Anthropology Minor Requirements

Program Director:Erica Tucker Office: Martin Institute 202 Phone: 508-565-1278etucker@stonehill.edu

The minor in Anthropology requires the completion of six courses.

Complete Two Required Courses

Code Course Credits

ANT 105

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Offered: Fall Semester

This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology and is designed as an exploration into the diversity of ways in which human beings perceive and order the social world. Topics covered include kinship, gender, language, ecology, economy, political organization, globalization, religion and worldview from a diverse array of cultural viewpoints. Course readings and films include both classic and contemporary ethnographies.

This course was formerly offered as SOC 228 Cultural Anthropology.Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement. Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

SOC 312

Qualitative Research

Offered: Spring Semester

An in-depth exploration of qualitative research practices in sociology. Students will study theoretical and methodological aspects of qualitative research and engage in hands-on projects utilizing the following methods: oral history interview, or in-depth interview, and ethnography.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and SOC 210.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

Complete at least One Regionally-Based Culture Area Course

Code Course Credits

ANT 316

People & Cultures of Russia & East Europe

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Students will explore the culture of contemporary Russia and East Europe from an anthropological perspective using ethnographic research to explore how the socialist past continues to shape contemporary society in the region.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 105 or SOC 101.
This course was formerly offered as SOC 316 People & Cultures of Russia & East Europe.

3

FRN 333

French Culture and Civilization I

Offered: Fall Semester

Study of contemporary French culture and its recent history, social issues, economy, attitudes and institutions.

Prerequisite(s): (Recommended 4 years of high school French) FRN 332 or higher.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor

3

ITA 251

Italy: Language and Identity

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

For students who continue to study Italian after ITA 232 or who are placed at the upper intermediate level. ITA 251 is designed to refine and apply language skills in writing, speaking, reading and listening beyond the Intermediate level. Topics on regional and national identity serve as a context for language acquisition and grammar review. Students investigate what constitutes the Italian identity through the study of authentic texts and Internet resources. Class projects involve individual research about the history, art and popular culture of contemporary Italy.

Prerequisite(s): Placement at the upper intermediate level.
This course counts towards the minor in Italian Studies and may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

REL 318

Archaeology and Religion in Ancient Greece

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course introduces the field of archeology in the Greek world and demonstrate how archaeological remains can enlighten our understanding of Greek religion and society. The course will then examine how material evidence can help us to better understand this complex ancient culture and the world in which it developed.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Religious Studies Cornerstone Course.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 216

Native Americans in the 21st Century

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course analyzes the interactions between Native Americans and non-Natives. It looks critically at meanings of tribal sovereignty and the changing dynamics of international relations. Federal and state policies related to land, constitutional governments, crime and law enforcement, tribal recognition, sacred cultural artifacts, and economic development are assessed.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SPA 345

Seminar in Spanish: Afro-Hispanic Culture of the Caribbean

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Study of a specific literary movement, author, or genre.

Prerequisite(s): SPA 332 or higher.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs.

3

SPA 346

Seminar in Spanish: Maya, Aztec, and Inca Traditions

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Study of a specific literary movement, author, or genre.

Prerequisite(s): SPA 332 or higher.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs.

3

Complete at least One Ethnographic Topical Course

Code Course Credits

ANT 200

Foundations of Archeology

Offered: Spring Semester

Archaeology is the study of the human past through the remains of their material culture. Archaeologists study artifacts, sites, settlements, and landscapes to gain an understanding of how humans lived in the distant and recent past. Students will gain an understanding of the principles, methods, and theories of archaeological research, while exploring the history of the field and case studies.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year and Sophomore students. Other students with instructor permission.
This course was formerly offered as SOC 115 Introduction to Archeology.Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

3

ANT 230

Families in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course examines concepts of marriage and family as social institutions from a cross-cultural perspective. Drawing on both classic and contemporary essays as well as in-depth ethnographic studies of families, we will examine the ways in which intimate relationships are created, understood, and enacted around the globe.

This course was formerly SOC 230 Families in Cross-Cultural Perspectives.Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

ANT 233

Language and Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course is an overview of linguistic anthropology and sociolinguists, focusing on the relationship between language, culture, and society. Students will explore the nature of human language by studying language in a variety of social contexts with the goal of better understanding how language and culture interact to reflect, maintain, alter, and create the social worlds in which we live.

This course formerly offered as SOC 233 Language and Culture. Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors. Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

3

ANT 304

Museum Studies

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

A survey of museology, this course introduces students to the history of museums and debates about their role in society. Students will visit and read case studies of ethnographic, history, and art museums among others to explore the relationships between exhibits, museum missions, those they represent, and the communities in which they reside.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 or ANT 105.
This course was formerly offered as SOC 304 Introduction to Museum Studies.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ANT 329

Anthropology of Violence

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

War, political and economic oppression, sectarian strife, poverty and disease are pervasive in the world today, ravaging the lives of ever-growing numbers of people. Using a cross-cultural approach, we will explore the impact of violence on society, its cultural legacies, and examples of building peace.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 or ANT 105.
This course was formerly offered as SOC 329 Anthropology of Violence.

3

ANT 334

Anthropology of the Holocaust

Offered: Fall Semester

In recent decades social scientists have increasingly turned their attention to the Holocaust. The goal of this class is to examine these studies in order to better understand the events, their causes, and their legacies from a range of perspectives: victims, perpetrators, witnesses, and rescuers.

3

SOC 202

Sociology of Globalization

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect political, economic, and cultural realms. Important topics include: globalization and the state, global politics, the global economy and inequality, and globalization's homogenizing and diversifying effects.

Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor. Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

SOC 220

Political Sociology

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This class is a sociological review and analysis of political structure and power. The course will critically analyze: state structures, political parties, power, legitimacy, civil society, and the welfare state.

Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 234

Racial and Ethnic Diversity

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course is an introduction to the study of race and ethnicity in America. Beginning with the social construction of race we explore how the categorization of individuals and groups has changed and continue to create and limit opportunities and rights. Drawing from critical race theory and research from scholars and activists across disciplines this course also looks at the intersectionality of race and ethnicity with other categories of difference.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 237

Sociology of Gender

Offered: Spring Semester

Course will distinguish between sex and gender and critically examine how social historical meanings about femininity and masculinity are socially constructed, reinforced, and challenged. Considers how gender differences and gender inequality play out in a variety of institutions including education, the economy, the family, politics, religion, the media and medicine. Critical perspectives, including feminist and multi-cultural approaches, will be employed.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor. Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

SOC 405

Seminar on Public Sociologies

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Public sociology-sociological research that emerges from dialogues with publics-is both one of the oldest and newest topics within the discipline. This course will examine how sociologists can connect with publics, explore methodologies and concepts, study global public sociologies, and identify ways to promote public sociology.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional Sociology course.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 421

Seminar: Oppression

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This seminar takes a critical look at the rights of the individual within the family, community, state and nation. Beginning with The Universal Declaration of Human Rights we investigate the violation of human rights globally and in America. Texts include examples of the denial of human rights...to victims of sex trafficking, to those who suffer from mental illness, to children and youth at risk, to immigrants seeking shelter, safety and opportunities in America.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional SOC course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

Complete Two Additional Courses

Take an additional course from either of the two lists above, or from the following list of courses taught in a variety of departments that are informed by anthropological theory and/or ethnographic or archaeological research.

Code Course Credits

ANT 350

Topics in Anthropology     (if not counting above)

Offered: Offered Periodically

Examines a topic of current interest in the public sphere from an anthropological perspective. The content and format of the course will be tailored to the topic area.

3

ANT 497

Anthropology Senior Thesis

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Fourth-year students will polish their communication skills and build on prior coursework in the development of a thesis. The goal is preparation of a paper suitable for presentation at an annual meeting of a professional association or a writing sample for graduate school.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 105 or SOC 228, SOC 312 Permission of the Instructor and Program Director.

3

ECO 219

History of World Economic Development

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2017 and 2019

The world has experienced an extraordinary but unevenly distributed increase in material living standards over the last 250 years. This course examines major developments, issues, and controversies related to long run economic development and change. Themes include the causes of technological leadership, the connection between technological change and business structure, and the spread of industry.

Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs with permission of the Program Directors.

3

HIS 209

Native American History

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

An interdisciplinary survey of the aboriginal inhabitants of North America from pre-history to the present. Confronts long-standing stereotypes of Native Americans and seeks a deeper understanding of native beliefs, values, and historical experiences. Course deals extensively with European and Native American encounters and evaluates their continuing impact on indigenous communities.

Considered a United States or World History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and the Anthropology minor.

3

HIS 244

Colonial Latin America

Offered: Spring Semester

This course is a survey of the historical, economic, political, social, and cultural development of colonial Latin America from before the European discovery to the era of independence. It addresses the major themes and substance of the three centuries of colonial government and an appreciation for the complexity and diversity of colonial Latin America.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs.

3

HIS 257

Modern Latin America

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course seeks to locate Modern Latin America (c. 1800-present) within a global framework and to understand the origins and development of the political, economic, social, and cultural issues that challenge and define Latin America today, including US foreign policy and changing ethnic, gender, and class relations.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs.

3

HIS 270

Modern China

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

An introduction to the dramatic transformations in China's political, economic and socio-cultural life from the seventeenth century to the present. The course will cover transitions from dynastic to republican to communist rule, encounters with the West, socio-economic reforms, and the challenges of modernization in the world's oldest continuous civilization and bureaucratic state.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

HIS 277

History of Brazil

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course examines the history of Brazil from 1500 to the present and explores its richly diverse culture, politics, economy, and geography that ultimately tie it to the histories of Europe, Africa, Asia, the U.S. Major themes include: race relations, national development, military dictatorships, and popular culture.

Considered a World History. Course may be applied to the Anthropology and Latin American Studies programs.

3

HIS 278

History of the Islamic World I

Offered: Fall Semester

This course explores the historical development of Islamic societies from the pre-Islamic period to roughly 1500 CE. We will develop a nuanced understanding of cultural, intellectual, spiritual, political and economic themes important to the formation of classical Islamic civilization, through studying primary texts in translation, visual arts and contemporary scholarship.

Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies and Anthropology minors.Considered a World History.

3

HIS 279

Modern Japan

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

From shogun to skinkansen - a survey of Japan from the seventeenth century to the present, examining the political, social and economic changes that accompanied its transformation from feudal shogunate to modern nation-state. Topics covered include the Meiji Revolution, modernization, the rise of nationalism, and Japan's relations with Western and Asian powers.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Anthropology minors.

3

HIS 283

East Asian History I

Offered: Spring Semester

A broad survey of major developments in East Asian history from the time of its earliest written records (circa 1200 B.C.E.) to 1800 C.E. Draws on primary sources, secondary scholarship, and examples of material culture to highlight key themes in the political, social and cultural life in China, Japan and Korea. These themes include state formation and dissolution, religious beliefs, political ideologies, philosophy and literature, economic activities and social relations.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

HIS 284

East Asian History II

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

An introduction to the turbulent histories of modern China, Japan and Korea, covering their major political, economic and socio-cultural transformations from 1800 onwards. Themes considered include encounters with Western military and economic expansion, the role of cultural exchanges in Asia, and the rapidly growing role of East Asia in present-day globalization.

Considered a World History.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Anthropology minors.

3

HIS 290

History of the Islamic World II

Offered: Spring Semester

This course explores the historical development of Muslim societies from roughly 1500 CE to the present. We will develop a nuanced understanding of cultural, intellectual, spiritual, political and economic themes important to the contemporary Muslim world in its global context, through studying primary texts in translation, visual arts and contemporary scholarship.

Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies and Anthropology minors.Considered a World History.

3

HIS 374

Bound Feet and Dragon Ladies: Women & Power in East Asia

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

This course challenges western conceptions of Chinese and Japanese women as unwanted daughters, submissive wives, and exotic geishas. We explore this complex history by studying women's oppression and agency, their evolving socio-political roles, and the construction of gender ideals - male and female - through close examination of popular culture, film, art, and literature.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing and above.
Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

REL 275

Hard Rockin' Jews: Judaism and Pop Culture in Israel

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

For 2000 years Judaism has been a minority religion in majority "other" cultures. With the establishment of Israel, Judaism became the majority culture of a nation-state. This course examine how the religion of Judaism both influences and is influenced by the secular culture of the modern State of Israel.

Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Religious Studies Cornerstone Course.
Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.

3

REL 312

Archaeology and the Bible

Offered: Not Offered 2015-2016

Introduction to the archaeology of Palestine, with special focus on the interrelationship of excavated and textual data.

Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies and Anthropology minors.

3

Note for Sociology Majors

Please note that Anthropology Minors who are Sociology Majors must take five classes in addition to the 10 that count towards their sociology major, and must take at least two of their electives for the Anthropology Minor from outside the Sociology Department.