Environmental Sciences & Studies Minor Requirements

Program Director:Susan Mooney Office: Shields Science Center 104 Phone: 508-565-1171smooney@stonehill.edu

The Environmental Sciences & Studies minor provides introductory knowledge in several areas of knowledge, as well as the opportunity to connect the program to one's major. For example, a typical program for a student majoring in Political Science might be: ENV 200 - Principles of Environmental Science; POL 255 - Environmental Policy and Politics; ENV 325 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems ; ECO 327 - Environmental Economics; BIO 307 - Ecology; and ENV 301 - Water Resource Management.

The minor in Environmental Sciences and Studies requires the completion of six courses.

Complete the Following Requirement

Code Course Credits

ENV 200

Principles of Environmental Science

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Fundamentals of the life sciences and physical sciences as they pertain to our environmental problems and solutions, as well as consideration of the pertinent social sciences such as economics. This interdisciplinary science course teaches relevant basic research techniques, and students will conduct research on real environmental problems.

This course includes field trips/work, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

Complete Two Natural Science Courses

At least one course must be at the 300-level or above

Code Course Credits

BIO 290

Scientific Methods: The Ocean

Offered: Spring Semester

History of marine science. Ocean environmental factors. Diversity of organisms adapted to different marine communities. Value of marine resources. Some lab work involving microscopy and dissection. Independent visit to the New England Aquarium outside of class time required.

Prerequisite(s): This course is not open to Biology (B.A. or B.S.) majors or minors.
Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

BIO 303

Environmental Botany

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2016, 2018

Structure and function of lower and higher plants. Ecological principles. Evolutionary relationships.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 and (BIO 102 or ENV 200).
This course fulfills the Environmental/Ecological requirement.

4

BIO 305

Marine Ecosystems

Offered: Fall Semester

Physical, chemical, and biological features of marine ecosystems. Ecological principles. Study of the local Massachusetts coastal region.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, (BIO 102 or ENV 200) and Junior or Senior standing.
This course fulfills the Environmental/Ecological requirement.

4

BIO 307

Ecology

Offered: Spring Semester

Structure and dynamics of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Mathematical models.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 102, (BIO 101 or ENV 200) Junior or Senior standing.
This course fulfills the Environmental/Ecological requirement.

4

BIO 309

Microbiology

Offered: Spring Semester

A survey of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria. Topics include: microbial cell biology, growth, metabolism, and genetics; control of microbial growth; host-microbe interactions; and environmental microbiology.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 211 and Junior and Senior standing.
This course fulfills either the Molecular/Cellular or Organismal requirement.

4

BIO 312

Vertebrate Physiology

Offered: Spring Semester

Principles governing the function of excitable and contractile tissues, respiration, circulation, kidney function, and osmoregulation in vertebrates with emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 and BIO 102.
This course fulfills the Organismal requirement.

4

BIO 323

Evolution

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Mechanisms of evolutionary change. Classical and molecular approaches to evolutionary analysis will be introduced and primary literature will be used to illustrate current examples. Problem-based learning will be used in the laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, BIO 102, and Junior or Senior standing.

4

BIO 407

Ornithology

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2015, 2017

Ornithology is the study of birds. Lecture covers a variety of topics as they apply to birds, including evolution, ecology, behavior, and conservation. Lab focuses on identification and observation of birds, with field trips to local destinations and a museum bird collection.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 102 (Recommended: BIO 311 and BIO 323)
This course fulfills the Organismal requirement and may be applied to the Environmental Science major or minor. This course may be approved to fulfill the Biology Capstone with approval of the faculty member supervising the Capstone project and the Department Chair before the first day of classes.

4

BIO 419

Wetlands: Ecology, Hydrology, Restoration

Offered: Fall Semester

Role of wetlands in hydrology and landscape ecology. Functions of marshes, swamps and bogs in water and nutrient cycles and in biodiversity. Links between wetlands and human activities (agriculture, coastal development, fisheries). Legal framework for protection/restoration of wetlands.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites: One year introductory science (biology, chemistry or physics); two semesters of upper-level science.
Marine Studies Consortium course. Students should apply through Prof. Burkholder.

3

BIO 416

Adaptation to the Environment

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2014, 2016

Explores physiological adaptations that allow organisms to survive various challenges to homeostasis in harsh environments. The role of physiological parameters such as size, metabolism, and conductance in ecology. Students will present, discuss, and critically evaluate data from a variety of sources.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101, BIO 102 and two 300 or 400 level biology courses.
This course fulfills the Organismal requirement.

3

CHM 250

Global Biogeochemistry: Building a Habitable World

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017, 2019

A study of the earth as a dynamic system governed by the interplay between biological, geological and chemical processes. These processes are what make the planet hospitable for life. This understanding is needed to address the environments issues we face today. Furthermore, these processes have shaped the co-evolution of life and the planet.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 or CHM 113.
Course may be applied to the Environmental Science and Studies Programs.

3

CHM 331

Analytical Chemistry

Offered: Spring Semester

This course provides an in-depth study of chemical equilibrium in acid-base, complexation, oxidation-reduction and precipitation reactions, as well as incorporates a survey of analytical instrumentation. Quantitative analysis methods, including titrations, spectroscopy, chromatography, and potentiometry, are discussed and performed with rigorous statistical evaluation of experimental data in a 4-hour weekly laboratory session.

Prerequisite(s): CHM 221 (with a grade of C- or better - starts with the Class of 2019)..
Fulfills the Statistical Reasoning requirement.

4

ENV 295

Physical Geology

Offered: Fall Semester

A systems approach to geology and landforms, including ecosystems that develop on the abiotic substrate. Scientific study of the earth's modern and ancient lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: ENV 200
This course includes substantial field work both on and off campus, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.

4

ENV 325

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduction to geographical information systems technology, focusing on spatial data acquisition, development and analysis in the science and management of natural resources. Topics covered include basic data structures, data sources, data collection, data quality, geodesy and map projections, spatial and tabular data analysis, digital elevation data and terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, and cartographic layout. Laboratory exercises provide practical experiences that complement the theory covered in lecture.

Prerequisite(s): ENV 200.
Course may be applied to the Data Science program.

4

ENV 326

Sustainable Agriculture

Offered: Fall Semester

We will study the economic, ecological and social components of sustainable agriculture in the context of growing human populations and climate change. Students will assist in leading class discussions on these interdisciplinary topics and actively engage with material covered in the literature as they participate in the classroom and at the farm.

Prerequisite(s): ENV 200
This course includes field trips/work, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

ENV 360

Introduction to Oceanography

Offered: Fall Semester

This course is designed to be a fundamental introduction to ocean sciences. Students will explore the physical and biological processes that govern the ocean's circulation and marine life. Topics include waves and currents, marine life and ecosystems, tides, beach erosion and the way the ocean is being affected by global climate change.

Prerequisite(s): One year of chemistry. Environmental Science or Studies, Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, or Physics majors only.
This course includes substantial field work off campus, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.

3

ENV 376

Topics in Environmental Sciences

Offered: Offered Fall 2016 and Spring 2017

This special topics course may be offered by faculty in a focused area of environmental science and may vary from semester to semester.

Prerequisite(s): Vary by topic.
Course may be taken twice.

3

Complete Two Humanities and Social Science Courses

Code Course Credits

ECO 327

Environmental Economics

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Topics in natural resource and energy economics and environmental regulation, include the allocation, development, conservation, and scarcity of natural resources. We study pollution control through taxes, quotas and standards using cost-benefit models as a policy guide. Types of energy resources, substitutability, conversion and the relevance of energy to economic growth is discussed.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 or the First-Year Seminar equivalent.

3

ENV 202

Nature Writing (WID)

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2016, 2018

This course explores how nature writing helps develop and deepen a sense of self and a sense of place. We will read and write in the genre constantly. We will take field trips during and outside of class in order to explore the environments in and around Stonehill. Each student's best essay will be published in a collection at the end of the semester.

Prerequisite(s): ENV 200. Open to Environmental Science and Studies majors.
This course includes field trips/work, and requires walking outdoors over uneven terrain, often in less than ideal weather. Students who may have difficulty navigating uneven terrain should contact the Office of Accessibility Resources at 508-565-1306 or accessibility-resources@stonehill.edu at least two weeks in advance of the course to allow for planning around accommodation needs.Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement for Environmental Studies majors.

3

ENV 270

Environmental Ethics

Offered: Spring Semester

This course considers traditional ethics and contemporary, radical approaches to discern the "good" in human-nature relations. Students engage in collaborative projects that engage the campus in changing behavior to better meet the relevant ethical good.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Philosophy course.
Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.

3

ENV 275

Environmental Law

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores rationales for environmental protection; the choice of policy instruments to address environmental problems; and the roles played by governmental and non-governmental actors. Practical experience with issues of environmental law will be gained through a partnership with the Natural Resources Trust of Easton.

Prerequisite(s): ENV 200 or POL 123.

3

ENV 299

Ecology, Theologies and Worldviews

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

How does our world function? Where do we fit, ecologically and cosmically? Methodological and historical approaches to understanding reality from scientific and religious perspectives. Ecological principles, biodiversity and evolution. Contributions to ecospiritualities, ecotheologies, and community and global sustainability by Catholic and other Christian and world religions.

Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions and Natural Scientific Inquiry requirements.

3

ENV 301

Water Resource Management

Offered: Fall Semester

Offered through the Massachusetts Bay Marine Studies Consortium. Interdisciplinary examination of water, our most precious natural resource. A look at water from scientific, historical, and cultural viewpoints. Survey of contemporary water problems in all dimensions: political, economic, and technological.

Students may not take both ENV 301 and ENV 302 - Coastal Zone Management.

3

ENV 375

Topics in Environmental Studies

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This special topics course may be offered by faculty in a focused area of environmental study and may vary from semester to semester.

Prerequisite(s): Vary by topic.
This course may be taken twice.

3

POL 255

Environmental Policy and Politics

Offered: Spring Semester

Global climate change, mass extinctions, polluted waterways, hazardous waste dumps, oil spills, and nuclear meltdowns. Concerns about the health and integrity of the environment have garnered much attention since the 1960s. This course examines the nature and extent of public policy-making that addresses these and other environmental issues.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 383

Environmental Justice

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2017, 2019

This course explores how the environment relates to social justice. How are environmental challenges in the United States as well as internationally connected to deep structural injustices related to class, race and gender? We will read moral philosophy and political theory as well as social scientific and historical research. Then we will apply the theories to a few cases of environmental injustice: hazardous waste disposal, food justice, climate change, and inter-generational justice.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Philosophy course, or POL 110 or POL 171.
Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the Environmental Science and Studies programs.

3

REL 276

EcoSpirituality

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course will invite students to reflect on the insights that spiritual and religious movements of the modern West might bring to the ecological challenges faced by the world today. Students will encounter the work of several influential theologians, but they will predominantly be challenged to develop practical strategies through which they can take environmental action now, bringing spiritual reflection to the problem of physical climate change.

Prerequisite(s): One Cornerstone Religious Studies course.
Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.

3

REL 329

Justice, Peace, Ecology

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

The local and global environmental crisis is examined from the perspective of contemporary theological developments, recent biblical scholarship, ecumenical statements, and Roman Catholic social teaching communicated in various papal and episcopal statements on the current crisis.

Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.

3

REL 373

Buddhism, Nature & Environmental Ethics

Offered: Fall Semester

An exploration of traditional Buddhist views of nature, especially in the Zen tradition, in relation to popular images of Buddhism and recent statements by Buddhist thinkers about environmental issues. Drawing from the field of Environmental Ethics, this course will also consider what a rigorous Buddhist environmental ethic might entail.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Religious Studies Cornerstone Course.
Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

SOC 222

Environmental Sociology

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

What does it mean to adopt a constructionist approach to "nature" and the environment? By looking at local, national, and global issues, this course will consider the social structural and cultural sources of environmental degradation, the emergence of environmental movements, and the intersection of justice and environmental issues.

Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

SOC 328

Community Organizing: People, Power & Change

Offered: Spring Semester

Covers theoretical frameworks and practical skills necessary to identify, recruit, and develop leadership, build community around that leadership, and build power from that community. The reflective practice of the course is structured around work in an organizing project (e.g. youth, community, electoral, union, or issue) designed to achieve a real outcome by semester's end.

Corequisite(s): SOC 101 (may be taken concurrently).
Course may be applied to the American Studies and the Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

VPS 223

The Nature of Art: Discovering the Artist Within

Offered: Spring Semester

Through the intersection of art and biology and using the act of “journaling” and art as a vehicle for investigation, students explore their inner voices while looking outward to observe the natural world.

3

Complete One Additional Course

  • The sixth course may come from either category above.

Note:

Minors may not enroll in the following Environmental senior capstone experiences: ENV 470, ENV 475, ENV 490, ENV 496, or ENV 497.