English Courses

Code Course Credits

ENG 100

Island Living/Island Leaving (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This seminar explores the literature of islands. This will be a semester-long inquiry into how the unique conditions of island living shape literature and culture. We will study texts about castaways, pirates, tourists, islanders, and adventurers in order to discern what makes stories about islands so compelling and enduring.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 110, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Rites of Passage: Metamorphosis in Western Literature (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course introduces students to the methods and strategies of critical thinking and writing, focusing on the theme of transformation (physical and otherwise) in Western literature, from Ovid through Shakespeare and on to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Through close reading of our key texts, we will explore issues of language, power, gender, race, class, and identity formation, and consider the ways in which literature is itself a process of metamorphosis.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 111 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 111, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

First Person: Film Theory/Film Practice (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This seminar will introduce students to film, and film representation, through theory and practice: intensive study of film language, technique, and theory will be followed by a basic introduction to film-making (creating short films). This will enable students to apply the theories and techniques they have learned in class.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 112 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 112, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Machine Culture: Our Technology, Ourselves (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Spring Semester

This course explores the representation of technology as created by artists from ancient Athens to the 21st century. Questions we will pursue: is technology the friend or foe of humanity? Will machines enable our perfection or enhance our flaws? Should our machines be more or less like us?

Prerequisite(s): ENG 113 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 113, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

The Importance of Being Lazy: Idlers, Loafers, and Slackers in Literature (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

The figure of the shiftless lounger who resists the powerful imperative to work hard (or to work at all) has long been a literary mainstay. In this course we will read works from Shakespeare to Melville and beyond to ask questions about the cultural opposition of work and leisure. You will get acquainted with famous slackers from various significant moments in western cultural history, in poems, dramas, novels, and films-from Shakespeare's history play Henry IV, Part 1, for instance, in which the heir to the English throne prefers to hang around with sketchy characters in taverns rather than toil at the palace; to Herman Hesse's novel Narcissus and Goldmund, about an overachiever and a gifted bum; to the "Dude," a bowling slacker from Los Angeles in the Coen brothers' The Big Lebowski. You will also read widely in social and cultural history on the subject of idleness, and become familiar with key literary terms and concepts.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 115 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 115, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Literature in Translation? (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Many of the texts that you read in your core courses are translations into English. What exactly does it mean to read a text in translation? We will ask and answer that question, using these 19th-century texts: Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal/Flowers of Evil; Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Tolstoy, Anna Karenina.

Corequisite(s): ENG 116 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 116, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

The Subject of Travel (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

One of the oldest and most intriguing themes found in Western literature is that of movement, travel and exploration. From the Classical epics of Homer and Virgil to the narratives of Renaissance exploration to the 20th century novel, travel and the subsequent descriptions of oneself and others form a very broad area of literature. In fact, the phrase "the subject of travel literature" can be understood in two ways: first, travel literature as a type or sub-genre of literature and, second, how we read individuals as "subject" to the places they find themselves in, and how they in turn describe and create people and places in language as textual subjects. In this course, we'll explore both of these levels - the generic and the subjective - and come to terms with the problem of representing people and places which at first seem quite alien to us. We'll also explore the metaphor of reading and writing as themselves a type of "travel."

Prerequisite(s): ENG 117 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 117, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

War and Gender in Literature and Film (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall Semester

How do cultures and societies as well as individual artists narrate the experience of war and what it means to be a soldier? We will explore how writers and filmmakers have addressed the tensions between societal expectations and the reality of war, as well as the challenges they see in telling stories about what are essentially often traumatic experiences. How does trauma or memory affect the stories we tell about war? What is the relationship between the 'front' and the 'home', between those who serve and those who don't? In addition, we will discuss societal gender norms and expectations and the insights we might gain about how these norms operate in a particular society by looking at them in the context of war. How, in other words, does the experience of war a society goes through crystallize what that society thinks of the role of men and women, of "proper" masculine behavior, of what makes a "real" soldier (aka a "real" man), and so forth. In order to explore these and other questions, we will study poetry, short stories, letters, novels, as well as films dealing with World War I, Vietnam, and more recent wars in the Middle East and Afghanistan. Likely texts include the "Trench Poetry" of World War I, short fiction by Ernest Hemingway and Tim O'Brien, letters written by soldiers fighting in Vietnam, recent "war bloggers," and films such as Full Metal Jacket, Platoon, Jarhead, and Black Hawk Down.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 118 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 118, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Gods and Monsters (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course focuses on the dialogue between classical authors and later artists who re-visit, revise, re-voice the epic tradition. We will work on certain skills: close reading, engaging with and applying secondary literature, thinking through complex ideas, formulating readings of these texts. Authors will include Euripides, Homer, Ovid, Virgil, and Anne Carson We will also examine film, music, and dance.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 119 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 110, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

"The Lunatic, the Lover, and the Poet": Metaphor and the Unconscious (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores the connections between reading strategies encouraged by lyric poetry, fairy tales, and Freud's account of the operation of dream narratives. Texts to be examined include drama, fiction, and essays by such authors as William Shakespeare, Charles Perrault, Sigmund Freud, and Angela Carter, as well as poetry by W.H. Auden, W.S. Merwin, Sylvia Plath, Wallace Stevens, Adrienne Rich, and William Carlos Williams. We will also look at films from Alfred Hitchcock, David Kaplan, and Wes Craven.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 120 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 120, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Violence and Nonviolence (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

We only have to look around us to see that our world is defined in a fundamental way by violence. Writers and thinkers from various historical moments have both recognized the problem of violence in society and have offered critiques of it. Our study this term will be guided by the following question: what perspective does literature provide on the issues of violence and nonviolence in the world? We will encounter novelists, poets, playwrights, and essayists whose work contains original, thought-provoking, and moving representations of and reflections on violence and nonviolence. We will pose a number of additional questions of our readings: how do these texts represent the causes and consequences of violence? How do the texts convey the relationships among different types of violence - interpersonal, political, psychological, and socioeconomic? Is nonviolence a viable ethical position in these texts? How is nonviolence defined, and what, if any, are the impediments to lessening the violence of the world? Lastly, what might the role of literature, and art more generally, be in our imagining of nonviolence?

Prerequisite(s): ENG 121 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 121, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Seven Nobel Laureates (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

In this course students will read from and write about the work of seven recent winners of the Nobel Prize in Literature who write in English. The seven laureates whom we'll read are from various parts of the globe, but their recognition by the Nobel Committee suggests that their work speaks not just about its place of origin but to something beyond national borders. Is this perhaps what is meant by "world literature"? We'll explore this question and others via the fiction of South Africans Nadine Gordimer and J. M. Coetzee, American Toni Morrison, and Trinidadian-born Briton V. S. Naipaul; the poetry of Seamus Heaney of Ireland and Derek Walcott of Saint Lucia; and the plays of London-born Harold Pinter. Naturally, we'll read and discuss their Nobel lectures, too, as well as other prose works wherein our writers discuss why they write, for whom they write, and what they imagine the role of literature to be in the world.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 122 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 122, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

"In Sickness and in Health": Bodies in Literature (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: ENG 123: Fall 2016; ENG 100: Spring 2017

This course presents an introduction to the study and appreciation of literature. Our thematic focus is the representation of human bodies in the works of poets, dramatists, novelists, and essayists at various significant moments in western cultural history. As we read some famous and influential literary texts alongside less familiar works, we will become acquainted with key concepts and methodologies employed in literary studies. We follow, more or less, a historical track and begin the semester with Ovid's Metamorphoses, which set the standard for literary representations of the body, before turning to one of Shakespeare's more obscure works, Titus Andronicus, a bloody revenge drama, Miss Evers' Boys, a play about the infamous Tuskegee experiment, and finally Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis, a tale about a man who wakes one morning to find that he has turned into an insect. Midway through the course we will also read poetry by physicians and other health care workers. We examine films that deal with questions about human embodiment, but most of our time is devoted to the close reading of texts, to formulating arguments about literature, and to exploring methods of interpretation.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 123 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 123, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

On the Road: Encounters with the "Other" (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

In this course we will ask how authors from Homer to Kerouac write about journeying and encounters with "other" people, places, ideas, values, and modes of conduct. The texts we read come from disparate historical periods and from a variety of cultural contexts. As we investigate their formal and stylistic elements and their possible meanings, we will become acquainted with different literary modes, from poetry, to drama, to prose. Although the overarching theme of the course is the journey and the encounter with "otherness," the individual texts we read present very different engagements with the subject. The journeys about which we read may be mythic, factual, intellectual, spiritual, and/or artistic; they may constitute a rite of passage or initiation; they may be brief or interminable, alienating or rewarding; they may end tragically or lead to new understanding. The course emphasizes close reading and open questioning of cultural meaning. And these are some of the works you will encounter this semester: Homer's Odyssey; selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; Shakespeare's Tempest; Goethe's Faust; and Kerouac's On the Road.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 124 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 124, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

The Imaginary Primitive (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Our seminar will focus on how the modern idea of Western "civilization" took shape in response to the image of the non-European, "native." Specifically, we will examine the "primitive" (and the related figures of the "cannibal," the "savage," and the "barbarian") in British and French literature and visual art as the essential-if often invented-figure at the heart of modern concepts of empire, subjectivity, aesthetics, ethics, and culture. Although much of our work will concentrate on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, we will begin by examining several foundational early modern and Enlightenment-era texts to see how images of first contact between so-called "natives" and European explorers influenced more contemporary discourses of anthropology, biology, social science, psychoanalysis, and imperial politics. Readings will examine several key contact zones between European and non-European peoples: Africa, India, Oceania, and the Middle East. Our semester will end with a section devoted to contemporary responses to European constructions of racial 'Otherness' from the Sudan, France, and England. Authors to be covered include William Shakespeare, Michel de Montaigne, Montesquieu, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Rudyard Kipling, Paul Gauguin, Joseph Conrad, W. Somerset Maugham, E.M. Forster, George Orwell, Marjane Satrapi, Tayeb Salih, and Zadie Smith. We will also look at art by Gauguin, Jean-Léon Gérôme, Man Ray, and Pablo Picasso, among others, as well as films such as Cannibal Tours and Dirty, Pretty Things.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 125 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 125, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Love and Other Difficulties (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

What does it mean to desire something-or someone? What is the nature of the relationship between the enamored and the object of desire? In this course, we will explore love and desire as fundamental aspects of identity and self-awareness as well as central themes of literature across diverse cultures and historical periods. Through readings in poetry, drama and fiction, we will examine desire in its many forms, from desire for friendship and familial connection to romantic and libidinal desire, to the desire for material goods and power. Authors to be considered may include Plato, Ovid, Shakespeare, Keats, Brontë, Freud, Rilke, Joyce, Kafka, Nabokov, Wilde, Mann, Duras, Neruda, García Márquez, and Morrison.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 126 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 126, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

The Art of Memory (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will be an interdisciplinary study of memory that encourages students to investigate both critically and creatively how different artists, writers, and filmmakers depict memory. We will discuss not only how it's used in their work, but also how they represent the way it functions and how different approaches and mediums reveal or expose different aspects of experience. Artists, writers, filmmakers and composers we may explore include: Jonathan Caouette's Tarnation, Chris Marker's La Jetee, poet Marie Howe's What the Living Do, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time, Joe Brainard's I Remember, as well as various essays (by authors such as Joel Agee and bell hooks). We will also examine the artwork of Christian Boltanski, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn, as well as composer William Basinski's Disintegration Loops.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 127 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 127, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Wonderlands (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

A portal opens to another world: what wonders will we find there? In this course, we will travel down rabbit holes, through secret doorways, across borders, and back in time, encountering the stuff of dreams-and sometimes nightmares. Along the way, we will ask what these alternate realities tell us about our own world and our own imaginations. Texts may include: Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, J.M. Barrie's Peter and Wendy, The Wachowskis' The Matrix, Neil Gaiman's Coraline, Hayao Miyazaki's Spirited Away, Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth, Octavia Butler's Kindred, and short works by Margaret Cavendish, Jorge Luis Borges, Ray Bradbury, and Adrienne Rich.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 128 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 128, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Monstrous Representations (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

The topic of this course is, simply put, monsters. These figures have occupied the imagination for centuries. Even today, they continue to haunt our cultural consciousness in literature and film. Horrifying, strange, sometimes even seductive, monsters inhabit the space of difference, calling into question cultural values (such as those of gender, race, sexuality, etc.) and exposing the anxieties, fears, and desires of the cultures that generate them. But what does it mean to be a monster? What separates monsters from men? What happens when these boundaries are crossed? Why do monsters always return? In what ways do they change with each new return? How do they stay the same? In this course, we will examine these and other questions as we encounter monstrous representations from a variety of literary periods and genres. Through studying figures as diverse as the Blemmyae of medieval travel narratives, the creations of Dr. Moreau, and Bram Stoker's Count Dracula, we will investigate what these monsters can tell us about the cultures that create and consume them.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 129 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 129, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Fairy Tales, Folklore and Fantasy (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Fairy tales, folklore and fantasy are repositories for literary and cultural expression across the boundaries of period and genre. This course will use the lens of the fairy tale, its reinterpretation and adaptation, to introduce students to various literary genres, including poetry, prose and drama, as well as close reading, literary analysis, and critical thinking. Texts, from a diverse range of nineteenth- and twentieth-century authors, will be thematically linked through questions ofclass and gender that often surface in the re-imaginings of classic tales.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 130 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 130, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Extreme Makeovers: Transformative Texts (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall Semester

What links the Greek myths in Ovid's Metamorphoses, Bram Stoker's vampire novel Dracula, Rebecca West's psychological war story Return of the Solider, Disney's Beauty and the Beast, and Richard Linklater's recent film Boyhood? All are fascinated by "extreme makeovers" of sorts. This first year seminar will examine the ongoing appeal of such transformations in literature through close readings of a diverse selection of fiction, poetry, and film. In particular, we will explore the following questions: How are these extreme makeovers shaped by views about gender, psychology, sexuality, and otherness at different cultural moments? What do they suggest about the boundaries between human and animal? What do they reveal about the process of growing up? And does literature have the potential to transform us as readers, too?

Prerequisite(s): ENG 131 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 131, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Altered States: Literature and Intoxication (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Various types of altered states of consciousness have long been reflected in Western literature. Changes to identity -- not just states brought about by alcohol or drugs, but also spiritual or other intensely emotional experiences -- have been a broad theme explored by many authors, from Homer's Lotus eaters to the enchantments of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream to contemporary confessional memoir. In this course, we will explore the many ways in which altered states have been represented by authors, ranging from the celebratory to the repentant, and the ways in which they construct or challenge the identities of authors, characters and audiences. We will also consider the acts of writing and reading as themselves challenges to conventional identity.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 132 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 132, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

The Local and the Global (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

The Local and the Global: In this course we study the literature of place with a focus on the local (natural environment, home, and the city) as well as the global (travel, tourism, and imperialism) in order to explore how identities and communities are shaped by various social, cultural, and historical spaces. Possible texts include: Cisneros, House on Mango Street; McCarthy, The Road; Chekhov, The Cherry Orchard or Shakespeare, The Tempest; Kincaid, A Small Place; Schneider, The Wall Jumper; Wenders, Wings of Desire (film).

Prerequisite(s): ENG 133 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 133, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

American Women Writers (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

In this course, we will read poetry, drama, and fiction written by American women during the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. We will consider how gender identity is constructed by, and interacts with, race, class, history, geography, politics, and socio-economic realities in our country in an attempt to arrive at an understanding of a vision (or visions) American women writers seek to articulate and how this understanding of our culture(s) and lives helps inform and enhance American literature as a whole. In what ways do the social, political, and historical context that women have written from and the range of racial and class barriers they face inform the content or style of these works? How have these writers been categorized and evaluated based on gender? For that matter, how important is the identity of the author to the work in question? Are women's lives of universal importance to readers of both genders or do we risk ghetto-izing work written by women by identifying it as such? Be prepared to share your ideas and opinions, to think and reflect about what these writers and your peers say, and to respond thoughtfully.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 135 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 135, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

What is Beauty? A Literary Investigation (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course is centered on what seems like a straightforward question: what is beauty? We will spend the semester reading and discussing texts that attempt to answer that question - a question that merges as surprisingly complex and potentially of profound significance to our conceptions of love, happiness, and justice.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 136 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 136, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Americans Abroad (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

American writers have long been fascinated with Europe as place, idea, rite of passage, and site of reinvention. How have writers represented both "Europeanness" and "Americanness"? How have gender, race, sexuality, and aesthetics intersected with nationality? We will investigate these questions through readings of fiction, films, and theories of nationalism.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 137 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 137, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

American Gothic (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores the unsettling and uncanny elements in American literature. We will investigate the typical settings of gothic texts, including the wilderness, abandoned institutions (churches, asylums, prisons), and homes. Over the course of the semester we will meet the denizens of such locations and consider what disturbs the American dream.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 138 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 138, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

"Getting the Joke": Satire and Sentimentality (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

In this course, we'll read short works and excerpts of canonical Western literature in their social, historical, and literary contexts in order to "get the joke." Through careful reading and close analysis, students will explore intersections of satire and sentimentality in both their literary and colloquial contexts. Be forewarned: very often, the joke will be on us.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 139 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 139, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Daddy's Girls (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course focuses on the relationship between fathers and daughters as represented in literature from the classical age to the present day.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 140 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 140, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Between Two Worlds: Multicultural Literature and Film (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall Semester

In this course we study the work of African American, Native American, Chicana, Asian American, South Asian and Caribbean immigrant artists who explore what it means to live in the United States post-WWII until now. For African American artists the question has often most simply been: what does it mean to be black in America, and-more recently-how do black lives matter? For immigrants it's a struggle to figure out the old home in relation to the new home, old customs and stories in relation to new ones. For Native Americans it's often a matter of claiming a presence in a country that considers them little more than mascots. For Japanese Americans during World War II it's about figuring out what the "American" means when their entire community is interned because of the "Japanese" part of their heritage. We want to know how writers and filmmakers from these multi-ethnic communities have responded to the questions of navigating a predominantly white world, and negotiating various sites of belonging. We will study novels, short stories, poems, personal essays, a graphic novel, and films by artists such as James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, Sherman Alexie, Junot Diaz, Jamaica Kincaid, Julie Otsuka, Jhumpa Lahiri, Jessica Abel, Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing), Mira Nair (The Namesake), Ang Lee (The Wedding Banquet), and Chris Eyre (Smoke Signals).

Prerequisite(s): ENG 142 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 142, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Literature and the American South (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course looks at literature about the American South from the colonial era through contemporary culture. We will particularly focus on race and gender in literature and film about the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the emergence of the "New South."

Prerequisite(s): ENG 143 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 143, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Literary Evolutions (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Etymologically (at the word's root), literature is associated with "humane learning" and "literary culture" (see OED). Our primary goal in this course is to recognize the interdependence of literary evolution and human culture. We will explore how literature evolves over time and across discourses. Close readings of core texts and their offshoots will offer insight into the concepts of adaptation, intertextuality, and cultural capital. Finally, we shall analyze how authors revise key literary themes in the context of poetry, prose, drama, music, film and the graphic novel, and television.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 144 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 144, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Telling it Slant: Unreliable Narrators in American Literature (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Spring Semester

Should we trust the narrators of the literature we read? Why or why not? What about the "speakers" in poetry or the characters on stage in a play? In these works of fictions, moreover, is there a way to assess the reliability or unreliability of the voices telling us the story? How do these issues affect our experience of reading literature? This course use these questions to examine a diverse set of texts: selections from Emily Dickinson's poetry; Herman Melville's Benito Cereno; Henry James's The Turn of the Screw; Nella Larson's Passing; a play by Anna Deavere Smith; as well as short stories by Sherman Alexie, Kate Chopin, Junot Díaz, and Toni Morrison. Along with exploring these works, we will also read and discuss relevant secondary and theoretical work (from Wayne Booth, Peter Rabinowitz, and others) that can shed light on the challenges-and pleasures-of negotiating reliable and unreliable voices in literature.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 146 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 146, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 100

Romanticism and How To Live (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This cornerstone literature course reads major texts of the Romantic Age as explorations of paths toward the good life, broadly and diversely construed. Works by authors such as Blake, Wordsworth, Godwin, the Shelleys, Keats, and Austen will be read and analyzed in terms of the insights they provide on large and relevant topics such as justice, science, beauty, violence, among others; while responses to these Romantics texts from the Victorian Age through the present will be considered as well. We will not only learn to read Romantic texts carefully and thoroughly, but we will also begin to grasp the legacy of Romanticism in the present -- such as, for example, how Godwin's dilemma in "Political Justice" (whom would you save from a burning house if you had to choose between X and Y) provides the opening set-piece for Michael Sandel's influential contemporary exploration of justice.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 147 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as ENG 147, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

3 or 4

ENG 200

Introductory Topics in Literary Studies

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Introduction to the vocabulary and practices of literary-critical analysis and the skills of close reading with a focus on the major literary genres.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.

3

ENG 201

British Literature to 1700

Offered: Fall Semester

Introduction to English literary history through poetry, drama, and narrative from Anglo- Saxon roots to the development of British literary genres in the medieval and early modern periods.

4

ENG 202

Literary History II

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Exploration of literature in the modern period, paying particular attention to the development of genres, the expansion of the British Empire, and the emergence of the British and American literary traditions.

4

ENG 204

Drama

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Through the study of traditional and non-traditional types of drama (to include screenplays as well), students are introduced to new ways of classifying and reading texts. Designed for both entering and upper-level students with a particular emphasis on close reading.

3

ENG 205

Fiction

Offered: Spring Semester

Through the study of traditional and non-traditional types of fiction (to include short stories as well), students are introduced to new ways of classifying and reading texts. Designed for both entering and upper-level students with a particular emphasis on close reading.

3

ENG 220

Introductory Topics in Literature

Offered: Spring Semester

Introductory literary seminars that emphasize the development of writing and analytic skills necessary for upper-division English courses. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Priority given to first- and second-year students. Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ.

Prerequisite(s): Priority given to first- and second-year students.
Topics will vary from semester to semester. Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

ENG 221

Introductory Topics in Digital Humanities

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course features an introduction to a range of digital methods and tools for humanistic inquiry.

3

ENG 242

Topics in Creative Writing: Poetry

Offered: Fall Semester

An introduction to poetry writing that will include the examination of literary models in a variety of genres, writing exercises, and writing workshops.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the Creative Writing minor.

3

ENG 243

Topics in Creative Writing: Short Fiction

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An introduction to narrative writing, including description, setting, dialogue, characterization, plot.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the Creative Writing minor.

3

ENG 247

Topics in Catholicism and Literature

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An engagement with Catholic writers and themes in British and American Literature.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.

3

ENG 248

Catholic Literature and the Modern World

Offered: Spring Semester

Through literature and film this course will introduce students to the development of the Catholic imagination from the late nineteenth through the early twenty-first centuries. We will examine the struggle between the Catholic Church and modernity, which developed into a more cooperative relationship by the time of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), and which continues to evolve into the contemporary period.

Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.Course may be applied to the Catholic Studies program.

3

ENG 256

Madness and Insight: Modernist Psychopathology

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

What do we learn about ourselves from looking through the lens of madness? This course will explore how narratives of insanity from the 18th century to the present have shaped our understanding of human cognition, perception, emotion, desire, and the unconscious. Authors to be considered Descartes, Poe, Dostoevsky, Gilman, Schnitzler, Woolf, Kafka, Breton, Didion, Pynchon and DeLillo.

3

ENG 257

Global Detective Fiction

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical study of contemporary novels by authors offering new, globally inflected twists on an old form. Readings might include mysteries and crime fictions by Henning Mankell, Luiz Garcia Roza, Dennis Potter, Alexander McCall Smith, and Donna Leon.

3

ENG 258

Literature and Sports

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Students will read and study literature that draws on or engages in some way sports and its diverse cultures. Some of the stories, novels, and essays will be about sports; others will, for example, incorporate sports into their broader aesthetic and social visions; others still will use the culture of sport as the canvas on which to paint characters and their internal lives.

Course may be applied to the Sports, Science and Society program.

3

ENG 271

Film and Story

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An introduction to film art through a comparison of its distinguishing features with those of fiction and of drama.

Course may be applied to the Cinema Studies minor.

3

ENG 272

Film History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A survey of major film industries and canonical texts presented in a chronological order serving specific themes (for example, film-making in a given geographical region).

Course may be applied to the American Studies program and Cinema Studies minor.

3

ENG 273

Hitchcock

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A survey of Alfred Hitchcock's work and obsessions. This course welcomes students with no prior experience in the study of film. Additional screening time required.

Course may be applied to the American Studies, Cinema Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

ENG 279

Harry Potter: Magic, Muggles, and Metaphor

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2017, 2019

This course will immerse students in the world of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. Reading the novels as literary and cultural texts, the course will explore how Rowling creates an intricate alternative universe with parallel political and social dimensions. The course will examine the novel series as narrative and cultural artifacts, paying special attention to how the texts offer construct new notions of nation, authority, education, morality, folklore, and fandom.

3

ENG 280

Shakespeare for Everyone

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2018, 2020

This course provides a general introduction to the drama of William Shakespeare. We will carefully explore the genres that Shakespeare mastered - comedy, tragedy, romance, and the history play - by focusing primarily on how Shakespeare uses language to create character and dramatic tension and engages with larger ethical, social, and political questions.

3

ENG 300

Critical Theory

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Introduction to contemporary theory - its origin and framework - by examining literary criticism as an institutional discourse.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.
Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

ENG 301

Topics in Medieval Literature (WID)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A thematic study of texts, figures, and influences associated with the literature of the Middle Ages.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Writing-in-the Disciplines requirement.

4

ENG 304

Topics in Early Modern Literature (WID)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A thematic study of texts, figures, and influences associated with the literature of the early modern period.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Writing-in-the Disciplines requirement.

4

ENG 306

Topics in British Literature, 1700-1900 (WID)

Offered: Fall Semester

A critical analysis of various cultural and literary issues that emerge in British literature.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement.

4

ENG 307

Topics in British Literature, 1900 - Present

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical analysis of various cultural and literary issues that emerge in British Literature in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.

3

ENG 310

Topics in World and Comparative Literature

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical analysis of literature outside of the American and British traditions and/or a comparative look at themes across national literatures and traditions.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.

3

ENG 315

The Romantic Age

Offered: Fall Semester

A comprehensive study of the literature of the Romantic Age in British literature (1789-1832). Examination of the poetry, novels, drama, and non-fiction prose of the period with attention to aesthetic inheritance and historical context. Authors include Blake, Wordworth, Coleridge, Godwin, Burke, Wollstonecraft, Paine, Keats, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Byron, Austen, Scott, Hazlitt, De Quincey, Clare, and others.

3

ENG 322

Topics in World Cinema

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical study of specific topics related to cinema production in countries outside of Europe and North America.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the Cinema Studies minor

3

ENG 324

Topics in Television Studies

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of specific topics related to television genres or periods through application of contemporary critical theories.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and Cinema Studies minor.

3

ENG 326

Topics in American Cinema

Offered: Fall Semester

A critical study of specific topics related to the American narrative film.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the American Studies program, Gender & Sexuality Studies program and the Cinema Studies minor.

3

ENG 336

The Romance

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An historical survey of the romance from Heliodorus to the Harlequin.

3

ENG 344

Topics in Creative Non-fiction

Offered: Spring Semester

An introduction to the various practices of the emerging field of creative non-fiction, including memoir, personal essay, literary journalism, travel writing , and hybrid forms that blur the boundaries between fiction and nonfiction.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the Creative Writing minor.

3

ENG 345

Topics in Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

Offered: Fall Semester

This course will provide students who have already taken ENG 243 the opportunity to advance their fiction-writing skills and develop longer, more complex narrative forms.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 243 or Consent of Instructor.
Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the Creative Writing minor.

3

ENG 346

Topics in Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

Offered: Spring Semester

This course allows students to further develop the skills acquired in the beginning poetry workshop by concentrating on more complex aspects of poetic practice. Students will work on composing and revising their own poetry, critiquing peer work in a workshop setting, and reading the work of established poets.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 242 or Consent of Instructor.
Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the Creative Writing minor.

3

ENG 348

Topics in Religion and Literature

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course examines the emergence of spiritual themes and traditions in literary texts.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.

3

ENG 349

Irish Literature: Nationalism, Religion, Mother Ireland

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical analysis of various cultural and literary issues that emerge in Irish fiction, poetry, and drama.

Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.Course may be applied to the Irish Studies minor.

3

ENG 350

Chaucer

Offered: Spring Semester

A study of Chaucer's poetry, with attention to the cultural and political forces that shaped late medieval poetics.

3

ENG 351

The Calamitous 14th Century

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Focusing on the writing of Chaucer and Langland and their contemporaries, this course studies the representation of the social and literary upheavals of the late 14th century.

Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.

3

ENG 353

Shakespeare

Offered: Fall Semester

Close readings of Shakespeare’s work.

3

ENG 354

Shakespeare's Rivals

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A study of theater in early modern culture, with attention to the drama of Shakespeare's competitors: Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, and Middleton.

3

ENG 357

English and Irish Drama

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical survey of dramatic genres and texts from England and Ireland with a focus on specific themes and on performance texts.

Course may be applied to the Irish Studies minor.

3

ENG 358

Classical Backgrounds to English Literature

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An introduction to the literature of ancient Greece and Rome, including mythology, Greek drama, and the epic poems of Homer and Virgil.

3

ENG 359

Nineteenth-century British Poetry

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical reading of Romantic and Victorian poets, along with relevant prose.

3

ENG 360

American Literature to 1865

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A chronological survey of texts, figures, and influences associated with American literature of the period.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 361

American Literature, 1865-present

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A chronological survey of texts, figures, and influences associated with the period.

3

ENG 362

Topics in Poetry

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical reading of poetry. Topics vary from semester to semester.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 366

Topics in Twentieth-Century American Literature

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of themes in twentieth-century literature. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 367

Topics in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (WID)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of themes in nineteenth-century literature. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Writing-in-the Disciplines requirement. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

4

ENG 368

Race, Ethnicity, and American Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An exploration of the relationship between American racial and ethnic politics and twentieth-century American culture.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 369

African-American Literature

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An exploration of landmarks in African-American writing from the time of slavery to the contemporary period.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 371

Topics in Contemporary Literature

Offered: Fall Semester

A critical study of contemporary writing linked by thematic or theoretical interests.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.

3

ENG 372

'Zines, Chapbooks, and DIY Publishing

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Whether you are interested in poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, or cross genre writing, this course will help you explore ways to get your work into the world. Focusing on small press publishers, artist made books, 'zines, and literary journals. Creative writing experiments will result in your own independent publishing project which will be a chapbook, 'zine, or handmade book.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 242, ENG 243 or ENG 344.
Course may be applied to the Creative Writing program.

3

ENG 373

Gerard Manley Hopkins and his Contexts

Offered: Spring Semester

This course focuses on nineteeth-century poet Gerard Manley Hopkins in his various contexts: as a poet in the wake of the Romantic movement; as a Catholic convert and Jesuit in the wake of the Oxford Movement; as a Victorian engaged with and troubled by the social and political tumult around him.

Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.

3

ENG 380

Modern Poetry

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical analysis of issues of voice, persona, and genre in modern and contemporary poetry.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 381

Modern Drama

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical survey of world drama since the late nineteenth century.

3

ENG 382

American Drama

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A study of specific topics related to North American plays of the twentieth century.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 385

Taking the Victorians to the Movies

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An exploration of why the Victorians have never gone out of style, using films to understand the novels on which they are based and vice-versa.

3

ENG 389

Alternative Modernisms

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of the anti-colonial, feminist, and queer foundations of literary modernism between 1890 and 1945.

Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

ENG 390

Topics in Modernism (WID)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Critical study of representative literature from the modernist period.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Writing-in-the Disciplines requirement. Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

4

ENG 391

Topics in Gender & Sexuality Studies

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A study of issues of gender, race, and class as they emerge in critical and literary texts.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

ENG 392

Topics in Postcolonial and Global Literature (WID)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An investigation of themes within the frame of postcolonial studies. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Writing-in-the Disciplines requirement.

4

ENG 394

Sexuality and Textuality

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical examination of the definitions of sexual orientation found in diverse texts.

Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

ENG 395

Introduction to Postcolonial Literature and Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical introduction to the poetry, fiction, and drama of the postcolonial world. Discussions will be informed by an introduction to postcolonial theory.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies program and the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

ENG 398

Telling Tales: Theories of Narrative

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

The study of how and why we construct stories: an introduction to narrative theory, using texts from Jane Austen to comic books.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 200

3

ENG 422

English Capstone Seminar

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An examination of thematically related works within the framework of contemporary critical theory.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 300, ENG 391 or ENG 398.
Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Capstone requirement in English.Course may be applied to the Cinema Studies minor.

4

ENG 475

Internship in English

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Designed to give English majors an acquaintance with - and experience in - careers that extend from their training in the major. Internships provide a practicum where students work for a particular business and a seminar where students meet on a regular basis with the instructor.

Must complete the "U.S. Internship Request for Approval" process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship.

3

ENG 476

English Teaching Apprenticeship

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Designed for senior English majors seriously intending to pursue graduate study, this apprenticeship gives the students experience in creating and coordinating a general studies course under the direction of a faculty member.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 200 and ENG 300, and permission of Department Chairperson.
Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ.

3

ENG 496

Independent Research

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Opportunity for a student to do a research project in a specialized area of English or literature under the direction of a member of the English Department faculty.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of both the faculty member directing the research project and the English Department Chair.

3

ENG 497

Senior Thesis

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

A course for students who want to do an extended project.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department Chairperson.

3