American Studies, B.A. Requirements

Major

To complete a major in American Studies, students must take 11 courses. At least five courses must be taken after the student has either declared an American Studies major or taken the Introduction to American Studies course.

The major’s two required courses AMS 200 Introduction to American Studies (usually taken during Freshman or Sophomore year) and AMS 420 Seminar in American Studies (taken Junior or Senior year) provide students with an understanding of interdisciplinary methodology at the onset of their career in the major, and the opportunity to apply this methodology to their own research interests.

Of the other nine courses in the major, four are elective courses (100-300 level) from an approved list. No more than two 100-Level courses can count for the major. Students are particularly encouraged to complete an internship, practicum or independent project (such as the S.U.R.E. program) which will provide opportunities for collaborative learning, field research and public/ community service. Students may not count more than two internships or independent studies towards their major requirements.

The other five required courses form the student’s concentration. All majors with the help of the American Studies advisor will develop a specialized concentration. The concentration, made up of five courses in at least two different disciplines, will define a coherent area of specialization within the major by focusing on a particular problem, topic, or area of American society and culture. Students may chose from suggested concentrations including difference and diversity, popular culture, representations, material culture and cultural politics, or propose a student-designed thematic concentration. Successful focus areas might include a collection of courses around a specific time period, such as the 1960s or a particular issue, such as Education, Race and Class in Modern America. As part of their concentration proposals, students may petition that courses not presently listed as American Studies courses be approved for the major concentration. To be eligible for concentration credit, courses must be recommended by the advisor and approved by the American Studies Steering Committee. Students must select from the following courses:

American Studies

Code Course Credits

AMS 110

Women Reimagining History (LIT Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

In this course we will look at how women and in particular women of color writers and filmmakers have challenged and complicated our understanding of U.S. history, culture, and politics in the 20th century. In the context of immigration, slavery, and the lives of Native Americans, we will analyze what these stories of self and community tell us about how important race and gender are to our understanding of the past. Likely texts/films include: Maxine Hong Kingston's Woman Warrior, Toni Morrison's Beloved, Louise Erdrich's Tracks, Lourdes Portillo's Señorita Extraviada (film), and Ursula Biemann's Performing the Border (film).

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year students only.
Fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Cornerstone Literature Requirements.Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

4

AMS 200

Introduction to American Studies

Offered: Fall Semester

Introduction to the study of America from an interdisciplinary perspective, emphasizing critical analysis of culture though exploration of a wide range of cultural artifacts including literary and historical texts, visual images and material objects. Students will examine the many aspects of thought, expression, and behavior that have shaped and defined the complex society of the United States while exploring their own relationship to America’s diverse history and culture. Of particular concern are the diverse cultural experiences and meaning that shape individual and collective notions of American identity.

3

AMS 320

Topics in American Studies

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Offers the opportunity to study a specific issue or topic in American Studies in greater depth. Seminar format focuses on classroom discussions and research. Topic will be announced prior to registration. May be taken more than once.

3

AMS 420

Seminar in American Studies

Offered: Spring Semester

Provides research tools, strategies, and guidance for the elaboration of a significant research project in an area of American cultural studies with emphasis on the collaborative selection and research of issues for discussion as well as on sharing the process of project development. The specific content of this course varies with the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): Junior Standing

3

AMS 475

Internship in American Studies

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Practical experience in a local organization such as a government office, museum, arts agency, or social action group. Allows students to translate American Studies theory and method into professional skills and opportunities.

Must complete the "U.S. Internship Request for Approval" process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship.

3

AMS 490

Directed Study

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An in-depth interdisciplinary study of a question under the tutorial direction of a faculty member.

3

Communication

Code Course Credits

COM 203

Studies in Persuasion

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Analysis of social aspects of persuasion, cultural basis for belief and theories of attitude change. Examination of reasoning and rhetoric in advertising, political campaigns, and social movements.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

COM 207

Media Criticism

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Survey of internal and external constraints in production of mediated messages. Analysis of news, advertising, and entertainment processes and products.

Prerequisite(s): COM 107.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

COM 220

Understanding Film

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduction to film analysis through the study of a variety of film texts, with an emphasis on film form, and how the various components of filmmaking, including elements of mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound and music, and narrative structure function within that system.

Course may be applied to the American Studies & Cinema Studies program.

3

COM 313

Gender and Communication

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Examines the impact of gender, or male-female perspectives, on the communication process. Topics discussed within a variety of contexts.

Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

COM 318

Persuasion and Social Movements

Offered: Spring Semester

Role of discourse in the life cycle of social movements. Rhetorical analysis of stages of movement development. Examination of theory and research.

Prerequisite(s): COM 203.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

COM 319

Political Communication

Offered: Alternate Years Fall 2014, 2016

Examines nature and impact of diverse communication strategies in political contexts, such as congressional and presidential campaigns and legislative discussion of social issues.

Prerequisite(s): COM 203.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

COM 323

Topics in Film

Offered: Spring Semester

The topics of this seminar vary, but include a critical analysis of film-related subject matter.

Course may be taken twice, but Communication students may only count one toward the major or minor.Course may be applied to the American Studies program & Cinema Studies minor.

3

Criminology

Code Course Credits

CRM 224

Juvenile Delinquency

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

An examination of juvenile delinquency in American society. Topics included are the historical background and "invention" of delinquency, cross-cultural definitions of delinquency, theories of delinquency, social class differences, and the juvenile court system. The course critically examines the social, health, and mental health services which have been utilized by this society in attempts to prevent or "treat" delinquent behavior.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 and CRM 201.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

CRM 322

Violent Crime and Federal Initiatives

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course examines current patterns of violent crime in the US, such as gang violence and spousal abuse, and the role of federal criminal justice agencies in designing and implementing agency partnership models to reduce crime in local communities.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 120 or CRM 201.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

CRM 430

Seminar: Race, Class and Gender in the Criminal Justice System

Offered: Offered Periodically

A comparative examination of women and minorities in the criminal justice system. Topics include: women and minority offenders; women and minority victims; women and minorities at different stages of the criminal justice process (police, courts, and corrections); women and minorities employed within the system; and societal attitudes toward women and minorities involved in the system.

Prerequisite(s): CRM 201 and one additional CRM course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

Economics

Code Course Credits

ECO 205

Economics of Social Issues and Public Policy

Offered: Fall Semester

Economic analysis of issues often neglected in traditional economics courses, emphasizing policies that may alleviate social problems. Topics include healthcare, education, crime, substance abuse, cigarette smoking, gambling, housing, and family issues.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 or the First-Year Seminar equivalent.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ECO 206

United States Economic History

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall Semester 2015, 2017

Basic economic analysis is used to study important aspects of the economic history of the United States. Concentration is on the period from 1830 to 1945, when the U.S. became a major industrial power. Emphasized are the development of big business, the effect of race and gender on markets, opportunities and incomes, and government policy.

Not open to first semester students.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ECO 211

Economics of Labor Unions

Offered: Spring Semester (Not Offered 2014-2015)

Examines the historical and current role of organized labor in the U.S. and its impact on employment, wages, prices, and trade. Additional topics include collective bargaining, labor market discrimination, and the globalization of production.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ECO 217

Economic History of the 20th Century American Family

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

The course traces the socioeconomic progress of a variety of American families over the century. Changes in real income, employment conditions, labor force participation, education, residence, and family life are examined within the context of larger economic, political, and social events such as immigration, war, depression, the labor movement, civil rights, and women's rights.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ECO 244

The Economics of Sports

Offered: Spring Semester

The course analyzes the industry of sports, particularly professional and big-time college sports, using and developing tools of economic analysis, mainly microeconomics. Topics include the salary structure of professional team sports and the effects of free agency; the factors affecting sports attendance; the value of sports programming to broadcasters and the effect of television revenue; issues in college sports like conference realignment, television contracts, and eligibility rules; the economic effects of professional sports franchises and stadia; and factors affecting competitive balance.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 (or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents) and completion of any Statistical Reasoning course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ECO 305

Public Sector Economics

Offered: Fall Semester

Theoretical and empirical microeconomic analysis of government policy with respect to the efficient allocation of resources and the equitable distribution of income. Learn how appropriately chosen government policy enhances (rather than hinders) efficiency and equity in our society.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 (or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents.)
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ECO 309

Money and Banking

Offered: Fall Semester

Analysis of the operation of financial markets and financial institutions focusing on financial intermediaries including commercial banks, investment banks and the central bank. Examines the structure and performance of the bond and stock markets, derivatives, and other financial instruments. Extensive use current market information prepares students with the real-world knowledge and experience necessary for careers in the financial world.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 (or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents.)
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ECO 319

Urban and Regional Economics

Offered: Spring Semester

Economic analysis of urban and regional dynamics, especially changing population and business location factors. Examines the problems of modern cities, e.g., housing, transportation, education, crime, and the cost of providing municipal services.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 or First-Year Seminar equivalent.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ECO 323

Labor Economics and Manpower Policy

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

Economic analysis of labor markets, supply and demand considerations, labor force participation, wage determination models, discrimination theories, unemployment, manpower planning programs, and other public policies.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 176 and ECO 178 (or their corresponding First-Year Seminar equivalents.)
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

Education

Code Course Credits

EDU 208

Planning for Multicultural Learning

Offered: Fall Semester

Defines concerns regarding human diversity as they relate to the education process. Engages students in a personal and group process toward understanding differences. Extends student awareness for the variety, richness, and contrasts in cultures as a basis for appreciating the force of culture in identity, behavior, belief, and attitude. Develops ability to perceive and analyze the sources and consequences of prejudice, discrimination, and racism. Relates all the above to teaching concerns. Emphasizes students’ choice of material for reflection and examination.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

English

Code Course Credits

ENG 272

Film History

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

A survey of major film industries and canonical texts presented in a chronological order serving specific themes (for example, film-making in a given geographical region).

Course may be applied to the American Studies program and Cinema Studies minor.

3

ENG 273

Hitchcock

Offered: Fall Semester

A survey of Alfred Hitchcock's work and obsessions. This course welcomes students with no prior experience in the study of film. Additional screening time required.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program and Cinema Studies minor.

3

ENG 300

Critical Theory

Offered: Spring Semester

Introduction to contemporary theory - its origin and framework - by examining literary criticism as an institutional discourse.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.
Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

ENG 324

Topics in Television Studies

Offered: Offered Periodically

An examination of specific topics related to television genres or periods through application of contemporary critical theories.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website at www.stonehill.edu/offices-services/registrar/course-listings.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and Cinema Studies minor.

3

ENG 326

Topics in American Cinema

Offered: Fall Semester

A critical study of specific topics related to the American narrative film.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website at www.stonehill.edu/offices-services/registrar/course-listings.Course may be applied to the American Studies program, Gender & Sexuality Studies program and the Cinema Studies minor.

3

ENG 360

American Literature to 1865

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

A chronological survey of texts, figures, and influences associated with American literature of the period.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 362

Topics in Poetry

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

A critical reading of poetry. Topics vary from semester to semester.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website at www.stonehill.edu/offices-services/registrar/course-listings.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 366

Topics in Twentieth-Century American Literature

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

An examination of themes in twentieth-century literature. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website at www.stonehill.edu/offices-services/registrar/course-listings.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 367

Topics in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Offered: Fall Semester

An examination of themes in nineteenth-century literature. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Specific topics and descriptions offered in a given semester can be found on the Registrar's website at www.stonehill.edu/offices-services/registrar/course-listings.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 368

Race, Ethnicity, and American Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

An exploration of the relationship between American racial and ethnic politics and twentieth-century American culture.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 369

African-American Literature

Offered: Spring Semester

An exploration of landmarks in African-American writing from the time of slavery to the contemporary period.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 380

Modern Poetry

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

A critical analysis of issues of voice, persona, and genre in modern and contemporary poetry.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 382

American Drama

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

A study of specific topics related to North American plays of the twentieth century.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

ENG 394

Sexuality and Textuality

Offered: Fall Semester

A critical examination of the definitions of sexual orientation found in diverse texts.

Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

Healthcare Administration

Code Course Credits

HCA 220

Healthcare Policy and Politics

Offered: Fall Semester

Historical development of the nation's system of healthcare. Review of healthcare policy development and implementation at the local, state, and federal levels; major healthcare and related social issues and concerns are addressed in both readings and class discussions.

3

History

Code Course Credits

HIS 100

Becoming Modern: America in the 1920s (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Celebrated in the popular imagination as the age where "anything goes," America in the 1920s witnessed modernizing and traditional forces clash over such issues as immigration, prohibition, radicalism, consumerism and changing moral standards. This course explores the cultural ferment of the time, examining how the forces of modernity and traditionalism made the Twenties both liberating and repressive.

Prerequisite(s): HIS 110 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
Considered a United States History. When offered as HIS 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as HIS 110, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and History Cornerstone Requirements. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.Course does not count towards Elementary Education licensure.

3 or 4

HIS 100

Heretics, Reformers and Radicals: Women & Power in American History (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course focuses on women who challenged the gendered hierarchies of their eras. We will examine a collection of women from the 17th to the 20th centuries who developed new modes of exercising power in American public life and overturned longstanding ideas about the weakness and subordination of women.

Prerequisite(s): HIS 112 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
Considered a United States History. When offered as HIS 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as HIS 112, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and History Cornerstone Requirements.Course may be applied to the American Studies & Gender & Sexuality Studies program.Course does not count towards Elementary Education licensure.

3 or 4

HIS 100

The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Frederick Douglass' heroic journey from slavery to freedom in antebellum America illuminates--in lightning flashes--a nation riven by race, region, economy and differing conceptions of justice and morality. The course weaves literature, film, and primary materials, tracing Douglass's complex life and times and introducing students to college-level historical inquiry.

Prerequisite(s): HIS 128 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
Considered a United States History. When offered as HIS 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement. When offered as HIS 128, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and History Cornerstone Requirements.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.Course does not count towards Elementary Education licensure.

3 or 4

HIS 205

Irish-American Experience

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Irish background, different waves of Irish immigration, Irish contributions to politics, religion, business and fine arts, as well as the different interpretations of the Irish experience in America.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and the Irish Studies minor.

3

HIS 209

Native American History

Offered: Spring Semester

An interdisciplinary survey of the aboriginal inhabitants of North America from pre-history to the present. Confronts long-standing stereotypes of Native Americans and seeks a deeper understanding of native beliefs, values, and historical experiences. Course deals extensively with European and Native American encounters and evaluates their continuing impact on indigenous communities.

Considered a United States or World History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and the Anthropology minor.

3

HIS 225

History and Film

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

For years, Hollywood has offered an array of films, both epic and provincial, that center upon events in history. Using primary and secondary written accounts, this course will view a comparative selection of these films in the search for “historical” truth.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States and European History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 228

History of U.S. Foreign Relations

Offered: Spring Semester

In this survey of American foreign relations from the late eighteenth century to the recent past, we will explore significant trends and changes to explain the movement of the United States from a fledgling nation, to regional power, to global empire, and, finally, to declining superpower.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 233

American Catholic Social History

Offered: Fall Semester

An historical presentation of the numerous social issues, conflicts, and varied solutions in American Catholicism from the late 19th century forward with emphasis on how the many issues of society impacted Catholicism. The course demonstrates how the application of faith and various theological and philosophical theories were used in resolution of social conflict.

Considered a United States History. Fulfills the Moral Inquiry and Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 263

Religion in America

Offered: Fall Semester

An examination of a variety of religious ideas, institutions, and traditions in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis is placed upon questions of religious pluralism, religion and cultural identity, and religion in public life.

Considered a United States History.Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions Requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 281

American Nation I (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Fall Semester

Comprehensive study of American historical development with a focus on the development of U.S. political principles, ideals, founding documents, institutions, and processes. Topics include modes of colonial life, geographical perspectives, the Revolution and Constitution, urban development, westward movement, constructions of race and gender, popular culture, the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Considered a United States History. Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 282

American Nation II (History Cornerstone)

Offered: Spring Semester

An analysis and interpretation of the development of American politics, foreign policy, and domestic society from Reconstruction to the present. Topics include the gilded society, world power, the rise of consumer culture, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, affluence and discontent.

Considered a United States History. Fulfills the History Cornerstone Requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program and the Asian Studies minor.

3

HIS 285

Women in America: 1630-1865

Offered: Spring Semester

The history of women from the colonial era through the end of the nineteenth century. Examines the diversity of experiences among women of different races and classes in America, focusing on issues central to female experience: reproduction and family life, work, religion and reform, and political struggles for civil rights.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

HIS 286

Asian American History

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

Survey of Asian migration to and experiences in the United States from mid-nineteenth century to the present. Follows East, Southeast and Asian migrants through gold mines and sugar plantations, on the first transcontinental railroad and on agricultural frontiers, through struggles over citizenship and identity politics. Themes include immigration, race relations and multiculturalism in modern United States history.

Considered a United States and World History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 287

Women in Modern America: 1865-1975

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Survey course of U.S. Women's History from Reconstruction to 1975. Examines a diverse array of women's lives and experiences including women's rights activists, African-Americans, Native Americans and Immigrants. Topics will include civil rights, women in war, education, reform, marriage, family and reproduction, labor, consumer and popular culture.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

HIS 301

Colonial America

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

This course examines the social consequences of colonization, migration and war in early America, 1500-1775. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of regional cultures, and the interaction of British colonies with competing European cultures (French, Spanish, Dutch), with Native Americans, and with African-American slaves.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 303

From Depression to Dominance

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

This course studies the political, social, and economic life of the United States from the Great Depression to 1960. Students will explore the New Deal, World War II, the origins of the Cold War, the growth of new media, and major changes in class, gender, and race relations.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 304

U.S. Popular Culture

Offered: Fall Semester

An investigation of U.S. popular culture focusing on its ability to illuminate important themes in the nation's social, economic, and political development. A special emphasis will be given to twentieth-century popular culture. Important questions and themes will include popular culture's role in perpetuating attitudes regarding race and gender.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

HIS 305

U.S. Popular Music

Offered: Spring Semester

In a seminar format, this course will analyze how American popular music reflected and shaped public notions about class, gender, and race. Topics will include jazz, rap, rock and roll, rhythm and blues, country, and folk music.

Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

HIS 307

From the New Frontier to a New Century

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

This course studies the political, social, and economic life of the United States from 1960 to the present. Students will explore the burst of political activism during the 1960s and 1970s, Watergate, the Reagan era, and other historically significant individuals, events, and programs of the last decades of the twentieth century and the early decades of the twenty first century.

Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 308

The Early Republic

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Explores the tumultuous years following the American Revolution when Americans fought over the meaning of the war and the future direction of the country. We will examine the major conflicts of the period, including ratification of the Constitution, slavery, reform movements, Indian removal, immigration and capitalist development.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 321

African-American History I

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

This course explores African-American history and culture from the beginnings of slavery in America to the Civil War. Themes include ethnic origins in West Africa, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the emergence of plantations societies in the Americas, slave resistance, the abolition movement, gender, Civil War and emancipation.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 324

From Jackson to Lincoln

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Examination of the major political, social, and economic developments in U.S. Society from the election of Andrew Jackson to the presidency in 1828, to that of Abraham Lincoln in 1860.

Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 325

Lincoln and His America

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

An examination of the life and times of Abraham Lincoln, one of the most important and frequently studied figures in U.S. history. The course is conducted as a seminar, and readings include Lincoln's own speeches and writings as well as scholarly studies of his life and career.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 327

American Civil War and Reconstruction

Offered: Fall Semester

Examines the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction in U.S. history (1860 - 1880), including the war's origins and consequences. The course explores, in addition to the military aspects of the war, the major political, social, and economic development of the period.

Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 328

Pursuits of Happiness in Revolutionary America

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course traces the events and conditions that led North American colonists to pursue life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness through political conflict, revolution, and war. We will examine the breakup of empire in North America and consider how ordinary men and women, African-Americans, and Native Americans responded to and shaped revolutionary events.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 329

The Vietnam Era and Its Legacy

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

An examination of U.S. policy toward Southeast Asia and the war in Vietnam from the 1940s to the present. The course explores the origins of the U.S. military commitment in Southeast Asia and the ultimate failure of U.S. policy. The effects of the war on veterans and the home front, the peace movement, and the legacy of the war for contemporary U.S. society is also examined.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.Course may be applied to the Asian Studies minor.

3

HIS 330

United States Seminar: Topical

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Offers an opportunity to study a specific area or problem in U.S. history in greater depth. Seminar format focusing on discussion of primary sources and secondary literature. Alternating topics to be announced prior to registration.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies and Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

HIS 332

America in the Nuclear Age

Offered: Fall Semester

This course explores the origins and evolution of the nuclear age, both at home and abroad, looking at politics, diplomacy, as well as cultural and social trends. Students will also examine the continuing presence of nuclear weapons as cultural symbols and threats to world peace despite the end of the Cold War.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 335

The Debate Over Slavery in Antebellum America

Offered: Fall Semester

An examination of writing and speeches attacking and defending slavery in the United States between the American Revolution and the Civil War.

Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.
Considered a United States History. Fulfills the Moral Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 337

The Electric Guitar in American Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

This course explores the electric guitar as instrument, symbol, and artifact in modern American culture. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, we will assess the impact of the electric guitar on various kinds of music, from blues to heavy metal, and dig into the lives of the musicians and manufacturers who gave the electric guitar its iconic power.

Considered a United States History.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.Course formerlly offered as AMS 333.

3

HIS 380

Public History

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This academic and experiential course looks at the practice, methods, and possibilities associated with practicing history in museums, historic sites, and archives. In the classroom, we will explore the nature of public history through curatorial, archival, and preservation issues, as well as examine the roles of education, interpretation, exhibitions, and living history. A substantial field component has students encountering museums, archives, and historic sites to interact with professionals, discover what public historians do, and critically assess their public history offerings. As a final project, students will collaboratively produce a museum exhibition at Stonehill.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

HIS 385

Topics in U.S. Women’s History

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course moves beyond a broad overview of the role of women in eighteenth and nineteenth century U.S. History to examine specific topics such as education, reform, labor, culture, and political organization in depth.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
Considered a United States History. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

Journalism

Code Course Credits

JRN 222

Development of American News Media

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course traces the development of the news media, print, and broadcast, from their beginning stages in the 1830s to the present. The economic, cultural, political, and social dimensions of this process are explored.

3

Political Science

Code Course Credits

POL 235

American Political Thought

Offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2016

An exploration of the basic structure, values, and theoretical foundations of the American republic and its political development. The creation and definition of American political thinking in the works of Locke, Jefferson, Madison, Tocqueville, Calhoun, Lincoln, and others.

Prerequisite(s): POL 171 or POL 110 or a 100-Level Philosophy Course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 245

American Foreign Policy

Offered: Fall Semester

The interplay between American interests and the international political system is examined in terms of decision-making, political pressures, ethical considerations, a changing security agenda, patterns of cooperation and conflict, trade and aid, human rights and resource distribution.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 247

Elections in America

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2014

Elections are the signature events of American democracy and provide a mechanism to ensure democratic accountability. This course examines how elections in America are structured and how political parties shape the electoral system. The course also examines how interest groups, the media, and money impact electoral dynamics.

Prerequisite(s): POL 123.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 255

Environmental Policy and Politics

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2014

Global climate change, mass extinctions, polluted waterways, hazardous waste dumps, oil spills, and nuclear meltdowns. Concerns about the health and integrity of the environment have garnered much attention since the 1960s. This course examines the nature and extent of public policy-making that addresses these and other environmental issues.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 332

The American Presidency

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2014, 2016

The origins and growth of the American presidency, the Executive office, and its occupant, the relationship between the office and democratic government, the separation of powers and divided party government, and on the expansion of public administration during the twentieth century.

Prerequisite(s): POL 123.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 336

Constitutional Law and Politics

Offered: Fall Semester

This course focuses on the structural form and institutional powers of American government. The central purpose of the course is to explore the question of constitutional interpretation. Who are the authoritative interpreters of the Constitution, what is the relationship between them, and what interpretive methodology should they employ?

Prerequisite(s): POL 123.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 337

Public Administration

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2014

Administration of public affairs; how public policy is put into effect by government bureaucracies; theories of government organizations; the political setting of bureaucracies; problems of budgeting and personnel; efficient and humane conduct of public business.

Prerequisite(s): POL 123.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 341

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

The primary goal of this course is to provide a broad understanding of the civil liberties and civil rights enjoyed by persons in the United States. The course explores the historical evolution of rights and liberties and their application to current controversies. The course covers freedom of religion, freedom of speech, the right to privacy, freedom from cruel and unusual punishments, protections against discrimination, and affirmative action.

Prerequisite(s): POL 123.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 346

Immigration and the American Ideal

Offered: Spring Semester

This course will consider the topic of immigration from a human rights perspective, particularly following the events of 9/11. After offering students a brief overview of U.S. immigration law and those responsible for implementing it, classes will examine issues of migrants, immigration reform, deportation, and the role of state and federal authorities.

Prerequisite(s): POL 123
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 358

Massachusetts State Politics

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2014, 2016

A study of the organization, powers, processes and politics of state government in Massachusetts. Topics will include Massachusetts history, political institutions, budgeting, political leaders, and contemporary issues in the state.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 360

The United States Congress

Offered: Fall Semester

This course explores the politics of the U.S. Congress. Emphasis is placed on representation, the legislative process, and policy making. Congressional organization, namely committee systems and party leadership, are also examined to gain a deeper understanding of Congressional decision-making.

Prerequisite(s): POL 123.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

POL 390

Politics in Washington, D.C.

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

A series of seminars during the semester will focus on an in-depth study of power and politics in American government. During a two-week stay in Washington, D.C., students will combine traditional academic work with seminars with prominent individuals in government, journalism and the nonprofit sector.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

Religious Studies

Code Course Credits

REL 233

American Catholic Social History

Offered: Fall Semester

An historical presentation of the numerous social issues, conflicts, and varied solutions in American Catholicism from the late 19th century forward with emphasis on how the many issues of society impacted Catholicism. The course demonstrates how the application of faith and various theological and philosophical theories were used in resolution of social conflict.

Fulfills the Moral Inquiry and Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirements.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

REL 238

Migrants, Immigrants, Refugees: Justice Issues and Catholic Responses

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

An examination of the "immigrant" dimension of the American Catholic Church, past and present, exposing the injustices experienced by the marginalized outsider/newcomer, exploring the Catholic Church's responses to these injustices utilizing Catholic social thought, and focusing on Hispanic culture and presence in the Catholic Church and American society.

Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

REL 262

Religion in America

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

An examination of a variety of religious ideas, institutions, and traditions in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis is placed upon questions of religious pluralism, religion and cultural identity, and religion in public life.

Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

Sociology

Code Course Credits

SOC 110

Lovin' it? A Sociology of McDonald's & Everyday Life (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course examines the historical rise of McDonald's and the resulting "McDonaldization" of everyday life. We'll study four main areas of McDonald's: its economic impact, health and environmental impact, cultural impact, and forms of opposition. Students will focus research and field experiences on four interrelated areas: labor, nutrition, environment, and youth.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
Fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Social Scientific Inquiry Requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

4

SOC 205

Sociology of Marriage and Family

Offered: Spring Semester

Concepts of marriage and family as social institutions; intimate relationships; human sexuality; roles, functions, change, and problems of American family.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

SOC 212

A Great Society?

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

This class explores society's social and political debate over what role society should have in social welfare, examines the principles of President Johnson's Great Society, and seeks an understanding of those forces that create and perpetuate social class problems. Issues include: poverty, child abuse, and mental illness.

Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

SOC 216

Native Americans in the 21st Century

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course analyzes the interactions between Native Americans and non-Natives. It looks critically at meanings of tribal sovereignty and the changing dynamics of international relations. Federal and state policies related to land, constitutional governments, crime and law enforcement, tribal recognition, sacred cultural artifacts, and economic development are assessed.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 218

Images and Power: Popular Culture

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course examines American popular culture as a site of cultural politics and explores representations of race, gender, sexuality and "success" that permeate our cultural space. Through a critical interrogation of a variety of pop culture forms, students will consider how norms and values are challenged, resisted, transformed and created through pop culture.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

SOC 234

Racial and Ethnic Diversity

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2011, 2013

Immigration, history, patterns of intergroup relations, modes of adaptation, social, economic, and political conditions, and contributions of selected racial and ethnic communities: The English and the Anglo-Saxons; Irish-Americans; Italian-Americans; Jewish-Americans; Native- Americans; African-Americans; Latino- and Hispanic-Americans; and Asian-Americans.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 236

Sociology of Urban Space

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

This course examines sociological theories and approaches to understanding urban, suburban, and exurban spaces. Case studies will consider how social class, culture, politics, industrialization, immigration, economics, and geography contribute to social identities of cities.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

SOC 237

Sociology of Gender

Offered: Spring Semester

Course will distinguish between sex and gender and critically examine how social historical meanings about femininity and masculinity are socially constructed, reinforced, and challenged. Considers how gender differences and gender inequality play out in a variety of institutions including education, the economy, the family, politics, religion, the media and medicine. Critical perspectives, including feminist and multi-cultural approaches, will be employed.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor. Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

SOC 302

Critical Issues in Contemporary Society

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Systematic analysis of major contemporary social problems with focus on their sources, patterns, consequences, and current efforts at intervention and amelioration.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

SOC 304

Introduction to Museum Studies

Offered: Not Offered 2011 - 2012

Survey of museology that introduces students to the history of museums and debates about their role in society. Through case studies of ethnographic, history, and art museums students will explore the relationships between museums, their missions, those they represent, and the communities in which they reside.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 or SOC 228.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.

3

SOC 328

Community Organizing: People, Power & Change

Offered: Not Offered 2013-2014

Covers theoretical frameworks and practical skills necessary to identify, recruit, and develop leadership, build community around that leadership, and build power from that community. The reflective practice of the course is structured around work in an organizing project (e.g. youth, community, electoral, union, or issue) designed to achieve a real outcome by semester's end.

Corequisite(s): SOC 101 (may be taken concurrently).
Course may be applied to the American Studies and the Gender & Sexuality Studies programs.

3

SOC 415

Seminar: American Inequality

Offered: Alternate Years: Fall 2014, 2016

Survey of the range of stratification systems. Emphasis on the American stratification system – social caste and its relationship to race, age, sex, religion, and ethnicity.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional SOC course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program.Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor.Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

SOC 421

Seminar: Oppression

Offered: Alternate Years: Spring 2012, 2014

Introduces the concept of oppression. Conditions of oppression to be explored include exploitation, marginalization, powerlessness, cultural imperialism, and violence. Emphasis on the interaction among racism, sexism, classism, anti-Semitism, heterosexism, and ageism, to show the interconnections among oppressions in everyday life. Reading assignments will challenge/encourage the students to take action to end oppressive behaviors and to affirm diversity and social justice. (Previously Seminar on Racism)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and one additional SOC course.
Course may be applied to the American Studies program. Course may be applied to the Anthropology minor. Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

3

Visual and Performing Arts

Code Course Credits

VPH 110

Art Now! Contemporary Trends (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

Students will investigate trends in recent art through engaging with theoretical and critical writings, in-class discussions, presentations by artists and critics, and visits to galleries and museums, such as the new contemporary wing of the Museum of Fine Arts, the Institute of Contemporary Art, the DeCordova Museum, and Mass MoCA.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
Fulfills the First-Year Seminar and History Conerstone Requirements.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

4

VPH 184

Introduction to Arts Administration

Offered: Fall Semester 2015

The course will introduce students to the many facets of arts administration in the visual and performing arts. Topics to be investigated will include: the role of arts in society; management strategies; funding venues; and legal and ethical issues in the arts.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

VPH 218

Art Since 1945

Offered: Spring Semester

Major movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Super Realism, Neo-Expressionism as well as works which go beyond traditional media (earthworks, video art, performance art, digital imaging). Day trips to museums and galleries complement class material.

Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

VPH 330

Topics in European or American Art

Offered: Spring Semester

Investigates focused topics in American art and culture from the Colonial period to the present. The topic will change each time the course is offered. Possible areas to be explored include: The "Other" in America; Jazz Age and Depression Art and Culture; Modernist/ Postmodernist Architecture. Recommended for Art History and American Studies concentrators.

Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

VPM 110

American Popular Music in the 20th Century (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

This course presents the diverse genres of American 20th century popular music as they developed from American psalmody, European classical music, and folk music and jazz. Emphasis is on critical thinking and writing about American pop, rock, and jazz. Students may attend a live concert in Boston.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
Fulfills the First-Year Seminar requirement.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

4

VPM 235

American Music in the 20th Century

Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015

This class concentrates on developments in American music during the 20th Century. Classical, jazz, Broadway, popular, and folk are explored, as well as the interrelation among music, theatre, dance and movies. Students are encouraged to engage in independent projects.

The class will attend concerts on and off campus.Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

3

Writing

Code Course Credits

WRI 110

Writing in New Media (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Spring Semester

Let's face it, writing in the 21st century is accomplished online. This course explores reading and writing across social media and other web spaces through genre study, cultural analysis, and real-world practice. Through posts, tweets, blogs, emails, and texts students will hone valuable skills necessary in the twenty-first century thought-place. Creating web-based resumes and professional avatars will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
Fulfills the First-Year Seminar Requirement. This course provides enhanced writing support. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

4

WRI 111

The Supernatural in Contemporary Pop Culture (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

We live in a world haunted by the fantastic. Vampires, werewolves, witches, fairies, ghosts, and even caped crusaders invade our everyday lives through entertainment media and advertising. This course will look at how these familiar creatures evolved and what they can teach us about history, culture, and ourselves.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
Fulfills the First-Year Seminar Requirement. This course provides enhanced writing support. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

4

WRI 112

Sports Rivalries: Who Wins? (First-Year Seminar)

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

Red Sox or Yankees? This seminar explores sports rivalries in American literature and popular culture, probing social, ethical, and political aspects while sharpening students' skills in writing, textual analysis, and public presentation. Emphasis will be on the writing process, the academic essay, and giving and receiving constructive feedback on written work.

Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
Fulfills the First-Year Seminar Requirement. This course provides enhanced writing support. Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

4