: History, Literature and Film

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Africa is the site of rich intellectual and cultural diversity. It is the site of fundamental traditions and turning points in the larger story of humanity. African histories have been narrated in diverse ways by outsiders and by Africans themselves. Each story comes from a religious, political and intellectual vantage point. In this course, we will explore and critically examine the ways in which these stories have both expressed and shaped history.

Considered a World History.

3

HIS 349

The Inquisition: Myth and History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Explores the myths and history of the Inquisition as a social, political and religious institution in Europe, the Americas, and in Goa, India, from its Medieval inception to its final abolition in the nineteenth century. Students will seek to understand why it was created, how it functioned, the impact it had on the societies that sustained it, and why it was finally abolished.

Considered a European and World History.Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

HIS 353

A World at War

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Organized violence represents one of the most common of human activities. Warfare shapes, and is shaped by, deep seated political, social, economic, religious, and technological values and attitudes. For good or ill, warfare has played, and continues to play, a key role in shaping the world we live in. The course explores warfare and its consequences from a world historical perspective from Paleolithic times to ancient China and the Middle East to modern day forms of state and extra-state violence.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

HIS 362

World History Seminar: Topical

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Offers an opportunity to study a specific area or problem in World history in greater depth. Seminar format focusing on discussion of primary sources and secondary literature. Alternating topics to be announced prior to registration.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a World History.

3

HIS 373

Asian Empires

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An exploration of imperial expansion by Europeans and Asian powers across the centuries, from the Mongols to the Spanish to the British, from Japan in World War II to present-day notions of a "Greater China." Themes include political, economic, and social legacies of empire.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

HIS 374

Bound Feet and Dragon Ladies: Women & Power in East Asia

Offered: Fall Semester

This course challenges western conceptions of Chinese and Japanese women as unwanted daughters, submissive wives, and exotic geishas. We explore this complex history by studying women's oppression and agency, their evolving socio-political roles, and the construction of gender ideals - male and female - through close examination of popular culture, film, art, and literature.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing and above.
Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Anthropology, Asian Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

Complete One Historical Theory and Writing Course

Code Course Credits

HIS 420

Historical Theory and Writing (WID)

Offered: Spring Semester

The course explores the nature and study of history including historical theory, historical evidence, and historical writing.

Prerequisite(s): History majors and minor only. Sophomore standing.
Fulfills the General Education Writing in the Disciplines requirement.

4