Courses

Course Code Credits

Biological Principles I

Fall semester introduces the concepts of molecular biology, the cell, energetics, genetics, and ecology. Spring semester is an introduction to the structure, function, and diversity of living organisms. Three hours of laboratory per week. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 75.

BIO101 4

Biological Principles II

Fall semester introduces the concepts of molecular biology, the cell, energetics, genetics, and ecology. Spring semester is an introduction to the structure, function, and diversity of living organisms. Three hours of laboratory per week. Pre-requisite: BIO 101. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 72.

BIO102 4

Scientific Methods: The Ocean

History of marine science. Ocean environmental factors. Diversity of organisms adapted to different marine communities. Value of marine resources. Some lab work involving microscopy and dissection. Independent visit to the New England Aquarium outside of class time required. Does not count as a course towards Biology, Biochemistry and Neuroscience majors. Limited to 24.

BIO290 3

Environmental Botany

Structure and function of lower and higher plants. Ecological principles. Evolutionary relationships. Three hours of laboratory or field work per week. (ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OPTION) Pre-requisites: BIO 101 and BIO 102 or ENV 200. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 24.

BIO303 4

Marine Ecosystems

Physical, chemical, and biological features of marine ecosystems. Ecological principles. Study of the local Massachusetts coastal region. Three hours of laboratory or field work per week. ( ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OPTION) Pre-requisites: BIO 101 and BIO 102 or ENV 200. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 20.

BIO305 4

Ecology

Structure and dynamics of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Mathematical models. Three hours of laboratory or field work per week. (ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OPTION) Pre-requisites: BIO 101 and BIO 102 or ENV 200. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 40.

BIO307 4

Microbiology

A survey of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria. Topics include: microbial cell biology, growth, metabolism, and genetics; control of microbial growth; host-microbe interactions; and environmental microbiology. Two one-and-one-half hour laboratory periods per week. (STRUCTURAL ORGANISMIC) Pre-requisites: BIO 101 and BIO 102 and BIO 211. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 40.

BIO309 4

Vertebrate Physiology

Principles governing the function of excitable and contractile tissues, respiration, circulation, kidney function, and osmoregulation in vertebrates with emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis. Three hours of laboratory per week. (FUNCTIONAL ORGANISMIC) Pre-requisites: BIO 101 and BIO 102 or permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors only or permission of the instructor. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 20.

BIO312 4

Evolution

Mechanisms of evolutionary change. Classical and molecular approaches to evolutionary analysis will be introduced and primary literature will be used to illustrate current examples. Problem-based learning will be used in the laboratory. Three hours of laboratory per week. Pre-requisites: BIO 211 and BIO 212. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 20.

BIO323 4

First-Year Sem: General Chemistry I: The Environment and Society

This course explores key topics in chemistry, including: atoms, molecules, measurements, bonding, aqueous solutions, and thermodynamics. Applications are introduced related to the environmental theme, i.e., ozone depletion, global warming, water quality, and energy. Through reading, writing, and class discussions, students learn to understand critical environmental issues at the molecular-level. Six hours of combined class/laboratory each week. Fulfills the Cornerstone Natural Scientific Inquiry Requirement, and is the equivalent to CHM 113 General Chemistry I. Limited to 16.

CHM111 5

General Chemistry I

The fundamentals of chemistry are covered including: matter and measurement, atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, and an introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibrium. Six hours of combined class/laboratory each week. Limited to 24.

CHM113 4

Organic Chemistry I

The basics of organic chemistry are covered including: structure and bonding of alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons and alkynes; functional groups containing heteroatoms; chromatography; spectroscopy; stereochemistry; methods of studying organic reaction; and an introduction to mechanisms of organic reactions. Three periods of lecture and a four-hour laboratory session each week. Pre-requisite: CHM 113 (or an equivalent CHM First-Year Seminar). A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 35.

CHM221 4

Organic Chemistry II

The mechanistic and synthetic organic chemistry relating to nucleophilic substitution, elimination, additions to carbon-carbon multiple bonds, aromatic substitution, addition and substitution at carbonyls, substitution alpha to carbonyls, rearrangements, and polymerizations. The organic chemistry of natural compounds (e.g. peptides, carbohydrates, etc.) is introduced. Three periods of lecture and a four-hour laboratory session each week. Pre-requisite: CHM 221. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 30.

CHM222 4

General Chemistry II

The course further develops the introductory physical and analytical chemistry initiated in CHE 113, while introducing new topics in order to complete the coverage of all general chemistry concepts. The topics covered include gases, states of matter, solutions, nuclear chemistry, and an in depth treatment of kinetics and the equilibria of acid-base, solution, and electrochemical reactions. Three periods of lecture and a three-hour laboratory session each week. Pre-requisite: CHM 113 (or an equivalent CHM First-Year Seminar). Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. A lab section must be selected with the course. Limited to 30.

CHM232 4

First-Year Seminar: The Undercover Economist

Economics is the study of how to get the most out of life and to help others to do so as well. Your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to develop your economic lens, seek out various mysteries that surround us, and discover both the seen and unseen. Fulfills the Cornerstone Social Scientific Inquiry Requirement, and is the equivalent to ECO 176 Microeconomic Principles. Limited to 16.

ECO111 4

Environmental Economics

Topics in natural resource and energy economics and environmental regulation, include the allocation, development, conservation, and scarcity of natural resources. We study pollution control through taxes, quotas and standards using cost-benefit models as a policy guide. Types of energy resources, substitutability, conversion and the relevance of energy to economic growth will be discussed. Pre-requisite: ECO 176. Limited to 25.

ECO327 3

Ecological Representatives

Students enrolled will learn the basics of ecological sustainability, and then design and implement education programs for their peers (in their residence hall or among the commuter population). Open to first-year and sophomore students only. Course is repeatable for credit. Limited to 15.

ENV101 1

Principles of Environmental Science

Fundamentals of the life sciences and physical sciences as they pertain to our environmental problems and solutions, as well as consideration of the pertinent social sciences such as economics. This interdisciplinary science course teaches relevant basic research techniques for field and lab work, and students will conduct research on real environmental problems. Limited to 24.

ENV200 3

Environmental Ethics

This course will satisfy the requirement under Moral Reasoning. Moral theory aims to discover actions that are universally binding while allowing for individual differences and various circumstances. This course examines ethical theories as applied to contemporary problems and specifically problems related to the natural environment. Open to juniors and seniors. Limited to 24.

ENV270 3

Environmental Law

This course explores rationals for environmental protection; the choice of policy instruments to address environmental problems; and the roles palyed by governmental and non-governmental actors. Practical experiencewith issues of environmental law will be gained through a partnership with the Natural Resources Trust of Easton. Limited to 25.

ENV275 3

Environmental Geology

A systems approach to geology and landforms, including ecosystems that develop on the abiotic substrate. Scientific study of the earth's modern and ancient lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Includes substantial field work both on and off campus. Limited to 24.

ENV295 3

Water Resource Management

Offered through the Massachusetts Bay Marine Studies Consortium. Interdisciplinary examination of water, our most precious natural resource. A look at water from scientific, historical, and cultural viewpoints. Survey of contemporary water problems in all dimensions: political, economic, and technological.

ENV301 3

Coastal Zone Management

Current issues in coastal environmental affairs. Scientific, legal, economic, management, and technical aspects of coastal issues are integrated into problem-solving exercises. History of the degradation and clean-up of Boston Harbor. Pre-requisite: course in biology, chemistry, geology, or environmental planning.

ENV302 3

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Introduction to geographical information systems technology, focusing on spatial data acquisition, development and analysis in the science and management of natural resources. Topics covered include basic data structures, data sources, data collection, data quality, geodesy and map projections, spatial and tabular data analysis, digital elevation data and terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, and cartographic layout. Laboratory exercises provide practical experiences that complement the theory covered in lecture. Limited to 20.

ENV325 4

Climate Science

An overview of the Earth's climate system, including major physical and chemical components and interactions. Students will acquire the scientific perspective necessary to competently assess issues related to current climate change concerns. Pre-requisite: CHM 113 or CHM 221. Limited to 24.

ENV350 3

Topics in Environmental Studies

This special topics course may be offered by faculty in a focused area of environmental study and may vary from semester to semester. This course may be taken twice. Limited to 24.

ENV375 3

Topics in Environmental Sciences

This special topics course may be offered by faculty in a focused area of environmental science and may vary from semester to semester. Course may be taken twice. Limited to 24.

ENV376 3

Internship in Environmental Studies

Opportunity for qualified students to work in the environmental industry under professional supervision. Open to senior Environmental Studies majors only. Must be approved by the Program Director and the Faculty member supervising the Internship. Limited to 5.

ENV475 3

Directed Study

Opportunity for upper level students to do advanced work in a specialized area of environmental studies. Open to senior Environmental Studies majors only. Permission of Program Director. Must be approved by the Program Director and the Faculty member supervising the Directed Study. Limited to 5.

ENV490 3

Senior Thesis

Independent scholarly work under the guidance of a faculty member, resulting in a substantial written work. Open to senior Environmental Studies majors only. Must be approved by the Program Director and the Faculty member supervising the Thesis. Limited to 5.

ENV496 3

Environmental Policy & Politics

The environment as a political issue, the rise of environmental concerns in America; the influence of public opinion on environmental policies; and some of the conflicts between the values of economic growth, energy needs, and environmental quality will be examined. Limited to 25.

POL255 3

Justice, Peace, Ecology

The local and global environmental crisis is examined from the perspective of contemporary theological developments, recent biblical scholarship, ecumenical statements, and Roman Catholic social teaching communicated in various papal and episcopal statements on the current crisis. Limited to 25.

REL329 3

Buddhism, Nature & Environmental Ethics

An exploration of traditional Buddhist views of nature, especially in the Zen tradition, in relation to popular images of Buddhism and recent statements by Buddhist thinkers about environmental issues. Drawing from the field of Environmental Ethics, this course will also consider what a rigorous Buddhist environmental ethic might entail. Pre-requisite: One Religious Studies Cornerstone Course. Limited to 25.

REL373 3

First-Year Seminar: Writing Nature: The Climate Change Controversy

Climate change is as much and idea that can be studies through culture as it is physical phenomenon that can be observed and quantified. Thus, rather than beginning with technological or scientific questions about how to solve climate change, this course will ask: why do we disagree about climate change? Limited to 16.

WRI114 4