English Major and Minor

Stonehill's English Department provides students with a firm grounding in English, American and Anglophone literature and literary history, and fosters effective writing and creative critical thinking.

The English major and minor alike offer a multi-disciplinary approach to literary study that forges connections between texts and contexts, as well as between the literary arts and studies in the humanities.

Our program enjoins students to explore the literary arts as a contact zone where history, critical analysis, theory and creative writing converge.

Explore Literature in All its Forms

Through courses in poetry, fiction, drama, non-fiction, graphic novels, cinema and new media, students examine the world through multiple lenses, navigate a variety of literatures and cultures in English and pursue new ways of seeing received truths.

With two journals of culture and letters, and with a new Creative Writing minor offering courses in poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction and playwriting, the English Department also offers many chances for students to produce literature of their own and share their unique perspectives.

Join a Vibrant Community of Professors & Students

English majors enjoy a vibrant community of rigorous and engaged professors, literary scholars and creative writers. Students can engage in the social and cultural activities organized by the undergraduate English Society and can join in the vigorous life of literary scholarship by participating in the annual Undergraduate Literary Conference that we co-sponsor with Bridgewater State University.

The Department’s focus on student success is reflected in the recent recognition of Professor and Department Chair Jared Green in The Princeton Review’s 2012 edition of The Best 300 Professors, which cites Professor Green’s “intent to encourage students to thirst for intellectual challenge and to love engaging with their world both critically and creatively.”

“The professors not only provided engaging classes, but they also pushed my thinking beyond where I thought it could go. I became more confident in my ideas and much more competent at expressing myself in writing and vocally.”
Sarah Rich ’08 MDiv, Harvard Divinity School

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