Asian Studies Minor Requirements

Program Director:Karen Teoh (Sabbatical Spring 2017) Office: Duffy 243 Phone: 508-565-1277kteoh@stonehill.eduChris Ives (Acting Program Director Spring 2017) Office: Student Union 200 Phone: 505-565-1354cives@stonehill.eduThe minor in Asian Studies requires the completion of six courses selected from the following course groupings, with at least four courses taken from the Asia grouping.

Complete at Least Four Asia Courses

Code Course Credits

ENG 392

Topics in Postcolonial and Global Literature (WID)     (when the focus in on Asia)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An investigation of themes within the frame of postcolonial studies. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website.Fulfills the Writing-in-the Disciplines requirement.

4

HIS 100

Perspectives on China (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall Semester

This course follows in the footsteps of Venetian merchants, Japanese monks, British diplomats, Western missionaries and other foreign visitors to China's shores throughout the centuries. We explore what happens when cultures meet for the first time, how they perceive one another, and how this shapes the writing of history.

Prerequisite(s): HIS 121 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
Considered a World History. When offered as HIS 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as HIS 121, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and History Cornerstone Requirements.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.Course does not count towards Elementary Education licensure.

3 or 4

HIS 100

Made in China: A History of Trade and Culture (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

China is an economic power today, but has also been a vibrant center of global trade and production for centuries. We explore this history from socio-cultural and material perspectives, from the Silk Roads to the Ming voyages, from late twentieth-century labor practices to stereotypes of the "Chinese entrepreneur."

Prerequisite(s): HIS 122 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor. When offered as HIS 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as HIS 122, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and History Cornerstone Requirements.Course does not count towards Elementary Education licensure.

3 or 4

HIS 270

Modern China

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An introduction to the dramatic transformations in China's political, economic and socio-cultural life from the seventeenth century to the present. The course will cover transitions from dynastic to republican to communist rule, encounters with the West, socio-economic reforms, and the challenges of modernization in the world's oldest continuous civilization and bureaucratic state.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Asian Studies minors.

3

HIS 286

Asian American History

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Survey of Asian migration to and experiences in the United States from mid-nineteenth century to the present. Follows East, Southeast and Asian migrants through gold mines and sugar plantations, on the first transcontinental railroad and on agricultural frontiers, through struggles over citizenship and identity politics. Themes include immigration, race relations and multiculturalism in modern United States history.

Considered a United States and World History.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and American Studies programs.

3

HIS 295

History of India

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

This course explores the diverse history of India from paleolithic times to the present. From the earliest known human past in India, we will move into the development of its powerful mythological and religious systems. India's great cities, epic poems, artistic and scientific traditions and spiritual texts will be explored along with the political history of empires, colonialism, independence and modernity.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies program.

3

HIS 329

The Vietnam Era and Its Legacy

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An examination of U.S. policy toward Southeast Asia and the war in Vietnam from the 1940s to the present. The course explores the origins of the U.S. military commitment in Southeast Asia and the ultimate failure of U.S. policy. The effects of the war on veterans and the home front, the peace movement, and the legacy of the war for contemporary U.S. society is also examined.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Asian Studies programs.

3

HIS 373

Asian Empires

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An exploration of imperial expansion by Europeans and Asian powers across the centuries, from the Mongols to the Spanish to the British, from Japan in World War II to present-day notions of a "Greater China." Themes include political, economic, and social legacies of empire.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

HIS 374

Bound Feet and Dragon Ladies: Women & Power in East Asia

Offered: Fall Semester

This course challenges western conceptions of Chinese and Japanese women as unwanted daughters, submissive wives, and exotic geishas. We explore this complex history by studying women's oppression and agency, their evolving socio-political roles, and the construction of gender ideals - male and female - through close examination of popular culture, film, art, and literature.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing and above.
Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Anthropology, Asian Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

LC 342

Learning Community: Yoga, Mindfulness and Indian Philosophy

Offered: Fall Semesters

This Learning community has two parts:

A theoretical component where we study Indian philosophy and its Western adoption. We will study classical Indian philosophy (including but not limited to the Bhagavad Gita and Buddhist scriptures), investigate our Western fascination with 'the mystical East', including the hatha yoga tradition, and examine some of the current research on the benefits of contemplation and on the mindfulness movement. A practicum, where we practice hatha yoga (first hour) and discuss the experience of doing yoga on and off our yoga mats, exploring how you might use mindfulness and yoga as tools to slow down and to center, becoming more aware of your strengths and weaknesses, and better balancing your priorities (second hour).

Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement. This LC may fulfill an elective in Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Asian Studies.

4

PHL 253

Asian Philosophies

Offered: Fall Semester

What is the nature of the self? What is the divine like? How should we live? What happens when we die? In this course, we discuss answers to these and many other questions from some of the rich philosophical traditions outside the Western world.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Philosophy course.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

POL 355

Politics of East Asia

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course provides an introduction to the methods that political scientists use to answer questions. Students will learn analytical tools to critically evaluate and conduct research. The course will cover research design, hypothesis formulation, and various qualitative and quantitative methods for collecting and analyzing data. Students will also construct a research design for a political science topic of interest to them.

Prerequisite(s): POL 143.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

REL 307

Buddhist Ethics

Offered: Spring Semester

An exploration of traditional Buddhist ethics, moral arguments Buddhists have advanced about contemporary issues, and points of comparison with philosophical and Christian ethics.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Religious Studies Cornerstone Course.
Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

REL 323

Gods and War: Religion, Ideology, and Nationalism in Japan and the United States

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

An exploration of how religions in Japan and the United States have helped formulate national identities and mobilize citizens for war.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Religious Studies Cornerstone Course.
Course fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement and may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

REL 373

Buddhism, Nature & Environmental Ethics

Offered: Fall Semester

An exploration of traditional Buddhist views of nature, especially in the Zen tradition, in relation to popular images of Buddhism and recent statements by Buddhist thinkers about environmental issues. Drawing from the field of Environmental Ethics, this course will also consider what a rigorous Buddhist environmental ethic might entail.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Religious Studies Cornerstone Course.
Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

General Courses

Code Course Credits

ANT 105

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology and is designed as an exploration into the diversity of ways in which human beings perceive and order the social world. Topics covered include kinship, gender, language, ecology, economy, political organization, globalization, religion and worldview from a diverse array of cultural viewpoints. Course readings and films include both classic and contemporary ethnographies.

This course was formerly offered as SOC 228 Cultural Anthropology.Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

ANT 233

Language and Culture

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is an overview of linguistic anthropology and sociolinguists, focusing on the relationship between language, culture, and society. Students will explore the nature of human language by studying language in a variety of social contexts with the goal of better understanding how language and culture interact to reflect, maintain, alter, and create the social worlds in which we live.

This course formerly offered as SOC 233 Language and Culture. Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

BUS 336

International Business

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This course introduces the students to the economic, political, and cultural environments affecting international business. In addition, the influence of government on trade, foreign direct investment, foreign exchange, export and import strategies, and the impact of multinational enterprises will be discussed. Students will also be exposed to the comprehensive set of dynamics that comprise international business decision environments and will learn to evaluate alternative courses of action in a global setting. Particular emphasis will be placed on areas of current importance. Extensive use of cases and readings.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies programs. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

4

COM 315

Intercultural Communication

Offered: Fall Semester

Examines the role of communication in the creation and transmission of cultural knowledge and practice. Discusses the impact of communication differences in cross cultural contexts.

Prerequisite(s): COM 105.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor & Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

CRM 355

Global Crime

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2016, 2018

This course provides a foundation for understanding causation, victimization, and control problems of various forms of transnational and international crimes. To understand the context for these crimes the course begins with an introduction to globalization and its effects on society, people, and crime. The second part of the course examines the nature and manifestations of various forms of global crimes ranging from genocide to human trafficking, organized crime, and corporate deviance.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Asian Studies minors.Students registered for this course are eligible to apply for the Learning Inside Out (LION) international internship and professional development program. Please contact Professor Anamika Twyman-Ghoshal for details.

3

ECO 219

History of World Economic Development

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017 and 2019

The world has experienced an extraordinary but unevenly distributed increase in material living standards over the last 250 years. This course examines major developments, issues, and controversies related to long run economic development and change. Themes include the causes of technological leadership, the connection between technological change and business structure, and the spread of industry.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Asian Studies, Anthropology, and Middle Eastern Studies programs. May also be applied to the Latin American Studies programs with permission of the Program Director.

3

ECO 230

Development Economics

Offered: Spring Semester

Why are some countries rich and others poor? What can be done to improve living standards for the billion people living on less than $2 a day? Students will study major questions and theories of economic development, and controversies over appropriate policies and programs. Topics include poverty and inequality, education, health, foreign aid and others. Focus of the course is on empirical examination of these topics with emphasis on the latest evidence from developing countries.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 (or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents) and one Statistical Reasoning Course (ECO 241, BUS 206, CHM 331, CRM 311, EDU 301, MTH 145, MTH 207, MTH 225, MTH 396, PHY 321, POL 210, PSY 261 or SOC 311).
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

ECO 311

International Economics

Offered: Spring Semester

This course covers the major themes of the theory of international trade. The gains from trade, tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade, the theories of international trade such as the theory of absolute and comparative advantage and the Heckscher-Ohlin theory will be studied. The justifications for trade protection, its effects on the economy, historical and contemporary U.S. trade policy and the economics of regional trade agreements will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 (or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents.)
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies programs. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

ECO 343

International Finance

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

Different aspects of the international financial markets, international trade, and balance of payments are studied by using analytical models of an open economy. This course examines the structure and the performance of the foreign exchange market through an extensive use of the Bloomberg technology. Using Bloomberg, students learn the interactions between economic news, global financial markets and exchange rates. Particular emphasis is placed on current issues related to the global financial crisis, international monetary system, the European Union and The European Bank. Other topics include money and financial management for international corporations, interest and commodity arbitrage, spot and forward currency markets. Bloomberg Financial Terminals and Bridge Telerate are used in the course in order to give students a more hands-on knowledge of the international financial markets.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor and Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

ENG 395

Introduction to Postcolonial Literature and Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2016-2017

A critical introduction to the poetry, fiction, and drama of the postcolonial world. Discussions will be informed by an introduction to postcolonial theory.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies program and the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

HIS 271

World History I (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Fall Semester

This course examines the history of humanity from the emergence of our species to the early modern era. Explores how and why humans shifted from nomadic hunting and gathering to settled agriculture societies creating cities, states, and empires. Examines the consequences of this transition for human societies and the environment.

Considered a World History. Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

HIS 272

World History II (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Spring Semester

Examines the history of the human community from the early modern era to the present. Explores how and why industry, nation states, and European style economics have come to define the modern world. It analyzes the interconnections and interdependencies, nowadays called “globalization” that continue to define human historical development.

Considered a World History. Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

POL 143

International Politics

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An exploration of the formation of foreign policy, the structure and processes of international systems, patterns of conflict, economic and security issues, and institutions and processes of conflict resolution.

Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and the Middle Eastern Studies minors

3

POL 234

Comparing States

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

The variations in political systems of states will be explored in terms of state-society relations. Types of democratic and authoritarian systems will be investigated, as well as conditions of their consolidation, change or transformation. In addition, the role of such forces as political protest and participation, ideologies and civil society on shaping politics and policy outcomes will be explored through comparative case studies of countries around the world.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

POL 277

Global Wealth, Power and Poverty

Offered: Fall Semesters

The course examines the global clash and coexistence between states and markets. It explores sources of poverty and inequality in developing world. As a political economy course, it investigates globalization of trade, finance and production. Study of global policy tools to address poverty and promote growth in an increasingly global world concludes the course. An emphasis is placed on the World Bank, the IMF and multinational corporations in world politics and economy.

Prerequisite(s): POL 143.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

POL 353

International Law and Organizations

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2014, 2016

Explores the extent to which international organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank are able to alter the contours of statehood and state sovereignty and whether such international organizations serve or dominate state actors. Case studies are Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Iraq.

Prerequisite(s): POL 143.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors.

3

SOC 202

Sociology of Globalization

Offered: Fall Semester

Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect political, economic, and cultural realms. Important topics include: globalization and the state, global politics, the global economy and inequality, and globalization's homogenizing and diversifying effects.

Course may be applied to the Anthropology, Asian Studies, and Middle Eastern Studies minors.

3

Asian Language Courses at Stonehill

Code Course Credits

CHN 131

Elementary Chinese I

Offered: Fall Semester

An introduction to modern standard Chinese commonly referred to as Mandarin. Focus of the course is on basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills and Pinyin (spelling the sound) system. Students will learn common vocabulary, simple sentence structures and everyday conversational Chinese. Both simplified and traditional character formations will be introduced but the writing will emphasize the simplified form. Chinese culture, customs and history will be incorporated into the course curriculum.

Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

CHN 132

Elementary Chinese II

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is a continuation of CHN 131 - Elementary Chinese I.

Prerequisite(s): CHN 131 or equivalent.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

CHN 231

Intermediate Chinese I

Offered: Fall Semester

In both semesters of the intermediate course, students expand their previous ability in their foreign language and develop the ability to: when speaking, use strings of related sentences; when listening, understand most spoken language when the message is deliberately and carefully conveyed by a speaker accustomed to dealing with learners; when writing, create simple paragraphs; when reading, acquire knowledge and new information from comprehensive authentic text. The course integrates history and culture, as well as contemporary events and issues.

Prerequisite(s): CHN 132 or equivalent.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies program.

3

CHN 232

Intermediate Chinese II

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is a continuation of CHN 231 - Intermediate Chinese I.

Prerequisite(s): CHN 231 or equivalent.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies program.

3

CHN 331

Advanced Chinese I

Offered: Fall Semester

In both semesters of Advanced Chinese, students build upon their previous ability and develop the ability to: speak simple dialogue of paragraph length; understand more authentic speech; write a series of coherent paragraphs; read authentic text to acquire information. The course integrates history and culture, as well as contemporary events and issues.

Prerequisite(s): CHN 232 or equivalent.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies program.

3

CHN 332

Advanced Chinese II

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is a continuation of CHN 331 - Advanced Chinese I.

Prerequisite(s): CHN 331 or equivalent.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies program.

3

CHN 333

Chinese TV Series

Offered: Spring Semester

Study of contemporary Chinese TV Series with an emphasis on conversation, culture and language proficiency. The class will view and discuss TV episodes. Students will study the corresponding scripts, related grammar and vocabulary. Completion of written and oral assignments is also required.

Prerequisite(s): CHN 232 or equivalent.
Course may be applied to the Asian Studies program.

3

Note:

Students may substitute language study, through courses at Stonehill or courses taken elsewhere, but may only use two foreign language courses towards the minor. Appropriate languages include Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Hindi, and Urdu.

Students may petition the Program Director for credit approval for a relevant course not included in the above lists.